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Ambient/New Age - Released October 29, 2012 | Elektra (NEK)

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2012 | Elektra (NEK)

There aren't many full-effort, front-to-back brilliant Christmas albums, but CeeLo's Magic Moment is one of them. Released ahead of a televised holiday special -- what Mr. Green hoped would be the first of an annual occurrence -- it covers all the bases. Sure, many over-familiar songs are interpreted for the umpteenth time. Who needs more "White Christmas," "Silent Night," and "Run Rudolph Run," right? However, there's so much joyous energy in the performances that one wouldn't be surprised to learn that Green has been plotting this move since Goodie Mob signed to LaFace. Green and company also tackle later material, crossing the '70s (Donny Hathaway's "This Christmas"), '80s ("Mary, Did You Know," popularized by Katty Mattea), and '90s (Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas"). The most natural fit is a rendition of "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch" that features a cappella group Straight No Chaser. At the other end, Green pulls off Joni Mitchell's somber "River" in convincing fashion. The overriding spirit is festive, exemplified by "All I Need Is Love," a rollicking blast that incorporates the Muppets and their "Mah Na Mah Na." Rod Stewart, Trombone Shorty, and Green's fellow Voice coach Christina Aguilera are also in on the fun. This is Christmas music that can be enjoyed by those who otherwise loathe it. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Soul - Released April 10, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Pop - Released November 6, 2015 | Atlantic Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2010 | Radiculture - Elektra

"Fuck You," the feel-joyously-spiteful hit of summer 2010, should cast a large shadow across Cee Lo Green's third proper solo album. The singer's biggest solo single to date, it's the best form of novelty hit -- a side-splitting surface supported with a durable underbelly, combining Millie Jackson-level lyrical frankness with a knockout throwback-soul production. Even without the presence of "Fuck You," The Lady Killer would remain a thoroughly engrossing album. Bookended by a recurring spy-film theme, the set is loaded with a potent mix of Green's singular voice -- meaning his graceful bellow and his oddball personality -- and knowing, hefty soul arrangements sheathed in hip-hop vigor, often embellished with strings, horns, and substantive background vocals. As with 2004's Soul Machine, some of the best songs here share titles with R&B classics. The testimonial "Wildflower" switches between corny/winking couplets ("Sexy is in season/Share your sunshine with me") and amusing metaphor play ("Hold her with both my hands/Put her right on my table when I get her home"). The infectiously beaming "Fool for You," served with a choppy gait, carries as much pride as Ray Charles' "A Fool for You." "I Want You," yet another song that punches and swirls, isn't as straightforward as its title suggests; it's about pressing the reset button on a dying relationship. The final full song, "No One's Gonna Love You," is a cover -- not of the S.O.S. Band, but of Band of Horses. It's a faithful version that humbly spotlights the versatility of a fascinating talent. Just as importantly, it's a suitable way to follow "Old Fashioned," a tear-the-roof-down ballad drenched in reverb and sweat. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2010 | Radiculture - Elektra

"Fuck You," the feel-joyously-spiteful hit of summer 2010, should cast a large shadow across Cee Lo Green's third proper solo album. The singer's biggest solo single to date, it's the best form of novelty hit -- a side-splitting surface supported with a durable underbelly, combining Millie Jackson-level lyrical frankness with a knockout throwback-soul production. Even without the presence of "Fuck You," The Lady Killer would remain a thoroughly engrossing album. Bookended by a recurring spy-film theme, the set is loaded with a potent mix of Green's singular voice -- meaning his graceful bellow and his oddball personality -- and knowing, hefty soul arrangements sheathed in hip-hop vigor, often embellished with strings, horns, and substantive background vocals. As with 2004's Soul Machine, some of the best songs here share titles with R&B classics. The testimonial "Wildflower" switches between corny/winking couplets ("Sexy is in season/Share your sunshine with me") and amusing metaphor play ("Hold her with both my hands/Put her right on my table when I get her home"). The infectiously beaming "Fool for You," served with a choppy gait, carries as much pride as Ray Charles' "A Fool for You." "I Want You," yet another song that punches and swirls, isn't as straightforward as its title suggests; it's about pressing the reset button on a dying relationship. The final full song, "No One's Gonna Love You," is a cover -- not of the S.O.S. Band, but of Band of Horses. It's a faithful version that humbly spotlights the versatility of a fascinating talent. Just as importantly, it's a suitable way to follow "Old Fashioned," a tear-the-roof-down ballad drenched in reverb and sweat. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Interscope

