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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 25, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 27, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 4, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 1, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 13, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Since 2002, Dave Longstreth has been leading an exemplary career, notably working alongside Björk, Kanye West, Rihanna or Solange. The talent of the leader of the Dirty Projectors is obvious with the eighth album of his band. Lamp Lit Prose arrives a year after Dirty Projectors and turns a page for the Dirty Projectors. Recorded in Ivo Shandor in Los Angeles, this is probably the catchiest, most playful and developed disc of the quintet. Love and women in general are important themes, notably on the pop title Break-Thru, probably echoing his divorce with Amber Coffman, the former singer of the band. Lamp Lit Prose also highlights its collaborations for a more eclectic work. Syd from The Internet on the electro pop Right Now and Amber Mark for more tropical colors on I Feel Energy. The Dirty Projectors don’t intend to erase their image, however. No, they enrich it with various sounds, give it more flavors and highlight rhythms that they didn’t dare to explore before. It’s a trust that has been built with time but also thanks to accomplished artists such as Empress Of, Robin Pecknold from the Fleets Foxes, the former Vampire Weekend Rostam or even Dear Nora. They juggle electro influences, English pop kitsch and soul spirit. Filled of keyboards, sax solos, a bit of jazz and flute layers around melodic voices, (I Wanna) Feel It All paints an atypical 60s landscape very similar to the album © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 10, 2019 | Domino Documents

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2017 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 19, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 11, 2003 | Western Vinyl

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 26, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 29, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 10, 2012 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2009 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 28, 2010 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2007 | Dead Oceans

Supposedly David Longstreth was on tour with the Dirty Projectors, the indie rock band he's been fronting since 2002, when he found himself thinking a great deal about Black Flag's epochal 1981 debut album, Damaged. Given the many miles Black Flag racked up criss-crossing America during their bloody heyday, that shouldn't be at all surprising, but rather than picking up a new copy of the album and cranking it up in celebration of his fellow road warriors, Longstreth channeled his thoughts in a different direction -- after coming home from the tour, he took the Dirty Projectors into a studio and covered 11 of Damaged's 15 tracks, all without giving himself or his musicians a refresher course on what they sounded like. The result, Rise Above, reimagines Black Flag's ragged hymns of rage and angst into smart but fractured bursts of wiry guitar (imagine King Sunny Ade after ten cups of coffee) accompanied by breathy, ethereal vocals, occasional interjections of strings and woodwinds, and a precise but flexible rhythm section. While these interpretations stray a considerable distance from Black Flag's originals, what's most surprising is how much of the original frameworks of these songs remain -- the melodies, such as they are, can generally still be recognized, and if the pissed-off howl of Henry Rollins is the polar opposite of Longstreth's vocal style, the contrary message of the songs somehow shines through. On one hand, Rise Above could be used as an example of how Longstreth can take nearly any music and make it his own, but at the same time it doesn't sound like he's forgotten the original intent behind this music for an instant. Damaged was a scream of defiance in the face of a grim and unforgiving world, but on Rise Above the Dirty Projectors use the curious beauty of their music as a protest against the ugliness of a violent and corrupt society. Perhaps even more than Henry Rollins, when David Longstreth sings "we're fighting a war that we can't win" in "Police Story," he wants more than anything to make a world where that isn't the truth, and it's moments like this that make Rise Above a brave and ultimately successful experiment. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 6, 2004 | Western Vinyl

The prolific experimental pop collective the Dirty Projectors return with Slaves' Graves & Ballads, their third album in a year. Originally, the album was released as two EPs early in 2004, but despite the high-concept nature of each of the EPs, all of the songs fit together well, making the album cohesive as well as diverse. The first half of Slaves' Graves & Ballads features Dave Longstreth backed by a ten-piece chamber group he founded called the Orchestral Society for the Preservation of the Orchestra. While this could seem pretentious coming from many other artists, the sense of drama the chamber group brings to Longstreth's distinctive crooning and cryptic lyrics ("the way a logo is different from an icon") actually makes it more immediate than some of the Dirty Projectors' other music. The combination of the sweeping strings, woodwinds, and brass with Longstreth's small, keening voice throws each element into even sharper contrast. The mix of majesty and intimacy in songs like the oddly alert, anticipatory "On the Beach" and "Slaves' Graves" may be theatrical, but it's distinctly emotional too; "(Throw On) The Hazard Lights" and "Hazard Lights (Reprise)" recall the primitive grandeur of The Glow, Pt. 2-era Microphones, with even more fraying around the edges. As with all Dirty Projectors music, things feel like they're on the edge of collapse. Acoustic guitars waver between delicate plucking and atonal strumming, woodwinds recorded far into the red take on feedback-like qualities, percussion punctuates the songs at unexpected moments, and Longstreth's often-garbled warbling can tend to grate. Still, the orchestral arrangements on Slaves' Graves feel like a natural resting place for the Dirty Projectors' lyrical and musical voice. The second half of Slaves' Graves & Ballads takes a very different tack, stripping the arrangements down to mostly just Longstreth's voice and guitar, with the odd bit of playful multi-tracking here and there (which works especially well on the lovely pop of "Because Your Light Is Turning Green"). This approach isn't as immediately striking as Longstreth's earlier orchestral experiments, but it does highlight the strangely soulful, timeless feel of his melodies, especially on "A Labor More Restful," "Ladies, You Have Exiled Me," and "Obscure Wisdom" -- a song title that sums up Longstreth's aesthetic well. The Dirty Projectors are still something of an acquired taste, but Slaves' Graves & Ballads is proof enough that Longstreth's twists and turns are worth following. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 5, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 25, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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