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Soul - Released January 1, 1970 | Motown

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Soul - Released January 1, 2002 | Motown

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Her self-titled debut LP (later retitled Ain't No Mountain High Enough after the single became a hit) was arguably her finest solo work at Motown and perhaps her best ever; it was certainly among her most stunning. Everyone who doubted whether Diana Ross could sustain a career outside the Supremes found out immediately that she would be a star. The single "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" remains a staple in her shows, and is still her finest message track. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Soul - Released May 22, 1980 | Motown

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Soul - Released May 29, 2020 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released January 1, 2012 | UNI - MOTOWN

This self-titled release, issued in February 1976, was Diana Ross' first album since December 1973's Last Time I Saw Him. It followed Ross' starring role in the Berry Gordy-directed Mahogany. That film's theme, a sweeping Gerry Goffin/Michael Masser ballad sung by Ross, topped Billboard's Adult Contemporary and Hot 100 charts; though it appeared on the Mahogany soundtrack, it was also included here and leads a set that's as diverse as Last Time I Saw Him, with a total of nine songs involving 16 songwriters. "I Thought It Took a Little Time (But Today I Fell in Love)," a stately ballad with a commanding chorus, was a Top Five Adult Contemporary hit but wasn't nearly as successful with R&B radio. "Love Hangover," with its extended lead-in and hurtling and thumping yet graceful groove, was Ross' entry into the disco market, where she proved to be a natural fit, and it not only topped the dance chart but the R&B and pop ones as well. "Kiss Me Now" is another highlight, a frisky, showbiz jazz number where Ross feels free enough to throw in a quick impression of Louis Armstrong. That covers the album's first side. Side two is much more focused, generally sticking to contemporary soul. "One Love in My Lifetime," yet another one of Ross' Top Ten R&B singles, is the most notable of the five songs, with the Ashford & Simpson-penned "Ain't Nothin' But a Maybe" a close second. Subsequently mired in a couple unfocused patchwork recordings, Ross wouldn't make another truly fine album until The Boss, written and produced in its entirety by Ashford & Simpson. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Soul - Released October 26, 1973 | UNI - MOTOWN

By the early '70s, Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye were in completely different creative territories. Ross was settling down as a professional diva, while Gaye was pushing his art forward with What's Going On, Trouble Man, and Let's Get It On. What they shared, apart from a mutual admiration, was that they were two of the biggest artists on Motown and that their voices sounded terrific together. So it wasn't entirely surprising that the duo teamed up in 1973 for the Diana & Marvin album. Although the album didn't produce any timeless classics, the results were still very good -- good enough for the record to be one of Ross' best efforts of the era. The highlights are the three singles ("You're a Special Part of Me," "My Mistake (Was to Love You)," "Don't Knock My Love"), but even the weaker tunes are redeemed by the duo's indelible chemistry, and that's the reason why it's worth a listen. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2003 | UNI - MOTOWN

Diana Ross would probably be offended by anyone who called her 1980 smash Diana a comeback, but let's face it -- after the flop of The Wiz, and the way that the disco revolution steamrollered so many of her Motown compatriots' careers, that's exactly what it was. Wisely hooking up with Chic's Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards (both the most traditionally rooted and most fearless of the major disco-era producers), Ross sounds more forceful than she had in years. The helium-toned style of her early hits with the Supremes is worlds away from the assertive way she rips into the funky hit "Upside Down." Even better, the joyous, celebratory "I'm Coming Out" is probably the best solo track of her career, and the heartfelt "Now That You're Gone" is one of her most subtle ballads. The glossy Chic production might sound a bit dated to some ears, but it's matured much better than many similar albums of the era. Overall, this is, in many ways, Diana Ross' best solo record. © Charity Stafford /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2000 | Motown

Diana Ross is certainly a diva of goddess-like proportions. Whether joined by the Supremes, or out on her own, her voice is unmistakable and powerful, plus she possesses the uncanny ability to take songs penned by others and make them very much her own -- to imbibe them with her very soul. This collection of Ross' best-known and loved hits is perfect testament to her massive gift. Working closely with both singer/songwriting duo Ashford & Simpson, as well as producers Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards (both of Chic), Ross brought six songs to the top of the pop charts over a decade -- all included here. From the early classic gospel-inflected "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" and the empowering chest beater "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," to the lite soul of "It's My House," Ross demonstrates full range. Also featured are the massive club hits "Upside Down" and "I'm Coming Out," cut with Rodgers and Edwards. Strong and up-tempo, both songs became disco manifestos across the country in the early '80s and helped to keep the genre alive just a little bit longer. And, of course, this compilation is completed, naturally, with both the sultry throb of "Love Hangover" and the Lionel Richie duet "Endless Love." If there is a failing at all, it is within the "Medley (With the Supremes)." This glossy track hits the highlights, but really, why butcher such amazing songs? Any one would be better off slipping a Supremes greatest-hits onto the old turntable. But for the casual listener, this probably hits the spot. It's heavy on the chart-toppers, and a sweet sonic masterpiece by anyone's standards. © Amy Hanson /TiVo
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Soul - Released May 23, 1979 | Motown

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Soul - Released January 1, 1971 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released October 26, 2018 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released June 22, 1973 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released January 1, 1973 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released January 1, 1973 | UNI - MOTOWN

