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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 4, 2002 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
British soul woman Beverley Knight has yet to be fully embraced by the record-buying public despite possessing perhaps one of the most phenomenal voices around. The disappointing chart performances of her first two albums, The B-Funk and Prodigal Sista, cemented the belief that while her talent is unquestionable, her material just isn't strong enough to propel her into the mainstream. This, however, should all change with Who I Am, a well-produced collection of contemporary R&B songs that is just as confident and self-assured as her more celebrated U.S. contemporaries. The feisty first single, "Get Up," sets the tone immediately, allowing Knight to show off her astonishing vocals amidst some slinky dancehall rhythms. Elsewhere, the funky "Same" channels '80s Prince just as convincing as OutKast, while "Whatever's Clever" is the kind of powerhouse R&B that En Vogue innovated in the early '90s. The ballads are just as strong. "Fallen Soldier," a tribute to murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence, is a stripped-down acoustic number filled with raw emotion; "Bestseller Mystery," with its slide guitar, sounds like a lost blues classic; and "Beautiful Contradiction" is a soothing soulful duet with Stevie Wonder sound-alike Musiq (Soulchild). Occasionally, the album veers into the kind of bland MOR territory that has often blighted Britain's more recent soul singers (Mica Paris, Shara Nelson). "Hurricane Jane" is rather monotonous, tune-free neo-soul, and "Gold"'s dated-sounding production positions Knight as more of a lounge singer than an accomplished R&B talent. But overall, Who I Am is still a colossal leap. After seven years of being an also-ran, Knight now has the material to back up her world-class vocals. The big time surely awaits. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 4, 2002 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
British soul woman Beverley Knight has yet to be fully embraced by the record-buying public despite possessing perhaps one of the most phenomenal voices around. The disappointing chart performances of her first two albums, The B-Funk and Prodigal Sista, cemented the belief that while her talent is unquestionable, her material just isn't strong enough to propel her into the mainstream. This, however, should all change with Who I Am, a well-produced collection of contemporary R&B songs that is just as confident and self-assured as her more celebrated U.S. contemporaries. The feisty first single, "Get Up," sets the tone immediately, allowing Knight to show off her astonishing vocals amidst some slinky dancehall rhythms. Elsewhere, the funky "Same" channels '80s Prince just as convincing as OutKast, while "Whatever's Clever" is the kind of powerhouse R&B that En Vogue innovated in the early '90s. The ballads are just as strong. "Fallen Soldier," a tribute to murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence, is a stripped-down acoustic number filled with raw emotion; "Bestseller Mystery," with its slide guitar, sounds like a lost blues classic; and "Beautiful Contradiction" is a soothing soulful duet with Stevie Wonder sound-alike Musiq (Soulchild). Occasionally, the album veers into the kind of bland MOR territory that has often blighted Britain's more recent soul singers (Mica Paris, Shara Nelson). "Hurricane Jane" is rather monotonous, tune-free neo-soul, and "Gold"'s dated-sounding production positions Knight as more of a lounge singer than an accomplished R&B talent. But overall, Who I Am is still a colossal leap. After seven years of being an also-ran, Knight now has the material to back up her world-class vocals. The big time surely awaits. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Pop - Released November 8, 2019 | Rhino

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Pop - Released June 10, 2016 | East West Records

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After a five-year gap, Beverley Knight returns with an album based around her love of the city regarded as the home of soul, Memphis, Tennessee. Her previous effort, 2011's Soul UK, paid tribute to the favorite home-grown soul music of her youth, but for Soulsville, the singer recorded the material at the famous Royal Studios in Memphis, based in the Soulsville neighborhood of the city -- the place the mighty Stax Records also called home. The album also features some hefty guest artists, such as Jamie Cullum, Jools Holland, and Memphis' own Sam Moore, of Sam & Dave fame. ~ Simon Spreyer
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Pop - Released June 10, 2016 | East West Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 24, 1998 | Parlophone UK

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Jazz - Released May 7, 2007 | Parlophone UK

