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Jazz - Released March 23, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

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Jazz - Released March 17, 1997 | ECM

4 stars (out of 5) - "...the mood overall is quiet and pensive....Saluzzi commands attentive listening with a collection of pieces that strike deep emotional chords....should be required listening for lite jazz cats aspiring to break through superficialities..." © TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 15, 2010 | ECM

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Jazz - Released March 23, 2007 | ECM

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Jazz - Released August 26, 2011 | ECM

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Jazz - Released July 10, 2009 | Intuition

Because Dino Saluzzi is an Argentine who plays the bandoneon, it is inevitable to compare him to Astor Piazolla. This comparison is unfair, however, because if Saluzzi is playing tango, it is so abstracted and transformed that we may as well just call it jazz. If a better comparison is sought it would be to another international jazz musician like Renaud Garcia-Fons. On Rios, Saluzzi plays with American bassist Anthony Cox and American vibist and arranger David Friedman, a musician who's run the gamut from Yoko Ono to Disney soundtracks. Together they play an assortment of tunes by members of the group, about half of them Saluzzi's, plus the one cover "My One and Only Love." The numbers are thoughtful but not flashy. Friedman's "Penta y Uno" is largely a deconstruction of bossa nova and tango, featuring percussion as well as vibes. Cox's "Jad" uses weird effects from the instruments and the occasional Arabic motif to build up to a subdued bop frenzy. Other tracks are more straight-ahead combinations of the primary instruments. This is music for the patient and thoughtful listener. Competent but not destined to be a classic. © Kurt Keefner /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 27, 2003 | ECM

The music throughout this set, which consists of Dino Saluzzi originals, is quite charming. The combination of Saluzzi's bandoneon, acoustic guitarist José Maria Saluzzi, and bassist Palle Danielsson works quite well, and both the arranged and improvised ensembles are melodic. Some of the music consists of modern tangos and there are also ballads and more jazz-oriented pieces. The mood is sometimes wistful and nostalgic, but it is not derivative of the past. A delightful set. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 7, 2005 | ECM

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Jazz - Released September 1, 1983 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 1, 1989 | ECM

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Classical - Released October 19, 1998 | ECM New Series

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Jazz - Released March 1, 1986 | ECM

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Folk/Americana - Released March 1, 1978 | RP Music

Jazz - Released August 1, 2008 | West Wind

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Jazz - Released May 14, 2010 | ECM

Despite his long history with ECM Records, Argentinian composer and bandoneon master Dino Saluzzi has never released a live recording until now. These four new compositions are separate but equal parts of a larger work; in essence, the concerto that is El Encuentro. They were recorded with the Metropole Orchestra under the direction of conductor Jules Buckley for NPS Radio in the Netherlands. The soloists are Saluzzi, his brother Felix on saxophone, and cellist Anja Lechner. El Encuentro ("The Meeting") is a series of musical short stories that ultimately become an entire narrative. The opening work, "Vals de los Dias," is a waltz that, in the beginning, lets its colors get shaped by strings bowed and plucked, overlapping in a dark, harmonic swirl before Saluzzi enters to play just the skeletal melody with traces of a folk song before they take over again; only this time, they evoke the composer's notion of tango. Lechner makes a brief appearance before the entire string section begins a melancholy series of recollections of the aforementioned melody, and Saluzzi returns in earnest. The composition eventually moves through progressions and regressions until it reaches a dramatic climax. "Plegaria Andina" borrows a theme from an earlier Saluzzi album, Andina, from 1988. Here it is bandoneon and saxophone that introduce the piece, with Lechner entering just behind them, creating a mournful, restrained interplay that lays the foundation for a much more elegiac backdrop when the orchestra joins them about halfway through. Together they plumb a depth that frames the narrative that the remainder of the work rests upon. It is simple, yet poetic and deeply moving. "El Encuentro," the title composition, is filled with numerous textures, nuances, and timbres. It is abstract and declamatory with a beautiful middle section where Saluzzi solos in counterpoint with himself. The work concludes with "Miserere," where fragmentary melodies of folk songs and Argentinian popular song are touched upon with reverence and a proper sense of nostalgia. But this the notion of absence is ever present in Saluzzi's playing in the piece. The orchestra, by contrast, moves from pastoral meditations to sweeping washes of romantic innocence to sorrowful, near-droning abstraction as Saluzzi and orchestra come toward one another in a dialogue that is filled with loss and memory, tenderness and resignation, that ultimately becomes a broken, fragmented, but finally joined-together whole. © Thom Jurek /TiVo