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Ireland - Released November 22, 2019 | Sony Music Ireland

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Pop/Rock - Released April 17, 2009 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released May 28, 2001 | Columbia

It's tempting to think of This Is the Day as a compromise between Christy Moore's starkly contrasting two previous records. The 2001 effort certainly takes a more traditional approach than its daring U2-esque techno Celt predecessor Traveller (1999), but the arrangements here are still far more expansive than those on the threadbare self-produced album Graffiti Tongue (1996). This record, a three-producer collaboration between Moore, Donal Lunny, and Declan Sinnott, blends soft acoustic folk instrumentation with healthy doses of atmospheric electric guitar. Ultimately, however, This Is the Day has far more in common with early-'90s projects like King Puck and Smoke and Strong Whiskey than with either of Moore's most recent albums. It recalls King Puck especially strongly with its gentle, mellow tone and reflective lyrics. In fact, at least one track here, "So Do I," actually was a discarded outtake from the King Puck sessions. In some respects, the record comes as a bit of a disappointment following three outstanding releases (beginning with 1994's Live at the Point) that really showed the singer at his effusive and dynamic best. And one wishes that Moore had done more songwriting this time out, as the political ballads "Veronica" and "Scallcrows" are the only originals on the album. But This Is the Day is nonetheless a solid piece of work, thoughtfully constructed and performed with plenty of Moore's customary expressive flair. © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Folk/Americana - Released November 17, 2017 | Columbia

This 24-track live collection sees Irish singer/songwriter Christy Moore performing a selection of numbers from his back catalog. Recorded on tour, the album features hits such as "Joxer Goes to Stuggart," "Ride On," and "Delerium Tremens," to name but a few. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released September 19, 1994 | Columbia

In 1997, persistent heart trouble prompted Christy Moore to announce his retirement from live performance. Two years later, he was able to return to the stage briefly before a recurrence of the illness forced him to cancel all scheduled appearances, acknowledging again that his days as a live performer were probably over. If so, the Irish folk world's considerable loss is mitigated slightly by the fact that Christy's masterful 1994 concert album Live at the Point remains as a testament to his extraordinary gift for entertaining audiences. Moore has always been the sort of artist who records albums in support of his live act, not the other way around. A lot of his songs are written with an audience in mind, as was the opening "Welcome to the Cabaret," heard here in a smoldering rendition that makes the 1990 studio recording seem tepid in contrast. It is one of many laugh-out-loud funny performances on the record. Among the others are the anti-drinking song "Delirium Tremens" (in which Moore bids "goodbye to the port and brandy, to the vodka and the stag"), the football fan ballad "Joxer Goes to Stuttgart," and the clever, political satire "The Knock Song," about an unlikely airport in small town Ireland ("Did NATO donate the dough me boys?"). These rollicking comic numbers are interspersed with passionate political anthems ("Go, Move, Shift" "Natives") and quiet traditional ballads ("Black is the Colour," "Cliffs of Dooneen"). There is an energy, a joie de vivre to this recording that is sometimes missing from Christy's studio albums. It captures one of the greatest talents in Irish folk at peak form -- something live audiences may never be able to see again. © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 9, 1991 | Rhino

A powerful CD featuring "Ride On," "City of Chicago, " "Lisdoonvarna, " and "Among the Wicklow Hills." This one is so good it can make his other good ones seem weak. © Chip Renner /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released August 5, 2002 | Columbia

Live at Vicar Street came as an unexpected precious gift to Christy Moore's fans, who had reason to believe that the 1994 recording Live at the Point would be Moore's final concert album. But fortunately, Moore's 1999 announcement that heart disease would force him to retire from live performance proved premature. This record preserves for posterity the series of low-key Vicar Street performances that began within two years of that announcement. Apparently, Moore wasn't ready to give up gigging after all. Nobody complained. If Live at Vicar Street is any indication, Moore's strategy was to take it easy on his ailing ticker by toning down the dynamic comic energy that dominated Live at the Point and focusing on his vast catalog of Irish ballads. It would be disingenuous to say that the energy isn't missed here, though Moore does perform spirited renditions of "Continental Ceilidh," "Lisdoonvarna," "Johnny Don't Go," and "Biko Drum." But the relaxed and thoughtful atmosphere of the record provides a showcase for Moore's sensitive vocal interpretations, which are evocative and sometimes -- especially on "First Time Ever" -- breathtaking. He is joined on every track by Donal Lunny and Declan Sinnott, the two men who produced his previous studio album. But this is emphatically not a live version of that record. "Johnny Don't Go" is the only This Is the Day song to make the live CD, and the collaboration between the three is more productive in this setting than it was in the studio. Their arrangements are simple but inventive and arresting, providing a three-dimensional backdrop that helps Moore to explore his quiet side in a mellow but vibrant environment. © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released March 22, 2007 | Sony BMG Music UK

Christy Moore is one of the celebrated veterans of Irish music, someone who's deservedly a bit of a legend in his own lifetime. He's tried a lot and often succeeded, and even when he hasn't, he's never been afraid of pushing again. But this CD, well into his career, is a contender for one of his best. He's eclectic in his choice of material, veering from the delicate airiness of Richard Thompson's "Beeswing" to Morrissey's "America I Love You" or "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" and managing to invest each of them with the weight of his own personality. He inhabits the songs and brings them alive with true spirit. It's a measure of what he does right that you listen to his version of Phil Ochs's "Changes" (the second time he's recorded it) and realize it stands tall besides the original. But not everything is shot through with seriousness: both "Magic Nights in the Lobby Bar" and "Sixteen Fishermen Raving" having a touch of raucous, warm jubilation about them. Throughout, Moore is in great voice, never seeming strained, and the spare backing highlights the quality of his singing and emotions here. An outstanding disc from a great performer. © Chris Nickson /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released March 23, 2006 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released September 2, 1996 | Columbia

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Pop - Released March 19, 2004 | Sony Music UK

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Folk/Americana - Released November 13, 2020 | Universal Music Ireland Ltd.

