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Jazz - Released July 13, 2018 | Artistry Music

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Jazz - Released July 18, 2006 | Artistry Music

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Jazz - Released August 25, 2009 | Mack Avenue Records

Brian Bromberg's fourth recording for the Artistry label, and first since they were acquired by the Mack Avenue label, is a fairly predictable program of contemporary jazz, commercial funk, and pop song covers, as well as uptown New York City R&B-type dance tunes that should appeal to the urban crowd. His prominent electric bass guitar always has a retro feel going back to Ralphe Armstrong, Marcus Miller, Stanley Clarke, Larry Graham, and James Jamerson, but retains a current-day feel that is still relevant, remaining skilled and precise as any bassist currently playing the amplified instrument. Many of these tracks include a horn section featuring Randy Brecker, Eric Marienthal, Gerald Albright, and Rick Braun, while keyboardists George Duke, Patrice Rushen, and Jeff Lorber join in here and there. While entertaining and even attractive from a melodic standpoint, Bromberg and his mates are reworking themes, beats, and songs without pushing the envelope, and make sure that the music is concise and constrained, and never boils over. The hippest selection is the opener/title track, very much in the Saturday Night Live neo-bop N.Y.C. funk and bop amalgam, with the horns blowing strong. Brecker's influence has a telling effect on this and the skunk funk "Elephants on Ice Skates." Bromberg instrumentally covers the B-52's' immortal hit "Love Shack" and perfectly renders the delightful, flute-driven, choogling theme from the television show Sanford and Son -- both are definite highlights of the CD. On several tracks, Bromberg enjoys playing a bass solo on intros to set up themes, but he employs a marvelous chordal approach on "The Mirror" unaccompanied. The rest of the material ranges from disco to make-out music, with the get-down dance funk of "Mr. Miller"; the string-laden version of "Heaven"; and a spicy Latin, authentically sexy "Martinis at the Velvet Lounge?," hopped up by Wes Montgomery-type guitar chord progressions. The recording wanes as it goes along in intensity and musical intrigue, but is another typical Brian Bromberg project that his fans will likely enjoy as the crafted production it is. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Jazz - Released May 24, 2005 | Artistry Music

In his career, Brian Bromberg has recorded bop, fusion, and smooth with equal fluency and creativity on acoustic and electric basses. Choices is somewhat commercial, with funky rhythms, R&B-ish solos, and fade-outs. In general, the solos are more memorable than Bromberg's originals and grooves. While the material is mostly routine, the improvisations of Bromberg and altoist Eric Marienthal are excellent and the musicianship is impressive. But no real surprises occur, making this a lesser and generally easy listening effort by the hugely talented Brian Bromberg. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released July 17, 2012 | Artistry Music

Booklet
On the flipside of the Bromberg Plays Hendrix album, which was released at the same time, bassist Brian Bromberg pays tribute to the Bossa Nova Master, Antonio Carlos Jobim. Bromberg employs Brazilian musicians and the Rising Sun Orchestra on six Jobim compositions and six Jobim-inspired originals. Unlike Bromberg's Hendrix release, these arrangements stick close to Jobim's original versions of "One Note Samba," "Wave," "Triste/Desafinado," "Corcovado," "Once I Loved," and "The Girl from Ipanema." On this release, Bromberg uses a nylon-stringed acoustic bass with piccolo tuning, which comes close to the signature breezy sound Jobim perfected on acoustic guitar. ~ Al Campbell
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Jazz - Released March 25, 2016 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released June 5, 2012 | Artistry Music

Booklet
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Jazz - Released July 17, 2012 | Artistry Music

Booklet
On Bromberg Plays Hendrix, bassist Brian Bromberg doesn't utilize the electric guitar at all, but it's hard to tell. A tribute to one of the world's most inventive guitarists could only be honored by doing something completely different from what is expected. Bromberg manages this on both acoustic and electric piccolo bass. Whether covering sonic blasts like "Fire" and "Purple Haze" or the melancholia of "The Wind Cries Mary," Bromberg and drummer Vinnie Colaiuta make this a worthwhile endeavor that stands up to repeated listening. ~ Al Campbell
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Jazz - Released September 27, 2005 | Artistry Music

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Jazz - Released February 22, 2005 | Artistry Music

Brian Bromberg, a highly versatile bassist who can play straight-ahead jazz, fusion, smooth, and adventurous music with equal skill, is a masterful tapper too. On this rockish fusion set, most of the selections have just Bromberg joined by drummer Joel Taylor. Bromberg utilizes an overdubbed piccolo bass like a guitar (so one would swear this was a guitar-driven power trio) in addition to his standard electric bass. Keyboardist Dan Siegel is on two numbers and drummer Tom McCauley subs for Taylor on one song, but otherwise all of the music is made by the two musicians. The results are nine rock-oriented originals played with plenty of spirit, passion, and fun in addition to the expected virtuosity. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released September 12, 2006 | Artistry Music

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Jazz - Released October 24, 2006 | Artistry Music