Recorded in just five days in the deep south of Nashville, Tennessee, Music City Soul sees one of Britain's most accomplished urban talents, Beverley Knight, return to her roots following the underperformance of 2004's highly commercial Affirmation. Despite its recording location, the Wolverhampton diva's fifth studio album hasn't gone all country, but instead focuses on the Southern soul sounds of the '60s that influenced her early career. Whether it's a knee-jerk response to the disappointing sales of her "all-bases-covered" predecessor, or a genuine affectionate homage to the likes of Al Green, Sam Cooke, and Aretha Franklin, its 15 tracks are undeniably and authentically old-school, thanks to Mark Nevers' organic production, Knight's full-throttled soulful vocals, and an inspired choice of collaborators and song choices. The Rolling Stones' Ronnie Wood lends his guitar skills to three tracks, including the bluesy feel-good opener "Every Time You See My Smile," and an impassioned gospel take on his own band's 1964 hit "Time on My Side," Robbie Williams' former songwriting partner Guy Chambers offers his trademark melodic sensibilities to both "Black Butta," a rip-roaring slice of rock & roll which owes more than a nod to Ike & Tina Turner's "Nutbush City Limits", and the Aerosmith-goes-funk of "Saviour," while the achingly gorgeous "No Man's Land," a languid but luscious ballad which showcases a rarely seen fragile side to Knight's usual blistering vocal presence, is the album's stand-out track, co-written with Adele and Joss Stone cohort Eg White. But suffering the same fate as many of her releases, Music City Soul can't sustain the same standard throughout, as she fails to make her mark on pedestrian cover versions of Homer Banks' "Ain't That a Lot of Love" and Aretha Franklin's "Rock Steady," while the likes of "Tell Me I'm Wrong" and "Trade It Up" seem more concerned with replicating the period's vintage sound than providing any memorable hooks or melodies. Music City Soul may be one of the more credible Southern soul pastiches, but by looking to the past instead of focusing on the future, Knight is now in danger of surrendering her Queen of U.K. soul crown. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 28, 2004 | Parlophone UK

Hoping to build on the momentum gained by her Mercury Music Prize-nominated breakthrough album, Who I Am, Beverley Knight's fourth effort abandons her soul credentials and goes straight for the commercial pop jugular. Working with an array of collaborators including Coldplay's Chris Martin and Robbie Williams' ex-songwriting partner Guy Chambers, Affirmation clearly has one eye on dominating the airwaves as much as her biggest hit, "Shoulda Woulda Coulda," did two years previously. Indeed, lead single "Come as You Are" should have no problems finding its way onto radio playlists, its swirling keyboards, psychedelic guitars, and almighty chorus creating a Lenny Kravitz-meets-Pink pop/rock stomper. The inclusion of a cover, "Keep This Fire Burning," originally a hit for Robyn in her native Sweden, also signifies Knight's intentions -- its exuberant catchy pop is a million miles away from her urban roots but much more likely to score her a number one hit. Best of all is the Chris Martin-penned "The First Time," which shows that his dalliance with R&B on Jamelia's "See It in a Boy's Eyes" was no fluke. A gorgeous, gospel-inspired ballad, it's far removed from the epic stadium rock his day job is usually associated with. Lyrically, Knight is as daring as ever. "No One Ever Loves in Vain" is a subtle piano-driven confessional about the loss of a friend, while the melancholic "Salvador" addresses AIDS, showing that Knight's commercial sensibilities haven't hampered her ability to tackle big issues. Inevitably, with the attempt to cover several bases, Affirmation may alienate fans of her more soulful first two records. The over-produced likes of "Tea and Sympathy" and "Till I See Ya" dilute Knight's impassioned vocals, while "Supasonic" is perhaps one Prince homage too far. But overall, there are enough gems on here to suggest that Affirmation may achieve the commercial success it so obviously craves. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Jazz - Released May 7, 2007 | Parlophone UK

Recorded in just five days in the deep south of Nashville, Tennessee, Music City Soul sees one of Britain's most accomplished urban talents, Beverley Knight, return to her roots following the underperformance of 2004's highly commercial Affirmation. Despite its recording location, the Wolverhampton diva's fifth studio album hasn't gone all country, but instead focuses on the Southern soul sounds of the '60s that influenced her early career. Whether it's a knee-jerk response to the disappointing sales of her "all-bases-covered" predecessor, or a genuine affectionate homage to the likes of Al Green, Sam Cooke, and Aretha Franklin, its 15 tracks are undeniably and authentically old-school, thanks to Mark Nevers' organic production, Knight's full-throttled soulful vocals, and an inspired choice of collaborators and song choices. The Rolling Stones' Ronnie Wood lends his guitar skills to three tracks, including the bluesy feel-good opener "Every Time You See My Smile," and an impassioned gospel take on his own band's 1964 hit "Time on My Side," Robbie Williams' former songwriting partner Guy Chambers offers his trademark melodic sensibilities to both "Black Butta," a rip-roaring slice of rock & roll which owes more than a nod to Ike & Tina Turner's "Nutbush City Limits", and the Aerosmith-goes-funk of "Saviour," while the achingly gorgeous "No Man's Land," a languid but luscious ballad which showcases a rarely seen fragile side to Knight's usual blistering vocal presence, is the album's stand-out track, co-written with Adele and Joss Stone cohort Eg White. But suffering the same fate as many of her releases, Music City Soul can't sustain the same standard throughout, as she fails to make her mark on pedestrian cover versions of Homer Banks' "Ain't That a Lot of Love" and Aretha Franklin's "Rock Steady," while the likes of "Tell Me I'm Wrong" and "Trade It Up" seem more concerned with replicating the period's vintage sound than providing any memorable hooks or melodies. Music City Soul may be one of the more credible Southern soul pastiches, but by looking to the past instead of focusing on the future, Knight is now in danger of surrendering her Queen of U.K. soul crown. ~ Jon O'Brien