Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released March 31, 2015 | Concord Jazz

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS - Grammy Awards
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released March 31, 2015 | Concord Jazz

Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
HI-RES$13.49
CD$11.49

Vocal Jazz - Released August 30, 2019 | Concord Jazz

Hi-Res
Since moving to the United States in 1981, it was only in 2015 with Made in Brazil and again in 2017 with Dance of Time that Eliane Elias returned to her native Brazil to record the two albums. The São Paulo singer-pianist-composer’s strength lies in transporting the listener to the seductive atmospheres of Brazil, even when the repertoire is rather well-known… very well-known in fact. With this aptly named Love Stories, Elias showcases her skills not only as a brilliant jazz pianist and sensual singer but also as an arranger, composer and producer! Sung almost entirely in English, this 2019 vintage blends three original pieces with seven covers of hits from the golden age of bossa nova and the sixties, popularized by the likes of Antonio Carlos Jobim or Frank Sinatra. Despite this, Love Stories is not an excessively nostalgic record. This collection of love songs exhibits the timeless grace of songs from the 20th century by Jobim with the great arranger Claus Ogerman. And with the very popular (maybe too popular?) compositions, such as the theme from Francis Lai’s film Un homme et une femme, Eliane Elias once again succeeds in fascinating us. Subtlety, vulnerability, finesse, refinement and grace: the Paulista demonstrates why these words are so often attached to her name. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released March 24, 2017 | Concord Jazz

Hi-Res Booklet
Way back in 1991, Brazilian-born pianist Eliane Elias opened Illusions, her debut solo album, with a tune called "Choro." It offered a swinging distillation of the musical form that has been at the heart of her life-long study of samba. Since then, she's revisited her musical heritage over and over again, wedding modern jazz to post-1960 Brazilian jazz and MPB. In the process, she's developed an instantly identifiable sound as a pianist. Dance of Time follows 2015's fine Made in Brasil, a set that relied most heavily on bossa nova. Teaming again with collaborative producers Steve Rodby and husband Marc Johnson, Elias is accompanied by a stellar rhythm section: bassist Marcelo Mariano, guitarist Marcus Teixeira, drummer Edu Ribeiro, and percussionists Marivaldo dos Santos and Gustavo di Dalva on most of this set. Recorded in Brazil and New York, the date also includes a wonderful guest list that includes Take 6's Mark Kibble, Randy Brecker, Mike Manieri, Joao Bosco -- who adds his voice and guitar to a lovely reading of his own "Coisa Feita" -- and Toquinho. The program contains readings of killer sambas such as "O Pato," Joao Donato's eternal "Sambou Sambou," the wonderful "Samba de Orly" (co-composed by Toquinho, who also sings on it, Vinicius De Moraes and Chico Buarque), and Ary Barroso's "Na Batacuda da Vida." Each of these numbers remains faithful to the originals, but Elias' arrangements, pianism, and breezy, syncopated vocals graft them so thoroughly onto swinging, straight-ahead, modern post-bop, it's difficult to accept they weren't always in the jazz fakebook. But she goes further. She injects Harry Warren's slippery pop blues "You're Getting to Be a Habit with Me," with a slow choro backbeat. She also transforms Kurt Weill's and Ogden Nash's sultry "Speak Low" into simmering, polished modern jazz with a fantastic multi-tracked backing vocal by Kibble and great soloing from Brecker. The best tunes here, however, are her own. "By Hand ("Em Maos") offers another backing vocal from Kibble, as Elias stitches samba onto bossa in a lithe, sensual groove. "An Up Dawn" is a vehicle for her intricate, syncopated chord voicings on her instrument's middle and lower registers, which create an interlocking dance of samba, tango, and bluesy ragtime. "Not to Cry (Pra Nao Chorar)" is a co-write with Toquinho -- who lends his guitar and weathered yet effective vocal in a duet. He began the tune in 1978 as a vehicle (for Elias) with the working title "Eliane." He completed it for this album with participation from the tune's muse. Their singing voices are an elegant yet earthy study in contrasts, while his lilting guitar chords pace her keyboard embellishments. Its tenderness sends the set off with a sweet whisper. Dance of Time is inspired, deftly musical, and truly accessible to a wide range of listeners from jazz to pop to Brazilian music. It's virtually flawless. ~ Thom Jurek
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Concord Jazz