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By the early '70s, Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye were in completely different creative territories. Ross was settling down as a professional diva, while Gaye was pushing his art forward with What's Going On, Trouble Man, and Let's Get It On. What they shared, apart from a mutual admiration, was that they were two of the biggest artists on Motown and that their voices sounded terrific together. So it wasn't entirely surprising that the duo teamed up in 1973 for the Diana & Marvin album. Although the album didn't produce any timeless classics, the results were still very good -- good enough for the record to be one of Ross' best efforts of the era. The highlights are the three singles ("You're a Special Part of Me," "My Mistake (Was to Love You)," "Don't Knock My Love"), but even the weaker tunes are redeemed by the duo's indelible chemistry, and that's the reason why it's worth a listen. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 2006 | Motown

For soul fanatics, the Motown archives are the musical equivalent to the Wonka building in Charlie & the Chocolate Factory. Every twist and turn is filled with the possibility of resuscitation, preservation, and in some instances surprise discoveries. Such is the case with Blue, which was supposed to be the follow-up album to Diana Ross' wildly successful Lady Sings the Blues, but was shelved when Motown maestro Berry Gordy took Ross back in a more pop direction with Touch Me in the Morning. This direction, while proving successful at the time, is unfortunate, as the performances on Blue rival (and in some instances best) the performances on Lady Sings the Blues. A few of these tracks would later see the day on other albums ("Little Girl Blue" on Touch Me in the Morning and "Smile" on Diana Ross in 1976) but with alternate vocal takes and mixes. But Ross' portrayal of Billie Holiday was effective; it wasn't just a carbon copy reenactment of Holiday, but a cultivation of her essence when placed on-stage or in the studio behind a microphone. Gil Askey's arrangements are top-notch without sounding like dinner theater knock-offs. Blue is an album every bit as bold an artistic statement as her contemporaries Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye, who were recording the opuses Where I'm Coming From and What's Going On around the same time, and for Ross fans, Blue is every bit as enjoyable as her sultriest moments as the supreme Supreme. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 1, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Fresh from her career-defining role in the Supremes, Motown issued Diana Ross' Everything Is Everything in 1970, within months of her self-titled solo debut of earlier the same year. This time, veteran Motown multitasker Deke Richards was brought in with hopes of equaling the unqualified success that the staff team of Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson had with Diana Ross -- particularly the songs "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" and "Ain't No Mountain High Enough." Rather than drawing exclusively from their stable of in-house writers, Richards split the duties between himself and a variety of Hitsville U.S.A. stalwarts -- including Berry Gordy and Marvin Gaye -- as well as significant outside input from the likes of John Lennon-Paul McCartney, Burt Bacharach-Hal David, and fellow Motor City soul stirrer Aretha Franklin. The upbeat opener, "My Place," swings steadily behind the frisky rhythm section -- replete with Jack Ashford's signature timekeeping on tambourine. Sprightly strings underscore Ross' similarly agile and inviting lead vocals. In deference to the pink glamour shot adorning the front, Ross reveals an earthier image on the funky "Ain't No Sad Song." It is a perfect example of producer Hal Davis' ability to capture the essence of the singer's sensuality, a feat he repeated to even greater effect a few years later on his production of the R&B/pop crossover chart-topper "Love Hangover." The infectiously cheery "Everything Is Everything" has the slightly quirky feel of a Laura Nyro composition, although it was actually written by a female friend of Berry Gordy. The Marvin Gaye-Anna Gaye co-penned "Baby It's Love" is one of several outstanding deep cuts flawlessly blending the unmistakably vintage Motown sound with a comparatively modern arrangement. The Beatles remakes show contrasting sides to Ross' talents: "Come Together" pulls no punches with an extended brassy and sassy reading, directly contrasted by the empathetic and heartfelt take of "The Long and Winding Road." Ross and Richards' sultry collaboration on Aretha Franklin's "I Love You (Call Me)" make for the finest contribution here from either participant. Although Everything Is Everything failed to exceed -- or even meet -- the chart achievements of its long-playing predecessor, many enthusiasts consider it to be a worthy companion. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Soul - Released November 27, 2015 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released February 17, 1981 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Released January 1, 2004 | Motown

Through 1964 to 1967 the Supremes were Motown's biggest act. Singles like "Where Did Our Love Go," "Back in My Arms Again," and "You Keep Me Hanging On" defined the label's pop prowess and the quirky appeal of talented lead singer Diana Ross. By 1968, the group not only lost member Florence Ballard, but also Holland-Dozier-Holland who had written and produced all of their big singles. Cindy Birdsong joins Mary Wilson and Ross for this 1968 effort and the group name was officially changed. Although it's always fun to hear Ross and the Supremes, the most interesting thing about this effort is its production. With a lack of consistently great songs, Love Child had to rely on hooks, choruses, and production values rather than magical songs. The well-produced and controversial title track proved how good Ross is with melodrama. "How Long Has That Evening Train Been Gone" has a great bassline from James Jamerson and Ross oddly having a lot of fun with her supposedly dire romantic prospects. The warm cover of Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers' classic "Does Your Mamma Know About Me" sticks close to the original with good results. Ashford and Simpson offer two of their early tracks, the album's first single "Some Things You Never Get Used To," and the graceful "You Ain't Livin' Until You're Lovin'." For the most part, Love Child's tracks seem to run together but this offers the late-'60s Motown sound without gimmicks and is more than recommended. © Jason Elias /TiVo
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Soul - Released September 16, 1977 | Motown

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