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Alternative & Indie - Released December 10, 2019 | Domino Documents

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 13, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Since 2002, Dave Longstreth has been leading an exemplary career, notably working alongside Björk, Kanye West, Rihanna or Solange. The talent of the leader of the Dirty Projectors is obvious with the eighth album of his band. Lamp Lit Prose arrives a year after Dirty Projectors and turns a page for the Dirty Projectors. Recorded in Ivo Shandor in Los Angeles, this is probably the catchiest, most playful and developed disc of the quintet. Love and women in general are important themes, notably on the pop title Break-Thru, probably echoing his divorce with Amber Coffman, the former singer of the band. Lamp Lit Prose also highlights its collaborations for a more eclectic work. Syd from The Internet on the electro pop Right Now and Amber Mark for more tropical colors on I Feel Energy. The Dirty Projectors don’t intend to erase their image, however. No, they enrich it with various sounds, give it more flavors and highlight rhythms that they didn’t dare to explore before. It’s a trust that has been built with time but also thanks to accomplished artists such as Empress Of, Robin Pecknold from the Fleets Foxes, the former Vampire Weekend Rostam or even Dear Nora. They juggle electro influences, English pop kitsch and soul spirit. Filled of keyboards, sax solos, a bit of jazz and flute layers around melodic voices, (I Wanna) Feel It All paints an atypical 60s landscape very similar to the album © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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What becomes of the brokenhearted? Well, in the case of David Longstreth, they make some changes. Since the last time Longstreth made a Dirty Projectors album (2012's Swing Lo Magellan), his long-term relationship with Amber Coffman, who sang and played guitar with the group, ended. In time-honored fashion, Longstreth has made a break-up album, but 2017's Dirty Projectors has a musical personality that's decidedly different than most of the group's work. While the mix of indie rock and world music flavors that defined much of Dirty Projectors' releases is still present here, this album is dominated by electronics, especially the aggressive use of Auto-Tuned and sampled vocals. The first moments of opening track "Keep Your Name" feature Longstreth's vocals bent into a deep and doomy variant on his usual bright, airy instrument, and while the harmonies that are one of his stylistic trademarks are on hand, in this case they sound like Longstreth is singing with a digital ghost of himself rather than other people. With the voices often chopped and twisted as they square against deep bass patches and vintage synth sounds, while organic strings and horns bubble in the background, Dirty Projectors abandons the organic tone Longstreth made so much of in the past, and trades it for a digital universe where nothing seems quite real, even when it's beautiful end engaging. The production is a superb match for the songs, which deal with the various aspects of a love affair that's flamed out, and Tyondai Braxton, of Battles, proves to be an excellent collaborator, helping Longstreth work out the melodies and make this album a fascinating, absorbing listen even at its most forbidding. The broken-hearted Longstreth sounds like a changed man in many respects, but he's no less talented and visionary than he was before, and Dirty Projectors demonstrates that musically and lyrically, love and its absence have taught him a thing or two. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2007 | Dead Oceans

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 1, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 5, 2005 | Western Vinyl

Ever ambitious, the work of Brooklyn-based experimental indie group the Dirty Projectors here takes a bizarre narrative turn. Ostensibly a concept album about the singer Don Henley, it takes its protagonist on a strange, near-suicidal journey through avant Americana, culminating with the lead singer crooning about brown finches. Epic in scope, The Getty Address features around 25 different musicians contributing various orchestral lines, while the core of the band takes care of the overriding story arc.
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 11, 2003 | Western Vinyl

Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 22, 2016 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 18, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 15, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 6, 2004 | Western Vinyl

Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Electronic/Dance - Released May 13, 2013 | Domino Recording Co

Alternative & Indie - Released June 15, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 9, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 5, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Dirty Projectors in the magazine