Pianist and vocalist Eliane Elias pays tribute to legendary jazz trumpeter/vocalist Chet Baker on her 2013 album I Thought About You. Featuring a selection of standards strongly associated with Baker, Elias mixes her native Brazilian bossa nova with swing, straight-ahead jazz, and even a few bluesy flourishes with much aplomb. The album, produced by Elias' husband, bassist Marc Johnson, also features guitarists Steve Cardenas and Oscar Castro-Neves, drummers Victor Lewis and Rafael Barata, and percussionist Marivaldo Dos Santos. Also adding more than a few moments of deft and thoughtful improvisation is trumpeter Randy Brecker. As Baker grew up listening to the music of the '30s and '40s, many of his own choices for songs to play were informed by the great songbook of those decades. Baker also had a natural inclination toward a pretty melody and romantic lyric and he never failed to pick great songs to perform. Subsequently, Baker's recordings showcase a superb batch of tunes to choose from. Elias, who has also leaned toward playing melodic, often romantic music, is a perfect conduit for reinterpreting Baker. Here she plays such songs as "There Will Never Be Another You," "Let's Get Lost," "Just Friends," "Embraceable You," and "I Get Along Without You Very Well." ~ Matt Collar
CD$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released August 22, 2006 | Bluebird

CD$16.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Blue Note Records

Eliane Elias is such a fine hard bop/post-bop pianist that it is a pity that she occasionally feels compelled to vocalize; her singing voice is small, quiet, and unimpressive. However, other than her brief vocals on "The Beat of My Heart," "I Fall in Love Too Easily," and "Blah Blah Blah," this is a strong trio set. Elias interacts with either the bass-drum team of Marc Johnson and Jack DeJohnette or Christian McBride and Carl Allen, with guitarist Rodney Jones just popping up briefly on one song. Elias' playing is often introspective, but always very expressive and she swings hard on the faster pieces. She is one of the underrated greats of the jazz piano. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released April 3, 2004 | RCA Bluebird

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released April 13, 2018 | Concord Jazz

Hi-Res Booklet
Pianist Eliane Elias follows her Latin Grammy win for 2017's magnificent Dance of Time with this set of tunes from the iconic musical Man of La Mancha. During the mid-'90s, Elias was approached by Mitch Leigh, the Tony-winning composer of her musical; he'd followed her career and greatly admired her work. Accompanied by Neil Warner, arranger for the original musical, he commissioned the pianist to rearrange songs from the show. Elias was given complete freedom to choose which songs she wished to record. She hired two rhythm sections: One featured drummer Jack DeJohnette and bassist Eddie Gomez; the other bassist Marc Johnson, drummer Satoshi Takeishi, and master percussionist Manolo Badrena (who plays with both groups). Elias and her sidemen recorded nine songs live in studio. Unfortunately, the completed album was shelved due to contractual issues and seemed doomed to obscurity. Leigh passed in 2014 and never saw its release. Concord rescued the album and added it to their catalog some 23 years after recording. Listening now -- with Elias widely recognized as a jazz master -- is nothing short of revelatory. Each track has been thoroughly re-visioned, utilizing different rhythms, re-harmonizations, tempi, new intros, outros, interludes, and more. The songs here sound assured and disciplined, and are played with kinetic energy and empathy. Check the contrast between rhythm sections on the set's first two tracks, "To Each His Dulcinea," with Johnson, Takeishi, and Badrena, and "Dulcinea," with DeJohnette and Gomez. The former has a partido alto rhythm illuminated by rolling hand drums, lush Errol Garner-esque chord statements, and a popping bassline. The latter bears hints of "The Impossible Dream" within its intro. Elias combines a tender, bluesy swing with Bill Evans-style harmonics, all underscored by Gomez's gorgeous solo. The samba returns in "The Barber Song" and places Badrena alongside Gomez and DeJohnette. The samba piano intro is highlighted by Brazilian percussion instruments in interplay with the drum kit. Gomez doesn't so much hold things to the ground as push them further apart and together again. Elias' ranging solo employs an elegant use of Art Tatum's arpeggios and Herbie Hancock's rhythmic chording. "Man of La Mancha (I, Don Quixote)" is introduced by Gomez and DeJohnette playing in Capoeira rhythm, but it changes gears quickly with a piano interlude that introduces the melody even as Elias' left hand insistently interacts with the rhythm section. While a frevo rhythm drives album-closer "A Little Gossip," it is the track before, "The Impossible Dream," with Johnson, Takeishi, and Badrena, that nearly eclipses it. Fleet pacing aside, Elias' piano is recontextualized almost like that of a vocalist in the first half, and a post-bop soloist in the latter with a deft, swinging, Brazilian rhythmic approach from her left hand. Elias' governance on Music from Man of La Mancha is eclipsed only by her playing and arranging. Her intimate understanding of the tunes is balanced by imagination and taste. Thankfully, Concord is allowing jazz enthusiasts an opportunity to hear this fine recording at last. ~ Thom Jurek
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Blue Note Records