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 31, 2006 | Arista - Legacy

Uh-huh, this one had to come down the pipe. Sometimes, when a label seeks to cash in on one of its artists -- or former artists -- they put something together that might be needed but is wholly unexpected. What's more, they get it right. That's the case with Cee Lo Green's Closet Freak: The Best of Cee Lo Green the Soul Machine. It's the exception rather than the rule of best-of compilations: the contents are so fine there's no quibbling about what is here, which makes what may be left off easier to bear. Those not familiar with Cee Lo until they heard him fronting Gnarls Barkley on the smash single "Crazy," (Gnarls Barkley is a two-man project involving Cee Lo and producer Danger Mouse -- Brian Burton) from their creative and wacky debut album St. Elsewhere (the pop album of 2006), will be delighted by the material here. There are a total of three cuts from his days with the Atlanta rap group Goodie Mob, and generous selections from his two solo albums Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections, and Cee Lo Green...Is the Soul Machine. It's not the same by a long shot, but the root elements of that sound are all here. Cee Lo is eternally funky: he can sing, rap, and produce; that is in full evidence on this generous set of 17 cuts. His unmistakable voice can be heard on Goodie Mob 's "Free," "Soul Food," and "Cell Therapy." But it's on the solo material, from "Gettin' Grown," the title track, "I'll Be Around" (with Timbaland), the completely insane "Childz Play," (with Ludacris) and the acid-drenched psychedelic funk of "Under the Influence" (with Follow Me), that are a few of the standouts on this weighty slab of the good stuff. Whether this is a further introduction, or you've been with the Bald tattoed one for a decade, this is the way a best-of gets done. Pure pleasure for freaky people. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 26, 2002 | Arista

Breaking away from Goodie Mob for a major-label solo debut, Cee Lo follows the curious lead of OutKast, who had recently broken through big-time with Stankonia, and unleashes a willfully weird album that eschews rap clichés in favor of full-fledged songs that are more neo-soul than hip-hop. He'd always been more of a crooner than a rapper, of course, but the tattooed big man really lurches forward with his singing voice here on Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections, crossing Al Green's down-home soul singing with Rick James' freakishness. Touchstones only go so far, however, as Cee Lo is a free spirit if anything -- he goes out of his way to be himself and only himself here, to the extent that the album's commercial hopes seem questionable at best. That's not to say that Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections is an unsatisfying album per se. It's just that this is an edgy album, one that goes out of its way to challenge your expectations of what a major-label (neo-soul? Southern rap?) release should sound like. There's nothing prepackaged here, absolutely nothing. The lead single, "Closet Freak," is a good choice, but even that song is pretty far out-there and sounds unlike anything on the charts in 2002 sans OutKast. Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections is ultimately an album for folks who like their music creative, folks who like to hear an artist climb out on a limb and chase his muse, regardless of whether or not the result falls into any clear-cut genre boundaries. It helps, of course, if you like Cee Lo, because this is undoubtedly his show -- there aren't really any guest star producers, rappers, or singers here, just the big man himself center stage. Kudos to the head of Arista, L.A. Reid, for letting Cee Lo fly his freak flag with such freedom. It's not often you get a major-label release that's this daring and this colorful, surely not often enough. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 6, 2015 | Atlantic Records

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Pop - Released March 11, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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Soul - To be released June 26, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 2, 2004 | Arista

Cee Lo's debut album had been an interesting listen but resonated with very few listeners, so some changes were due for his second go-round, Cee Lo Green...Is the Soul Machine, which is indeed a drastically improved effort. Arista head honcho L.A. Reid had no doubt let Cee Lo fly his freak flag high and mighty for Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections (2002), for what resulted was an album that was, in a word, curious -- a sprawling carnival of Dirty South-inflected soul singing that knew no boundaries whatsoever, willfully professing its weirdness on out-there songs like the lead single, "Closet Freak," the closest Cee Lo came to crossing over commercially. In other words, cross over à la OutKast he didn't -- not by a long shot. In fact, most listeners took him at face value and wrote him off as a freak. It'd be a real shame if that happened again with Cee Lo Green...Is the Soul Machine. Sure, the big guy is still fairly weird here, but he's tastefully weird and, above all, focused this time. He's written a stronger batch of songs and has aligned himself with some of the best producers in the industry (the entire industry, that is): Timbaland and the Neptunes, most notably, and also Jazze Pha, Organized Noize, and DJ Premier. How he managed to rein in such a team of big-money producers is a good question (maybe the concurrently dismissed L.A. Reid can answer that one), but the result is nothing short of delightful. The album opens with a flawless run of radio-ready tunes -- "The Art of Noise" through "My Kind of People" -- and then spins off into a mélange of Cee Lo-isms: stream-of-consciousness spoken word-style raps that cut deep, stirred into kaleidoscopic musical arrangements that straddle the hip-hop and deep soul eras simultaneously, all of it utterly distinct from track to track, ultimately culminating all too soon at the 65-minute mark. Once again Cee Lo has recorded a peerless album, except this time he's recorded one that should connect, or at least deserves to. OutKast's Speakerboxx/The Love Below (especially André 3000's half) is probably the best touchstone you're liable to find this side of your imagination, in terms of not only style but also quality and vision. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 2, 2011 | Radiculture - Elektra