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Pop/Rock - Released February 14, 1994 | Columbia

The quality of the songwriting on Smoke & Strong Whiskey is comparable to most of Christy Moore's records, but the album suffers from overproduction. Producers Walter Samuel and Avert Abbing drown Moore's traditional Irish songs in electric guitars, electric pianos, synthesizers, saxophones, and horns. The lavish production is better-suited to some songs than others. "Burning Times" and "Blackjack County Chains" benefit from the dark slide guitar and Hammond organ treatments. But more often, the effect is either overbearing ("Welcome to the Cabaret") or outright hokey ("Encore"). The title track attempts to fit characteristically sharp-tongued Christy Moore lyrics ("Dia le hEireann suckle the empire, Dia le hEireann suffer the loss of the green to the blue while the media feeds on the blood and the pain and the hatred") into a twinkly, adult contemporary Mary Black arrangement. The most well-written tracks might be "Welcome to the Cabaret" and Shane MacGowan's "Fairytale of New York," but both are available in stronger versions on the 1994 album Live at the Point. Less devoted fans are probably better-served to pick up the live set and skip Smoke & Strong Whiskey. © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released September 27, 1999 | Columbia

It is perhaps not coincidental that Christy Moore's last albums of the '90s, recorded as he struggled with the possibility that poor health would force him to retire from live performance, rank among the best of his career. Traveller is a lushly produced foray into the previously uncharted territory of U2-esque technopop. Many of the songs on Traveller are traditional Irish favorites that have appeared in more conservative arrangements on previous Moore albums. Producer/engineer/programmer/keyboardist Leo Pearson plays a significant role in crafting every track, gracefully blending his synthesizers, drum machines, and electric guitars (including some played by U2's The Edge) with healthy doses of uileann pipe, bouzouki, bowran, flute, and acoustic guitar. The results are occasionally strained, but always fascinating and often brilliant. "Last Cold Kiss" is a chillingly executed tragic ballad that allows Moore to sing a duet beyond the grave with a recording of his father, Andy Moore, who died in 1956. Another highlight is "The Sirens Voice," a powerful and startlingly original indictment of Irish callousness toward immigrant refugees from Somalia. Throughout the album, the cultural clash afforded by the juxtaposition of modern musical technology with time-honored folk tradition is used to profound effect; it underlines the emotional and spiritual alienation of contemporary life and adds weight to timeless questions of mortality and justice. If this album is the result of Moore's retirement from concert performance, then it hasn't been a total loss. © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Folk/Americana - Released April 27, 1997 | Columbia

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Folk/Americana - Released June 15, 1972 | Universal Music Ireland Ltd.

Guests include Andy Irvine, Liam O'Flynn, Donal Lunny, and Kevin Conneff. It's a collector's item, mainly because it was the album that spawned Planxty. © Steve Winick /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released March 30, 2006 | Columbia

King Puck is a pleasantly mellow Irish folk record. It was apparently recorded as a result of a collaboration between Christy Moore and the ubiquitous Irish music guru Donal Lunny. Moore explains in the liner notes that "during 1992 Donal Lunny and I initiated arrangements on a large body of songs. Some of the notes we played and some of the ideas we had are to be found on this album." The conceptual approach behind most of the arrangements seems to be to take it slow and easy. Moore adopts a hushed vocal tone throughout; sometimes, as on the mournful "The Two Conneellys," he sings so quietly that the volume has to be raised in order to hear him. Even the faster comic numbers are handled with unusual restraint. The soft and lilting guitar and accordion arrangement of "Sodom and Begorra" lends witty understatement to lines like "Salthill after dark is like Sodom and Gomorra/ There's people doing things tonight that they'll regret tomorrow." Moore picks up the pace on "Johnny Connors" and the subsequent instrumental title track, but never compromises the album's light mood. The only song that seems in need of a brisker treatment is the 13-minute finale, "Me and the Rose." It is a charming and funny bit of storytelling that was clearly written with live performance in mind. In fact, the last verse was recorded at a 1991 concert in Dublin, and features an enthusiastic crowd singing along to a well-known Irish folk tune. It's a little jarring to hear the crowd after ten studio tracks; "Me and the Rose" might have come off better if the whole song included crowd response. As it is, Moore seems a little lonely. The experience is a bit like listening in on a rehearsal. Even so, it's a pretty great rehearsal, and it makes a fine capper to an album full of gems, like the beautiful cover of Jackson Browne's "Before the Deluge." © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 20, 2016 | Columbia

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Folk/Americana - Released October 28, 2011 | Sony Music Entertainment

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International Pop - Released August 16, 2019 | Christy Moore