Featuring tracks culled from eight of her albums, beginning fittingly enough with 1989's Eliane Elias Plays Jobim, Blue Note has compiled a strong collection of pianist Eliane Elias' Brazilian jazz cuts on Brazilian Classics. Elias' classically influenced touch is evident here on such standards as Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Chega de Saudade" and "One Note Samba," as well as her medley of Milton Nascimento works off her 1992 Fantasia release. While it would have been nice for Blue Note to include some rarities or alternate takes, as it stands Brazilian Classics works as a fitting representation of Elias' take on her home country's unique sound. ~ Matt Collar
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released April 13, 2018 | Concord Jazz

CD$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released August 30, 2002 | RCA Bluebird

For a long time, Eliane Elias seemed like a fixture at Blue Note. The Brazilian singer/pianist started recording for that well-known jazz label in the late '80s, and she was still on Blue Note when the 21st century arrived. But in 2002, Elias did the unexpected and moved to RCA; Kissed by Nature is her first RCA release. For the most part, this is a vocal album, although Elias does get in some likable solos -- and this time, she emphasizes relaxed, laid-back Brazilian pop-jazz. Kissed by Nature is essentially Brazilian easy listening, although it isn't bloodless elevator Muzak; even at her most commercial, Elias probably has too much substance and integrity for the average smooth jazz/NAC station. One thing she doesn't have is a great voice. While Elias is an excellent pianist, her voice is undeniably thin -- as a vocalist, she doesn't have a fantastic range by any means. But despite Elias' obvious limitations as a singer, her vocals (some in English, some in Portuguese, and some wordless) are pleasant enough on caressing pop-jazz originals like "A Volta," "Balancê," and the title track. No one will accuse Elias' singing of being in a class with the five-star performances of Gal Costa or Ithamara Koorax, but she does bring warmth and sincerity to her singing -- and those things count for something. Most of the material on Kissed by Nature was written or co-written by Elias; the exception is a medley of songs by Brazilian superstar Djavan, and that medley is arguably the album's standout track (which isn't to say that Elias' own writing isn't respectable). Kissed by Nature won't go down in history as one of Elias' essential releases, but it's a decent effort that's worth hearing if you need a dose of Brazilian mood music. ~ Alex Henderson
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released March 24, 2017 | Concord Jazz

