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Pop/Rock - Released October 19, 1989 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released June 11, 1992 | Epic

Edgar Winter came out of the chute kicking with this remarkable record filled with jazz, blues, and a little old-fashioned rock & roll. The record follows an established theme throughout its first side, stringing the songs together without breaks, highlighted by dreamy keyboard and sax work, plus Winter's smooth vocalizations. But jazz isn't the only thing Winter brings to the party. His first recorded version of the old J.D. Loudermilk tune "Tobacco Road" throws a few nice punches (although the live version with White Trash a few years later would prove the definitive one). "Jimmy's Gospel" plays on his early church influences, while "Jump Right Out" is the predecessor of half-a-dozen "jump up and dance" numbers Winter would pepper his records with in the years to come. ~ Michael B. Smith
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Pop/Rock - Released July 31, 1986 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released June 22, 1989 | Epic

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Pop - Released October 24, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released September 17, 2009 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop/Rock - Released September 24, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

Not since his debut, Entrance, had Edgar Winter appeared in a solo capacity. This time out, he reverts to his heavy jazz and gospel influences to produce an album that merits much more attention than what it ultimately received. Winter is decidedly laid-back on tracks such as "Hello Mellow Feelin'" and "Tell Me in a Whisper," which serve as the finest of the nine tracks here. Winter puts on his party hat once again with the rocking "Out of Control," the final track on a pretty nice little rock & roll document. ~ Michael B. Smith
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Pop/Rock - Released April 19, 2001 | Epic - Legacy

While some might argue that one reasonably well-compiled Edgar Winter best-of is enough, Sony Legacy follows Rhino's 1986 Collection with this 2002 edition, which only shares six tracks with its predecessor. With liner notes and involvement from Winter, this might be a little closer to what he would like to be remembered by, and since all of his best work was recorded for Epic, there are no cross-licensing issues complicating matters. But that doesn't mean it's better. There are some major differences; Rhino chose the 17-minute live "Tobacco Road" from Roadwork, while this sticks with the shorter studio version from the Entrance album. The Best of Edgar Winter also nabs two other tunes from that debut, which Winter is clearly proud of according to his album notes. But neither the title track nor the jazzy seven-minute "Fire and Ice" gels with the rockin' gospel of White Trash or the pop/rock of They Only Come out at Night, making the sequencing rough going. The cheesy disco of "It's Your Life to Live" has not aged well and its inclusion here is puzzling, especially when nothing from the relatively well-received Shock Treatment album is included. "Rock and Roll Revival" seems forced and stiff, yet picking "Harlem Shuffle" from Edgar and Johnny Winter's only joint album, Together, is a smart addition. Oddly neither disc selected Edgar Winter's live version of "Rock and Roll, Hootchie Koo," a perplexing omission. Since this new compilation doesn't improve on Rhino's, its appearance is difficult to understand. While the sound quality might be slightly crisper due to technological improvements over the years, there's no other reason to choose this over the previous version, which, as of its appearance in 2002, was still in print and track for track is a more enjoyable listen. ~ Hal Horowitz
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Blues - Released January 9, 2019 | SPV

This set of Edgar Winter's jazzy remakes of older tunes and some new ones is all over the place. With a cast that includes guitarists Robben Ford and Hiram Bullock, Steve Lukather, and Michael Hakes, and bassists like Will Lee, Mark Meadows, and Tom Lilly, as well as trumpeter Lee Thornburg, one gets exactly what one expects: a slick, groove-infested ride through Winter's past and present. Winter himself plays alto saxophone, keyboard and sings in places. He also acts as the album's producer, which is not a good thing. Other than the Hammond B3, the keyboards sound like bad 1980's sci-fi soundtrack-reject mixes, and the arrangements on some of the tunes border on the laughable -- particularly the remakes of "Free Ride (Smooth") -yes, as in a smooth jazz version, and "Frankenstein (Frankie Swing)" that must have been an afterthought because it feels so forced and false. ~ Thom Jurek
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Pop/Rock - Released July 15, 1996 | Intersound

It's like a comeback album from a star that never really went away, as Edgar Winter plays host to musicians ranging from Leon Russell to Jermaine Jackson, Ronnie Montrose, Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, and perennial sidekick Rick Derringer. Even Edgar's brother Johnny Winter shows up to play. "Hootchie Koo" kicks off the record, a rocking number that includes vocal solos from Russell, brother Johnny and others. The mellow "Sanctuary" is quite nice, and "The Real Deal" is a real kicker. This is one of Winter's best albums in quite some time. ~ Michael B. Smith
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Pop/Rock - Released April 22, 2003 | Intersound