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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released January 25, 2019 | Resonance Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Experts in quality archives, Resonance Records, have dug up an essential Eric Dolphy gem. After leaving Prestige/New Jazz Records, the saxophonist worked during the summer of ‘63 with producer Alan Douglas (famous not only for his recordings with Jimi Hendrix but also for being behind the glass for the album Money Jungle with Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach). This meeting resulted in two albums: Iron Man and Conversations. The sessions were concocted with the crème de la crème of avant-garde jazz at that time: William "Prince" Lasha on flute, Huey "Sonny" Simmons on alto saxophone, Clifford Jordan on soprano saxophone, Woody Shaw on trumpet, Garvin Bushell on bassoon, Bobby Hutcherson on vibraphone, Richard Davis and Eddie Kahn on double bass and J.C. Moses and Charles Moffett on drums. Fast forward to January 2019: all the sessions from 1st and 3rd June 1963 have resurfaced, including some alternate takes. The tapes had been stored in a suitcase by Dolphy himself with other personal belongings just before he flew off on his last European tour, during which he died in Berlin on June 29th 1964 at the age of 36. The Californian had entrusted the suitcase to friends. Years later, it was recovered by flautist James Newton, who went through its content with Zev Feldman from Resonance Records and the pundits of the Eric Dolphy Trust in Los Angeles. With two and a half hours of music, Musical Prophet is a major document in Eric Dolphy's artistic evolution. A recording comparable to Out To Lunch!, his masterpiece for Blue Note released seven months later. But this is by no means a draft. Here, the group embark on trails both well-trodden and unexplored. Without cutting themselves off from their elders (Jitterbug Waltz by Fats Waller opens the album), they blow hot and cold and dare to explore all posibilities. Depending on the weapon of choice (alto saxophone, flute or bass clarinet), Dolphy expresses different qualities. Melancholic and introspective, almost as if irritated, if not panicky, he is constantly matched by accomplices who are just as quick as he is. And the musical freedom never erases the melodic framework. 56 years later, this emerging jazz has not lost any of its spontaneity and it would easily make some 2019 productions obsolete... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 10, 1988 | ENJA RECORDS Werner Aldinger

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Concord Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet

Jazz - Released January 1, 1970 | Celluloid

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Blue Note Records

Other Aspects is unlike any other title in Eric Dolphy's catalog. The startling 15-minute composition "Jim Crow," recorded in 1962 with an unidentified rhythm section and operatic singer, shows his embracing of 20th century classical composition. Strong Indian influence is heard on 1960's "Improvisations and Tukras," featuring Dolphy's flute mixed with tabla and tamboura. The final three pieces were also recorded in 1960: "Inner Flight 1 and 2" are solo flute pieces, while "Dolphy'n" is a collaboration with bassist Ron Carter featuring Dolphy on alto. This music remained in the private collection of Dolphy's friend Hale Smith until the recordings were handed over to Blue Note in 1985. While Other Aspects is fascinating, and in its own way essential, it should be one of the final discs obtained for your Dolphy library. ~ Al Campbell
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

The 1999 discovery of a previously unknown 1963 concert by Eric Dolphy makes it one of the finds of the decade. Taped for broadcast at the University of Illinois at Champaign, it was mentioned in an Eric Dolphy Internet chat room and eventually relayed to producer Michael Cuscuna. The sound is very good, except for overly prominent drums throughout the concert and an under-miked flute on "South Street Exit." Dolphy's playing is consistently rewarding, including a lengthy workout of "Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise," a miniature of "Something Sweet, Something Tender," and his always superb solo feature of "God Bless the Child." He switches to alto sax for an adventurous new work, "Iron Man" (which he would record a few months later for Douglas International), also inserting a hilarious quote of "Comin' Through the Rye." A 23-year-old Herbie Hancock on piano, Eddie Locke on bass, and drummer J. C. Moses make up the solid rhythm section. The last two tracks, "Red Planet" and Dolphy's "G.W.," add the support of the University of Illinois Brass Ensemble, which included a young Cecil Bridgewater on trumpet. Highly recommended!- ~ Ken Dryden
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Concord Records, Inc.