Way back in 1991, Brazilian-born pianist Eliane Elias opened Illusions, her debut solo album, with a tune called "Choro." It offered a swinging distillation of the musical form that has been at the heart of her life-long study of samba. Since then, she's revisited her musical heritage over and over again, wedding modern jazz to post-1960 Brazilian jazz and MPB. In the process, she's developed an instantly identifiable sound as a pianist. Dance of Time follows 2015's fine Made in Brasil, a set that relied most heavily on bossa nova. Teaming again with collaborative producers Steve Rodby and husband Marc Johnson, Elias is accompanied by a stellar rhythm section: bassist Marcelo Mariano, guitarist Marcus Teixeira, drummer Edu Ribeiro, and percussionists Marivaldo dos Santos and Gustavo di Dalva on most of this set. Recorded in Brazil and New York, the date also includes a wonderful guest list that includes Take 6's Mark Kibble, Randy Brecker, Mike Manieri, Joao Bosco -- who adds his voice and guitar to a lovely reading of his own "Coisa Feita" -- and Toquinho. The program contains readings of killer sambas such as "O Pato," Joao Donato's eternal "Sambou Sambou," the wonderful "Samba de Orly" (co-composed by Toquinho, who also sings on it, Vinicius De Moraes and Chico Buarque), and Ary Barroso's "Na Batacuda da Vida." Each of these numbers remains faithful to the originals, but Elias' arrangements, pianism, and breezy, syncopated vocals graft them so thoroughly onto swinging, straight-ahead, modern post-bop, it's difficult to accept they weren't always in the jazz fakebook. But she goes further. She injects Harry Warren's slippery pop blues "You're Getting to Be a Habit with Me," with a slow choro backbeat. She also transforms Kurt Weill's and Ogden Nash's sultry "Speak Low" into simmering, polished modern jazz with a fantastic multi-tracked backing vocal by Kibble and great soloing from Brecker. The best tunes here, however, are her own. "By Hand ("Em Maos") offers another backing vocal from Kibble, as Elias stitches samba onto bossa in a lithe, sensual groove. "An Up Dawn" is a vehicle for her intricate, syncopated chord voicings on her instrument's middle and lower registers, which create an interlocking dance of samba, tango, and bluesy ragtime. "Not to Cry (Pra Nao Chorar)" is a co-write with Toquinho -- who lends his guitar and weathered yet effective vocal in a duet. He began the tune in 1978 as a vehicle (for Elias) with the working title "Eliane." He completed it for this album with participation from the tune's muse. Their singing voices are an elegant yet earthy study in contrasts, while his lilting guitar chords pace her keyboard embellishments. Its tenderness sends the set off with a sweet whisper. Dance of Time is inspired, deftly musical, and truly accessible to a wide range of listeners from jazz to pop to Brazilian music. It's virtually flawless. ~ Thom Jurek
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Blue Note Records

Eliane Elias' debut for Blue Note is a bit of a disappointment. Having established her credentials as a fine acoustic pianist, she switched back to her less personal synthesizer work and contributed some rather mundane wordless vocals. The music (which includes some solos from tenor saxophonist Michael Brecker and Randy Brecker on flugelhorn) is not terrible, but it lacks a sense of adventure and sounds as if potential radio airplay was its main goal. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Blue Note Records

Two sides of Eliane Elias are on display on this CD. She is heard as an effective soft-toned singer of bossa nova and (particularly on the last few numbers) as a strong post-bop jazz pianist. The bossas (which often feature guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves and flutist Dave Valentin) are enjoyable, if a bit lightweight, and "Chorango" (which has Gil Goldstein on accordion and violinist Mark Feldman) is a modern tango. But it is as a pianist that Elias is most significant, and fortunately, there are enough instrumentals on this release to make it worth picking up by jazz listeners. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$18.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Blue Note Records

CD$11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Blue Note Records

Eliane Elias is a very talented acoustic pianist whose style at times hints at Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea, but sounds quite individual. Unfortunately, this set is extremely lightweight. Most numbers have Elias doubling on synthesizers, with over half of the selections also including her wordless vocals; her voice is average at best. The tunes are moderately pop-ish without being memorable and Elias' piano playing is secondary to the weak melodies (all but "Let Me Go" are her originals) and so-so grooves. Eliane Elias is capable of so much better. Fortunately, there are many better Elias recordings available than this misfire. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Blue Note Records

This release is a change of pace for Eliane Elias. Instead of interpreting Brazilian songs, fusion, or modern bop, Elias shows off her classical technique on a set of acoustic solos plus six duets with Herbie Hancock. She really digs into the standards (sometimes sounding a little like Keith Jarrett) and creates some fairly free and unexpected ideas while putting the accent on lyricism. Some of the music is introspective, and there are wandering sections, but the net results are logical and enjoyable. As for the duets, Elias and Hancock mostly stay out of each other's way, which is an accomplishment when one considers that the four-part "Messages" is a series of free improvisations. There are playful spots (particularly on the adventurous ten-minute rendition of "The Way You Look Tonight") and, since Elias knows Hancock's style well (and was clearly thrilled to have him on the date), their collaborations work quite well. A successful outing. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released April 7, 2010 | Savoy

CD$16.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Angel Records