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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 7, 2013 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released December 8, 2004 | Mirare

Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique
This is about as appealing a disc of Rachmaninov's complete preludes for piano as one is likely to hear, but its impact may not be immediately evident. That caveat might at first seem a bit odd considering the first piece here is the famous Prélude in C sharp minor, one of the best known, as well as one of the loudest works the Russian composer ever penned, and one might reasonably expect that it would start the disc off with a bang. But Russian pianist Boris Berezovsky takes another approach to the work; rather than starting with the climax and trying vainly to get bigger and louder from there, he builds slowly and purposefully to a shattering climax that not only makes the performance, but redeems the piece from a century of brutal mistreatment. Berezovsky continues that approach throughout his performances, carefully and scrupulously sculpting each prelude, yet never skimping on passion, power, and energy, and ultimately delivering an effective and exciting set of performances. Though the digital sound of this 2004 recording is not quite as clear as it could be, it does have tremendous impact. © TiVo
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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 26, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Boris Berezovsky is one of these indomitable pianists who won’t restrict themselves to a set script, but rather let their instinct guide them. So plastic perfection is not the motto here. As shown by this new recording with one of the best Russian ensembles, the Svetlanov Symphony Orchestra. The concert’s programme, recorded live on April 8th, 2017, is very rich, combining Brahms’ Piano Concert No. 1 – with dimensions much more symphonic than simple concertantes – with a rarely performed partition: Stravinsky’s Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments. Berezovsky rightly assumes that live recordings are much more exciting than in the studio. Concerts taping, despite their inherent flaws – false notes, blunders, coughing, etc. − mirror life itself and manage to capture the energy flows between the stage and the audience. The pianist doesn’t confine himself to playing his instrument: in fact, he’s also conducting from the piano! “I wanted to approach works for piano and orchestra as if they were chamber music on a large scale; these two works share this chamber quality” he explains. A rather monumental experience for a most intriguing musical result. © SM/Qobuz
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Concertos - Released January 25, 2011 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released July 1, 1991 | Warner Classics International

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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 1, 2005 | Mirare

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Classical - Released September 1, 1996 | Warner Classics International

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Chamber Music - Released August 30, 2005 | Warner Classics International

Leopold Godowsky's "transcriptions" of Chopin's etudes are notorious for being technically difficult beyond the originals and, therefore, are rarely played, much less recorded, unless the pianist is a super-virtuoso like Marc-André Hamelin. Boris Berezovsky is another who has proven himself up to the task of successfully performing the fiendish studies. For this recital recording (the only indication of its live recording is the applause at the beginning and end), Berezovsky selected 11 of Godowsky's studies, and for all but two of them, he first played Chopin's etude before Godowsky's arrangement. This makes it much easier for the listener to understand the changes Godowsky made and the difficulties of their performance. It's obvious that he's inverted the arpeggios of Chopin's Op. 10/1 and that he's moved the running figures of Chopin's Op. 10/2 from the right hand to the left in his "Ignus Fatuus." Godowsky gave the Op. 25/1 a similar treatment, but gave the accompaniment even more filigree than Chopin. Berezovsky actually performs three of Godowsky's arrangements of the Etude, Op. 10/5. The first transposes the "Study on Black Keys" in G sharp major to a "Study on White Keys" in C major. The second transforms its meter and rhythm into a wild tarantella. The final version here is Godowsky's study called "Badinage," where the Op. 10/5 etude is ingeniously combined with the Etude, Op. 25/9. Berezovsky gives this last one a very appropriate glib and playful reading. He can play very softly and touchingly, as in the Etude, Op. 10/6 or Godowsky's mazurka version of the Etude, Op. 25/5, but there is always a sense of strength and conviction behind his playing. It's most striking in Godowsky's transcription for left hand alone of Chopin's "Revolutionary" Etude. Berezovsky's ability to separate the lines of music and his expert use of the pedals frequently make it sound as if he's using two hands, instead of just the one. His speed is minimally less than the original in these left-hand transcriptions, giving us amateurs comfort that even virtuosos have some weaknesses, even if it's not much of one. Berezovsky finishes the recital with Godowsky's sentimental favorite Alt-Wien and his transcription of Chopin's "Minute" Waltz, which gives the original some of that Viennese dancing glamour. It is an all-around very impressive recital, well planned, performed, and recorded. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 1, 1994 | Teldec

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Classical - Released January 8, 2010 | Mirare

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Classical - Released August 29, 2006 | Warner Classics International

