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Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
While Daniil Trifonov has established his reputation as a versatile pianist, demonstrating in his concerts and recordings an aptitude for the music of Frédéric Chopin, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, and Sergey Rachmaninov, his talents for virtuosic brilliance and fantastic speed, as well as his deeply reflective character, seem ready-made for Franz Liszt's Transcendental Etudes, S. 139. This 2016 Deutsche Grammophon release shows Trifonov in his element, executing the most difficult passages with extraordinary flair, while reserving his lyricism and introspection for Liszt's poetic meditations. For a taste of Trifonov's brilliance, try track five of disc one, the famous Feux follets, which Trifonov plays with dazzling technique and a light touch. Also included in this double CD are Liszt's Two Concert Etudes, S. 145, the Three Concert Etudes, S. 144, and the Grandes Études de Paganini, S. 141, which make up the second CD. An example of Liszt's poetic side can be found in track five of disc two, Un Sospiro, in which sparkling arpeggios are merged with a long-breathed melody, characteristic of Liszt's passionate Romanticism. For a special treat, try the final track, Paganini Etude No. 6, which is a set of variations on Niccolò Paganini's most famous Caprice in A minor, which many composers have exploited. These recordings were made in September 2015 at the Siemensvilla in Berlin, and the acoustics of the concert room provide appropriate resonance for Trifonov's powerful playing, yet his softest notes are clearly audible in these superb recordings.
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
First you think : “here we go... yet agaaaaain another recording of Chopin’s two concertos”, then you read ‘world premiere’ in the description. Surprising, isn’t it? And yet, this is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth! This world premiere is describing the brand new orchestrations realised by Mikhail Pletnev. These re-orchestrations give prominence to the much more chamber-like aspect of the accompaniment, which admittedly is a little pale and formulaic in the version that we’ve known for almost two centuries. Pletnev has moderated the music score, thinning out some parts while not changing a single note: the piano part remains the same, and in the orchestra nothing changes apart from the instrumental assignation. In addition to those two concertos that are much more colorful, the pianist Daniil Trifonov offers us a handful of tributes to Chopin by his peers and successors: Schumann, whose admiration for the Polish composer wasn’t reciprocated, Grieg, Barber and Tchaikovsky, and most of all Mompou’s splendid series of Variations on a Theme of Chopin. New from old, but always for the best we won’t hasten to add. © SM/Qobuz
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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 11, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Daniil Trifonov's journey around the world of Rachmaninov is at an end. The pianist has arrived safely into the harbour with Yannick Nézet-Seguin's Philadelphia Orchestra. This finale was inspired by the bells which are ubiquitous in the Great Russian soundscape. Alain Corbin explained their importance to the rhythmic and symbolic scansion of everyday life in 19th Century France in his book Village Bells. To the historian's analysis, we can now add the testimony of the pianist – who, like Rachmaninov, grew up in Novgorod. Russian bells leant Russian music its nobility and colouring of folk nostalgia. Daniil Trifonov hasn't forgotten this, as is clear from his piano transcription of the first episode of Les Cloches. He was wise enough to respect the operatic power of the score and the splendour of its orchestration: harp, celesta and flutes are all truly transformed into bells in the hands of a musician who stays true to the aura of disquieting oddness (with its shades of Edgar Allen Poe) which surrounds the first movement. His technique matches his capricious and bubbling imagination. While we might find ourselves yawning a little at the Vocalise, the first and third Concertos move us from thrilling ecstasies to tears of pleasure. A very fine record, in which the orchestra, perhaps a little distant, fulfils its role as a soundbox for the soloist. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 28, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The long-awaited new album from Daniil Trifonov is finally here! It comes fully dedicated to the music of Rachmaninoff, and, more specifically, to his three cycles of variations for piano. First of all, we have the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43, a late work composed in the summer of 1934, which stands as one of Rachmaninoff’s great scores, alongside the Third Symphony, The Bells, the Liturgy of St. Chrysostom , and the Symphonic Dances. For this recording the Philadelphia Orchestra, working under the leadership of Yannick Nézet-Séguin, focus on the young Russian virtuoso with rapt attention, who then proceeds with another of the Russian composer’s great cycles, the underappreciated Variations on a Theme by Chopin , whose main theme resumes on the opening bars of the 20th Prelude of Op. 28, in C minor. Rachmaninoff designs from a highly polyphonic basis a work of rare complexity, and shape, through its harmonies. He has Chopin in mind, of course, for his lyrical side (Variations 6 and 21), but also J.S Bach (Variation 1), and Schumann – for the big Finale – whose epic touch ghosts the Symphonic Studies Op. 13. This partition, which allowed Trifonov to remove some passages, is believed by some performers to be an immense lyric poem in which notes turn literally into words (notably Jorge Bolet, and his magical phrasing, for Decca in 1986!). Others wish to unify it, like the young Trifonov himself, whose gesture is aimed primarily at a sense of fluidity. After a relatively brief, bright, tribute to Rachmaninov composed by the pianist himself, the album closes with the famous Variations on a Theme by Corelli, which is in fact the theme of "La Follia", which was used ceaselessly in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, all over Europe. © Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 8, 2015 | Narodowy Instytut Fryderyka Chopina

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Classical - Released March 1, 2013 | DUX

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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
There's a lot packed into this double-CD set by Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov. The album is entitled Chopin Evocations, but it consists of more than that. There are the two early piano concertos, premiered in new orchestrations by Mikhail Pletnev, who plays the role of conductor this time out. There are three actual Chopin compositions, two of them rather rare. And there are four pieces that could indeed qualify as Chopin evocations, although one of them, the Nocturne of Samuel Barber, was explicitly designated as an homage to Chopin's model in the nocturne genre, Irish composer John Field. So, it's sort of a mixed bag, but what makes it work is that Trifonov is an excellent Chopin interpreter, and that much of the music is extraordinarily interesting. The Pletnev orchestrations can certainly be debated, but there have been suggestions since the 19th century that the original orchestrations were not entirely Chopin's own, and others, including Alfred Cortot, have tinkered with the music. Pletnev's versions leave the piano part alone and slim down the orchestra, creating a more varied, transparent texture, and they work reasonably well. The chief interest is found in some of the less commonly encountered works, most of all the Variations on a Theme by Chopin of Catalan composer Frederic Mompou, a set of variations that fascinatingly weaves in and out of the melodic material and tonality of the original (the Prelude in A major, Op. 28, No. 7) and quotes a different work, the Fantaisie-Impromptu, in the middle (this work is also included). Sergei Babayan, another member of Trifonov's circle, joins him for an especially brilliant performance of the youthful and difficult Rondo for two pianos in C major. The program may be connected only by the general relevance of Chopin, but the music is consistently interesting.
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Classical - Released July 12, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 8, 2015 | Narodowy Instytut Fryderyka Chopina

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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released December 6, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Daniil Trifonov in the magazine