Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released April 1, 1979 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD$29.49

Jazz - Released October 26, 1981 | ECM

From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 1989 | ECM

From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released March 1, 1985 | ECM

"Aquarela do Brasil," an unofficial anthem of Brazil, may have received literally thousands of different version and interpretations, but even then, Egberto and Brazilian percussionist Naná Vasconcelos (his sole accompanist here) were able to devise an extremely original version, which opens with an unassuming stylized samba introduction, slowly bringing elements which conduce the listener to the piece's identification. Egberto is very fond of percussive attacks and ethereal configurations, both acquiring superior importance in his music, not being necessarily attached to or supportive for a musical theme or melody. Therefore, the next defined melody presented (in the low strings of his 10 string violão) is at track six, "Bianca," which is a complex yet lyrical construction based in which seems a folkloric rhythm motif. Follows "Dom Quixote," another beautiful, lyrical, courageously simple theme delivered at the piano, with Naná's emulating of an African chant and his triangle playing in the forró tradition. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
From
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released May 1, 1978 | ECM

From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released January 26, 2004 | ECM

Booklet
Egberto Gismonti's volume in the excellent ECM Rarum series contains material from seven of his ten albums for the label as a leader, none from the 124 recordings on his own label distributed by ECM. It hardly matters. Gismonti is the most enigmatic and mercurial of the artists on the roster. Being from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, he has made a life of delving deep into his country's magical musical framework that draws into itself and expands upon the many cultures that have intersected with it from Africa, Europe, and the United States. The music contained here finds Gismonti, ever the shamanistic gadfly conjurer, singing and playing no less than eight instruments, from percussion to guitars to flutes. The settings range from the stunning solo guitar of "Cavaquinho," where classical and Indian notions dovetail one another, to more conventional quartets such as the one found on "Ensaio de Escola de Samba" with another guitar, cello, and double bass, or the string players on "10 Anos," which features his piano playing in a jazz quartet with saxophone. And then there is "Frevo," a work that reflects not only Gismonti's knowledge and frenetic approach to counterpoint as it manifests itself in Brazilian and European classical music, but the frenzy of Carnaval as it engages his pianism to a symphony orchestra. These selections are sequenced nearly perfectly and offer a radiant and ambitious portrait of one of the most revered and misunderstood musicians ECM has ever recorded. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released October 1, 1996 | ECM

From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released March 1, 1977 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | ECM

An ensemble with strings enhances the beauty of Gismonti's improvisations. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
From
CD$29.49

Jazz - Released June 19, 2009 | ECM

From
CD$11.49

Jazz - Released March 1, 1996 | ECM

From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released April 1, 1984 | ECM

Excellent compilation. Looking for a Volume II. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released June 1, 1993 | ECM

A solid statement -- rare with ensemble. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released May 1, 1991 | ECM

This excellent release by Egberto Gismonti was conceived under the concept of a circus, an institution that has the ambivalent quality of being at the same time universal and regional; the "circense" tradition exists in almost all parts of the globe, but it is enriched by the smaller companies that keep struggling to survive in poorer setups, adding regional elements to the whole. It fits like a glove for the music of Gismonti, which also aims to enrich Brazilian musical tradition with elements of worldwide classical and popular acquisitions. The album is fully performed by excellent Brazilian musicians: Mauro Senise (saxes/flute), Egberto Gismonti (several instruments), Luiz Alves (bass), Robertinho Silva (percussion), Silvio Mehry (piano), Pery Reis (guitar), Aleuda Malu (vocals and percussion), Dulce Bressane (vocals), Pepê Castro-Neves (vocals), and a string orchestra conducted by Benito Juarez. On "Cego Aderaldo," a folkloric northeastern blind and nomadic guitar player is paid tribute to. which has only the Indian violinist Lakshminarayana Shankar and Gismonti on the Brazilian ten-string viola. The most conspicuous composition of the album is, without a doubt, "Palhaço." Unpretentious in its conventional blues-like harmony, its passionate, touching melody progresses upon an apparently infinite harmonic cycle until an orchestrated modinha bridge comes in. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo

Jazz - Released November 10, 1970 | Universal Music Ltda.

Download not available
From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released May 1, 1991 | ECM

From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released April 21, 1997 | ECM

From
CD$6.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1992 | Milan Music

From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Carmo

This is the Cd reissue of an album recorded in 1985. It has highs and lows. The highs are the superb compositions of Heitor Villa-Lobos, Brazil's best classical composer of all time; the desire (and courage) of Egberto' in proposing himself to freely adapt these masterpieces (for which he had to get the approval and personal cooperation of Mindinha Villa-Lobos, the maestro's widow, who asked in person for the publishers' clearance); and the excellent performance of the orchestra and band's musicians. "Pobre cega" is the highest point in the album: under a faithful theme exposure, Egberto added a typical percussive set, which really expanded the interest of the original music. The lows are the dated synthesizer timbres and the misconception of some treatments (as in "Dansa" and "Cantiga") which sometimes recall Rick Wakeman and his progressive rock. The album really doesn't add much to Villa-Lobos' music, but is a touching manifestation of respect and admiration. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released May 1, 1991 | Carmo