This CD reissue has rarities from three different Eric Dolphy sessions. "April Fool" and the alternate take of "G.W." are drawn from Dolphy's initial date as a leader, a quintet outing with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and pianist Jaki Byard. "Don't Blame Me" is taken from a Copenhagen concert but it is the two remaining numbers ("Status Seeking" and an unaccompanied rendition on bass clarinet of "God Bless the Child") that are of greatest interest. The latter cuts are taken from Dolphy's legendary gig at the Five Spot Cafe with trumpeter Booker Little, pianist Mal Waldron, bassist Richard Davis and drummer Ed Blackwell, not duplicating the seven more famous performances that are often thought of as the group's entire output. Although it is easy to think of this set on a whole as containing "leftovers," Dolphy's strong playing on alto, flute and bass clarinet makes the music of strong interest to his fans. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Concord Records, Inc.

Eric Dolphy is a perfect example of a jazz musician who lived a tragically short life but had a significant impact. The alto saxman/clarinetist/flutist, who first recorded as a leader in 1960, was only 36 when he died of diabetes-related causes in 1964 -- and since then, his work has influenced Dave Liebman, Steve Coleman, Jane Ira Bloom and quite a few others. Thankfully, Dolphy recorded frequently during his stay at Prestige, which is why Fantasy had no problem assembling an ambitious nine-CD box set titled The Complete Prestige Recordings. For the seasoned Dolphy enthusiast, that lavish release is well-worth owning, but for the casual listener, The Best of Eric Dolphy would be a more appropriate purchase. Focusing on his 19-month association with Prestige in 1961 and 1962, this 78-minute CD underscores the fact that Dolphy had one foot in the avant-garde and the other in post-bop and hard bop. Dolphy shows his appreciation of Ornette Coleman's breakthroughs on the cerebral "Out There," but a less radical sense of swing asserts itself on the Charlie Parker-ish "Miss Ann," the vibrant "Booker's Waltz" and a tender performance of Rodgers & Hart's "Glad to Be Unhappy"." Although it isn't difficult to pinpoint Dolphy's influences -- who range from Parker and Jackie McLean to John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman -- he was a distinctive, recognizable player in his own right, and his individuality shined through whether he was on alto sax, bass clarinet or flute. The Best of Eric Dolphy is far from the last word on Dolphy's Prestige output, but for those who aren't ready for The Complete Prestige Recordings, this collection can be an excellent starting point. ~ Alex Henderson
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Jazz - Released June 2, 2009 | Prestige

Booklet
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Jazz - Released August 16, 1960 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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Jazz - Released July 1, 2016 | RReMark

This Eric Dolphy CD appeared out of nowhere in 2000, and Dolphy fans might be enticed by the supposed presence of any unreleased tracks. Sadly, this low-quality reissue, which lacks a list of musicians, liner notes, track timings, or composer credits, is little more than a rip-off. The first four tracks were originally recorded in 1963 and previous appeared on LPs issued by either Everest or Douglas. The obvious surface noise indicates this label didn't even bother to pretend that they had access to the master tapes but simply dubbed the tracks from records. "Stormy Weather" is the originally unreleased first take recorded by Candid under the leadership of Charles Mingus in 1960, with Dolphy on alto sax, trumpeter Ted Curson, and drummer Dannie Richmond; the distorted sound, particularly of the bass, is the result of lousy production by this cheesy reissue label and not on the original tape. "Wherever I Go" sounds as if it is a date by drummer Chico Hamilton's quintet; the instrumentation includes drums, cello, bass, guitar, and Dolphy doubling on alto sax and flute, although he only solos on the former. Whether or not this one track has been previously issued in any form, the first five tracks contained on this CD are all available elsewhere with far superior sound, making this release an extremely poor investment; therefore, the price would have to be extremely low for Dolphy fans to justify paying for one track of less than four minutes in length. ~ Ken Dryden
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records, Inc.

This is the weakest of Eric Dolphy's three CDs that were recorded at a Copenhagen concert with a Danish rhythm section (pianist Bent Axen, bassist Erik Moseholm, and drummer Jorn Elniff). The problem is that there are three straight versions of the rather dull "In the Blues" and none are all that interesting. Much better is Dolphy's exploration (on bass clarinet) of "When Lights Are Low" and his alto feature during "Woody 'n You," but overall this is one of the less essential Eric Dolphy releases. ~ Scott Yanow