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Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 10, 2014 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2011 | Some Bizzare

Though it's a bit less intentionally noisy than previous Neubaten material, ½ Mensch is, in a way, the group's masterpiece. The inspired use of such "traditional" instruments as a grand piano alongside the band's characteristic blazing percussion make for a record similar more to their compositional influences like Stockhausen than their nearest contemporaries, Throbbing Gristle or Cabaret Voltaire. The record that showed Einstürzende Neubaten could rise above the concept of noise for its own sake to reach another level of noise-oriented post-punk music, ½ Mensch is an excellent feat of industrial music. © John Bush /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2011 | Some Bizzare

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2000 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2011 | Some Bizzare

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 23, 1996 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 8, 2014 | M.i.G - music GmbH

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2020 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2011 | Some Bizzare

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 21, 1991 | Mute

Much like the first and second installments of Einsturzende Neubauten's overview series, Strategies Against Architecture III haphazardly juggles highlights with rarities, live tracks, and unreleased material, doubling as an agreeable state of the union. This third volume covers 1991-2001, a period that saw some upheaval; following the exits of Mark Chung and F.M. Einheit and the death of associate Roland Wolf, Neubauten considered disbanding. Thankfully, the original core of Blixa Bargeld, Alex Hacke, and N.U. Unruh opted to carry on. Throughout the early '90s and into the next decade, the group's sound became less confrontational and less jarring, but it never came close to growing complacent. Neubauten's enduring ability to challenge themselves and their audience while remaining as creative as the day they started finding metallic objects to throttle is well-summarized here. Although much of the extra material collected is on par with the proper LP material they released during the period, the compilation isn't without its frustrations. The running order is completely helter-skelter (perhaps that's part of the point), with no sense of flow whatsoever, perhaps altering the effect of each song in a bad way; the scattered live tracks make listeners crave an entirely live disc that captures the experience of a full show; the detailed notes on each track make listeners wish that a similar setup accompanied their non-compilations; the alternate versions of songs aren't that alternate; Blixa doesn't scream enough (though he never screams enough). All qualms aside, this digest is solidly stocked with fine experimental music that isn't willfully difficult to digest. Another thing to consider is the attached photo bonanza, which depicts everything from some of Neubauten's bizarre musical doohickeys to what appears to be some shots of a family reunion-type event. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 1981 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 27, 2005 | Mute

A series of sustained reflections of the day-to-day world, PERPETUUM MOBILE finds Einstürzende Neubauten exploring the subtle power of ambient noise and textures. The group doesn't blaze radically new stylistic ground--gone are the days of bulldozers, jackhammers, and Blixa Bargeld's vocal freakouts, along with their accompanying moments of transcendence and catharsis. Nevertheless, the intensity, command of dynamics, and, yes, musicality at the heart of Einstürzende Neubauten's sound are on display throughout PERPETUUM MOBILE, a challenging but not self-consciously difficult album that, like all of the group's best work, rewards repeated listens. © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2020 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2007 | Mute

Einstürzende Neubauten's '90s productions may not have been anything like old fans might have expected, but Tabula Rasa tries to maintain the tradition without falling into repetition and instead brings something new to their music. Tabula Rasa is a very diverse album. Even though only songs "Die Interimsliebenden" and "Headcleaner" really stand out, every song has a catch that keeps it interesting. The keyword for Tabula Rasa is "ambience." Neubauten maintain their aggression throughout the end of of the album, and all the power and noise unbend in the 15-minute magnum opus, "Headcleaner." Before that there's 22 minutes of quiet but tight, dark ambient. The opener, "Die Interimsliebenden," may be the only relaxed song on the album, and that's why Tabula Rasa may be difficult to listen to all the way through. The tracks as single songs are very good indeed, but as a whole they form a very tight -- and maybe too tight -- whole. And Blixa Bargeld's weird lyrics don't ease the pressures. Tabula Rasa is not a bad album, it's just not a masterpiece like Kollaps. © Antti J. Ravelin /TiVo
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2X4

Ambient - Released May 22, 2007 | ROIR

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 2, 2002 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 2007 | Potomak

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2010 | Mute

4 stars out of 5 - "Few made music as intense and powerful then; no one really does now." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2010 | Mute