According to conventional wisdom, the adjective that most aptly describes Hindemith's music is "dry," just about as damning an assessment as exists, barely a step up from "mind-numbingly dull" or "unlistenable." Who wants to listen to dry music? Hindemith was remarkably prolific, and it must be admitted that he perhaps wrote more than his share of dry music, but he also wrote music of great energy, expressiveness, and wit. Ludus tonalis -- a 50-minute cycle of 12 fugues, one in each of the major keys, connected by interludes and framed by a prelude and postlude -- is clearly related to the structure of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. As the largest and most ambitious piano piece by one of the twentieth century's leading composers, self-consciously modeled on a great monument of keyboard music, it's a work that demands to be taken seriously. The work's subtitle, "Studies in Counterpoint, Tonal Organization and Piano Playing," contributes to intimations of portentousness. The composer, however, deflects an overly serious assessment by the title he gives it, which can be translated as "Tonal Game," and games should be fun. Ludus tonalis is not the most consistently engaging of Hindemith's scores, but the moments that delight and astonish far outnumber the dry. It's not too broad a judgment to note that, in general, the slow movements hold less interest than the fast ones. Hindemith's harmonic palette in these works is fairly narrow, and he's not an outstanding melodist, so some of the slow movements sound like contrapuntal meandering. A significant element in the most compelling pieces here is his rhythmic inventiveness, which is considerable, and is most evident in the more energetic and propulsive fugues and interludes. One of the charms of these pieces is the wit and quirky sense of humor that Hindemith displays. A majority of the movements do sound playful, more like games than chores. Another attractive element is the brevity of the movements, most of which are under two minutes; they make their point and take their bows before wearing out their welcome. Several movements that leap out include the "Interludium tertium," with its faux-Baroque ornamentation, and the eccentrically bouncy themes of "Fuga quinta" and "Fuga nona." Hindemith's five-movement Suite "1922," Op. 26, fills out the disc. It's most notable for its "Ragtime" and the jazz-inspired "Shimmy," which occasionally sounds like Nancarrow and should be required listening for anyone still holding onto the cliché that Hindemith is dry. Boris Berezofsky offers solid performances that emphasize the expressiveness of the music and give attention to the detail that brings out the individuality of the movements. His playing has none of the perfunctory, notey quality that can make performances of Hindemith so deadly. He performs the Suite with abandon and apparent glee. Ludus tonalis reveals Hindemith in a much more reserved mood, but it would have been gratifying to hear more of the wildness of Berezofsky's performance of the Suite brought to some of the quirkier fugues and interludes. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released September 11, 2008 | Mirare

Russian composer and pianist Nikolay Medtner was of German background, was fluent in both Russian and German, and combined aspects of each musical tradition in music that was, by the standards of the early twentieth century, conservative, but without ever resorting to comfortable simplicities. Of Prokofiev, who helped him out on occasion, he said, "It is impossible for me to accept his music as art, or even as talent." The contemporary who admired him most was the supreme late Russian Romantic, Sergey Rachmaninov, and his pianism was nearly on a par with that of that towering figure. The curious billing on the album, with the name of pianist Boris Berezovsky in large print flanked by the smaller names of the singers, is fully justified by the major role played by the piano even in the vocal works recorded here. The Germanic side of Medtner's musical personality manifests itself in contrapuntal density, and the piano goes beyond accompaniment, even beyond equal partnership with the singer. These songs, mostly in Russian with a few in German, offer a good introduction to his style. The singers here, who are even pictured in an unusual soft focus, in the booklet photos, keep the volume down and the focus on the thick currents of Berezovsky's playing. Interspersed among the songs are piano pieces called Skazki, which literally means "tales," although the music is evocative rather than specifically programmatic (except in the Lisztia Campanella [Bells] from the Two Stories, Op. 20, track 25). Several are formidably difficult technically, but Berezovsky brings to them not only confidence but also flair. Medtner's music bristles with complexities that have denied him wide popularity, but people who get a grip on him tend to turn into confirmed fans. Both the mixture of pieces and the perforamances here are suited to the job of making new converts. All song texts, whatever their original languages, appear in German, English, French, and Russian, but the booklet notes lack the last of these. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released October 1, 2006 | Mirare

There are many factors that contribute to a great and worthwhile album; the actual performance (in this case by orchestra and soloist) is obviously important, but also significant is recorded sound quality, programming, interesting and informative liner notes, and (although less important) nice packaging doesn't hurt, either. This CD of Rachmaninov's First and Fourth piano concertos and the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini gives listeners all of these things. The liner notes provide an exceptionally useful timeline highlighting the chronology of two concertos, showing where revisions were made and when the final version emerged relative to the initial sketches. The Orchestre Philharmonique de l'Oural does a superb job of providing a lush and sensual backdrop for all three works heard here. The horn solos are quite lovely, the string playing sensitive and warm, and interplay between orchestra and soloist is always flowing and natural. Tchaikovsky Competition Gold Medal winner Boris Berezovsky is the brightest shining jewel of this album. His playing shifts deftly between elegant, flowing melodies; nimble and agile fast passages; and triumphant, powerful climaxes. The recorded sound is remarkably clear without becoming tinny. Truly, this recording has it all and would be a good addition to a larger collection as well as a fitting introduction to these works. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 24, 1992 | Warner Classics International

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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 10, 2008 | Mirare

After his Gold Medal win in the Tchaikovsky Competition, pianist Boris Berezovsky managed to consistently turn out one successful recording after another, proving over and over again that he has an incomprehensibly masterful technique coupled with a deep, sensitive musical understanding of the works he performs. This album of the Chopin piano concertos in the Mirare album, however, is a little bit of a misstep. This is not because of his own performance, which is deeply nuanced, technically precise, musically gratifying, and energetic throughout. The downside of this album is the actual recording quality and the orchestra with whom Berezovsky plays. Mirare's sound is muddy throughout the entire album, almost erasing Berezovsky's intricate playing in heavily scored sections. Chopin's orchestral writing is in no danger of winning any awards, and any orchestra that plays his sometimes-cumbersome tuttis with too much gravity and weight runs the risk of overshadowing the contrasting role the piano plays. This is unfortunately exactly what the Ensemble Orchestral de Paris does. Coupled with the muddy sound quality of the recording, this weighty playing in tutti sections translates into an unpleasant wash of sound. While Berezovsky's execution remains unimpeachable, listeners can only hope that he will one day choose to re-record these concertos under better circumstances. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released October 19, 2003 | LucasRecords

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Quintets - Released July 16, 1997 | Sony Classical