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1990 | Arista

Breaking away from Goodie Mob for a major-label solo debut, Cee Lo follows the curious lead of OutKast, who had recently broken through big-time with Stankonia, and unleashes a willfully weird album that eschews rap clichés in favor of full-fledged songs that are more neo-soul than hip-hop. He'd always been more of a crooner than a rapper, of course, but the tattooed big man really lurches forward with his singing voice here on Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections, crossing Al Green's down-home soul singing with Rick James' freakishness. Touchstones only go so far, however, as Cee Lo is a free spirit if anything -- he goes out of his way to be himself and only himself here, to the extent that the album's commercial hopes seem questionable at best. That's not to say that Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections is an unsatisfying album per se. It's just that this is an edgy album, one that goes out of its way to challenge your expectations of what a major-label (neo-soul? Southern rap?) release should sound like. There's nothing prepackaged here, absolutely nothing. The lead single, "Closet Freak," is a good choice, but even that song is pretty far out-there and sounds unlike anything on the charts in 2002 sans OutKast. Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections is ultimately an album for folks who like their music creative, folks who like to hear an artist climb out on a limb and chase his muse, regardless of whether or not the result falls into any clear-cut genre boundaries. It helps, of course, if you like Cee Lo, because this is undoubtedly his show -- there aren't really any guest star producers, rappers, or singers here, just the big man himself center stage. Kudos to the head of Arista, L.A. Reid, for letting Cee Lo fly his freak flag with such freedom. It's not often you get a major-label release that's this daring and this colorful, surely not often enough. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 19, 2011 | Radiculture - Elektra

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R&B - Released February 23, 2018 | The Right Records

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R&B - Released February 22, 2018 | The Right Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2011 | Radiculture - Elektra

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 9, 2003 | Arista

Cee Lo's debut album had been an interesting listen but resonated with very few listeners, so some changes were due for his second go-round, Cee Lo Green...Is the Soul Machine, which is indeed a drastically improved effort. Arista head honcho L.A. Reid had no doubt let Cee Lo fly his freak flag high and mighty for Cee Lo Green and His Perfect Imperfections (2002), for what resulted was an album that was, in a word, curious -- a sprawling carnival of Dirty South-inflected soul singing that knew no boundaries whatsoever, willfully professing its weirdness on out-there songs like the lead single, "Closet Freak," the closest Cee Lo came to crossing over commercially. In other words, cross over à la OutKast he didn't -- not by a long shot. In fact, most listeners took him at face value and wrote him off as a freak. It'd be a real shame if that happened again with Cee Lo Green...Is the Soul Machine. Sure, the big guy is still fairly weird here, but he's tastefully weird and, above all, focused this time. He's written a stronger batch of songs and has aligned himself with some of the best producers in the industry (the entire industry, that is): Timbaland and the Neptunes, most notably, and also Jazze Pha, Organized Noize, and DJ Premier. How he managed to rein in such a team of big-money producers is a good question (maybe the concurrently dismissed L.A. Reid can answer that one), but the result is nothing short of delightful. The album opens with a flawless run of radio-ready tunes -- "The Art of Noise" through "My Kind of People" -- and then spins off into a mélange of Cee Lo-isms: stream-of-consciousness spoken word-style raps that cut deep, stirred into kaleidoscopic musical arrangements that straddle the hip-hop and deep soul eras simultaneously, all of it utterly distinct from track to track, ultimately culminating all too soon at the 65-minute mark. Once again Cee Lo has recorded a peerless album, except this time he's recorded one that should connect, or at least deserves to. OutKast's Speakerboxx/The Love Below (especially André 3000's half) is probably the best touchstone you're liable to find this side of your imagination, in terms of not only style but also quality and vision. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo