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Pop/Rock - Released February 5, 1989 | Legacy Recordings

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Reggae - Released January 27, 2015 | Panda Bear Productions

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Pop/Rock - Released May 5, 1992 | Legacy - Columbia

Eddie Murphy is one of those people who was obviously going to be a huge star from the very beginning. The Long Island, NY-born comedian was a nationwide sensation by the time he was 21. He exploded as the breakout star on Saturday Night Live during the lean early-'80s years when the show faced the daunting task of rebuilding after the classic original cast had left to pursue movie stardom, which Murphy would ultimately do as well. Despite Murphy's gifts, his first standup comedy album, 1982's Eddie Murphy, is uneven despite containing some classic routines. Eddie Murphy was recorded at The Comic Strip in New York City between April 30 and May 1, 1982. "Buckwheat" riffs on his memorable SNL character and expands it to sarcastically note that blacks aren't named for specific breakfast cereals. "Black Movie Theaters," "Talking Cars," and "Myths/A Little Chinese" are based on various racial stereotypes -- not exactly politically correct, but very funny. "Doo-Doo/Christmas Gifts" features Murphy's musings on how fathers get shafted when they receive cheap Christmas presents. The hysterical "Drinking Fathers" is loaded with belly laughs -- and a horrifying, underlying look at working-class alcoholism. The manic "Hit By a Car" is the best, most clever segment as Murphy explodes into overdrive. Comics often include novelty songs on their albums, and so does Murphy -- with average results. "Boogie in Your Butt" weaves Murphy's spoken and semi-rap vocals, but the best part is the funky bassline. "Enough Is Enough" is a parody of 1979's chart-topping Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer duet "No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)," with Murphy once again recreating Buckwheat and imitating effeminate fitness guru Richard Simmons. For a perfect comedy classic, you have to jump one year ahead to 1983's Eddie Murphy: Comedian, but Eddie Murphy is a promising start. © Bret Adams /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released April 11, 1983 | Columbia - Legacy

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By the time Eddie Murphy's Comedian was released, he was already on top of the comedy world, as well as one of Hollywood and television's most important stars. He was already known for taking standup comedy and pushing it to the limit, but on Comedian he takes it one step further and in the process influenced an entire generation of aspiring young comedians to develop standup in a similar fashion. None of the topics Murphy covers here are necessarily groundbreaking, but the manner in which he sets up and executes joke after joke is almost like a machine gun: while one joke has unfolded and the audience is recovering, he's firing off the next round with excellent timing and accuracy. Comedian is a classic and one not easily bested in the comedy album world. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Reggae - Released June 30, 2015 | Panda Bear Productions

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Pop/Rock - Released April 29, 1997 | Columbia

Greatest Comedy Hits compiles most of Eddie Murphy's most famous comedy bits, as well as some that were never available on disc before. Murphy's hilarious riffs on Mick Jagger and James Brown, his classic routine on hit-and-run drivers, and his impressions of his drunken father -- they're all here. Included as well are recordings from his films Coming to America and Nutty Professor, as well as some riffs from his concert film, Raw, none of which were ever released on CD before. The real coup, though, consists of the seven previously unreleased recordings made at various club and stage appearances, some apparently from the late '80s and early '90s. Though the sound quality is uneven, which sometimes causes the jokes to be drowned out by the audience, there is still plenty of gold to be mined here. Murphy's take on Moses (most of his miracles were the result of a mistranslated speech impediment), his routine about a conversation with Little Richard, and his description of the birth of his first child are as classic as anything else here. His other new routines are too short (or in the case of "Almost Fucked a Midget," far too long) to be as vintage, but contain scattered laughs here and there. Fans may quibble over absent selections, such as his infamous gay Honeymooners bit, but for newcomers as well as longtime fans, Greatest Comedy Hits is a necessary purchase. © Victor W. Valdivia /TiVo