Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$10.99
CD$7.99

Chamber Music - Released March 18, 2016 | Onyx Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
The three violin sonatas on James Ehnes' and Andrew Armstrong's 2016 release on Onyx Classics were composed between 1915 and 1919, the first being Claude Debussy's Violin Sonata in G minor, followed chronologically by Ottorino Respighi's Violin Sonata in B minor and Edward Elgar's Violin Sonata in E minor. These works, along with the Berceuse of Jean Sibelius, which dates from the same period, were composed in the midst of World War I and its grim aftermath, yet there is little in these pieces to show the trauma of that war and the hardships it brought. Indeed, they resist categorization as "war sonatas," and instead reflect the late Romanticism of the belle époque, rather than the modernism of the same time period. Because these works share lush harmonies, gentle moods, and more or less conventional tonality, they are accessible to listeners today who crave a traditional approach in their chamber music. Even so, these pieces have fallen into relative obscurity, notwithstanding their obvious appeal, so Ehnes and Armstrong have performed a valuable service by making them available on this album. Their performances are highly expressive and tinged with melancholy and nostalgia, which are appropriate for the style, though there isn't a trace of sentimentality. Onyx provides clear and roomy sound, and the recording captures every note, even in the softest passages. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Classical - Released June 1, 2005 | Onyx Classics

Pascal Rogé has finally begun his recording cycle of the complete Debussy piano works with this disc of the two books of preludes. As expected, it is as well done as one could hope. Rogé effortlessly shapes the music in these preludes, making them evocative and in some cases, giving them character. Les collines d'Anacapri are delightfully animated, La cathédrale engloutie has moments of breathtaking stillness, and Hommage à Samuel Pickwick is very humorously pompous. Yet for all the dimension that Rogé puts into these, which is picked up completely by the excellent sound, there is a consistency in the proportions and a reliability in his tone that tell you unmistakably that these are by Debussy. It's an auspicious start for Rogé and the new label Onyx. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Classical - Released February 1, 2007 | Onyx Classics

As beautiful a disc of Debussy's piano music as could be imagined, Pascal Rogé's second disc in his series of recordings of the master impressionist's piano music is as sublime as his first. Far more than his Debussy recordings for Decca from nearly 30 years earlier, Rogé's 2007 disc is intense, concentrated, and consistently inspired. His Estampes are amazingly evocative, his Children's Corner is incredibly affectionate, his Arabesques are charmingly insouciant, and his Suite Bergamasque is palpably sensuous. It goes without saying the Rogé's technique is up to the demands of the music -- his control of every aspect of piano playing is manifest in the elegance of every melody, in the balance of every harmony, and in the motion of every rhythm -- but unlike some of his contemporary countrymen. Rogé is far more a poet of the piano than a virtuoso of the keyboard and his performances breathe the air of the nights in Granada, glow with the radiant light of the moon, and dance with the swirl of the snow. Superbly recorded with lifelike fidelity for Onyx by the masterful Marijke de Villiers, this disc will please even those finicky Debussy fans who only approve of Michelangelo, Arrau or, in a pinch, Pollini. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Chamber Music - Released June 3, 2013 | Onyx Classics

The two-piano arrangement of orchestral music remained a commercially viable form until the advent of recordings, and even beyond. This recording by the veteran French team of Pascal and Ami Rogé includes several works originally written for two pianos: Ravel's Rhapsodie espagnole and Ma mère l'oye (Mother Goose Suite), the latter better known in its orchestral version, and Saint-Saëns' underrated Scherzo, Op. 87, whose use of whole-tone scales shows that Debussy was not alone in breathing that wind from the east. The rest of the music was arranged, but these are equally "authentic." The lovely arrangement of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune was made by Debussy himself, contemporaneously with the publication of the orchestral score, and that of Fêtes is by Ravel and captures the firework effects of the original in ingenious ways. Best of all is the remaking of Debussy's La mer, which is by the Rogés themselves and gets a startling variety of shades out of the two pianos. The pianists perform all this music very well, as you might expect, keeping the dynamics in the moderate-to-low range as befits the domestic uses of such arrangements. The sole complaint is the sound; Onyx's engineers, working in the small Salle de musique hall in Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, seem to have been similarly aiming at an intimate atmosphere, but the results are muddy and diffuse. This is nevertheless an item that will give pleasure to duo-piano fans. © TiVo