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Rock - Released December 15, 2017 | Sumerian Records

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After a very brief period of identity crisis and vocalist turmoil, the members of Asking Alexandria reintroduced themselves with prodigal frontman Danny Worsnop on the band's fifth full-length, Asking Alexandria. Produced by Matt Good (From First To Last), this eponymous return is the group's most polished effort to date, less raw and muscular than past albums. While this evolution might prove divisive to longtime fans, Asking Alexandria remains highly enjoyable, a triumphant offering that benefits as much from familiarity as it does from pure power and Worsnop's inimitable presence. Kicking off with a strong opening run of powerful anthems, Asking Alexandria wastes little time getting back into the groove with Worsnop. The urgent "Alone In A Room" highlights some new vocal directions -- perhaps inspired by Worsnop's work during his time away from the band -- which incorporate more '80s arena-rock singing than '00s metalcore screaming. Meanwhile on "Into the Fire" (co-produced by Korn's Jonathan Davis), the band reminds listeners that they can still pummel with a brutal grace, combining soaring gang choruses with Worsnop's blood-curdling bellows. "Eve" is the closest they come to old-fashioned viciousness, an epic explosion of demonic wails and chugging riffs. Yet, even through that brutality, Worsnop's vocal warmth on the chorus elevates the track to an arena-worthy singalong. Of the potentially contentious inclusions, "Hopelessly Hopeful" and "Rise Up" feature programming flourish one might find in a Top 40 pop song, reaching a peak on "When The Lights Come On," which could easily be mistaken for the heaviest Fall Out Boy song yet-to-be-written. Despite this mainstream sheen, these songs hit as hard as anything in their catalog; the true winner for most jarring moment comes with "Empire." Featuring Seattle rapper Bingx, this misstep completely pulls listeners from the flow of the album. On any other record, "Empire" could be passable, like an unholy alliance of Machine Gun Kelly teaming up with All Time Low. However, inserted at the close of an album that has made a point of throttling listeners with its might, it's an unwelcome and unexpected shift in tone that would have been better as a b-side or inclusion on a soundtrack of mash-up tunes. Overall, Asking Alexandria is a worthy return from the classic lineup, retaining the best aspects of its past and taking steps into its future. Regardless of a stumble or two, Asking Alexandria is well worth a listen. While The Black was a passable offering at a time when it seemed like it would be a permanent arrangement, this reunion simply feels right. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released March 25, 2016 | Sumerian Records

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There's something to be said about letting go. In 2015, after a period of internal turmoil and divisive creative differences about the band's direction, Asking Alexandria vocalist Danny Worsnop left the band. Founding member Ben Bruce describes it as a dark time -- for both morale and creativity -- that would inform the name of the metalcore quintet's fourth official album, The Black. After recruiting Denis Stoff -- an avowed fan and the former vocalist of Ukrainian band Make Me Famous -- the revived Asking Alexandria got to work on an album that would mark a return to form. Rather than writing a collection of diss tracks to trash a former colleague, the band chose to refocus and tap into the energy of the new creative unit, which resulted in an album that they could all support. Unlike their previous effort -- 2013's From Death to Destiny, an album weighed down by a heavy dose of '80s hair metal influence and a big change in Worsnop's vocal delivery, which rendered the band's signature sound almost unrecognizable -- The Black resurrects the hunger and passion of their debut, as well as the focus of its follow-up, Reckless & Relentless. Much like contemporaneous efforts by Bring Me the Horizon and Hands Like Houses, The Black presents Asking Alexandria at its most streamlined, melodic, and accessible. It also opens up the band's potential and shoots for the arena rafters with the addition of triumphant singalongs and cathartic lyrics (the rousing "The Lost Souls" stands out). Sure, the ferocity and energy are still here: explosive album-opener "Let It Sleep" bridges the gap between the Worsnop and Stoff periods, calming fan fears with a healthy dose of wild screaming, demonic bellows, and breakneck pacing that pummel like a street fight, while the wild pair of album closers "Undivided" and "Circled by Wolves" are energetic and breathless. Hints of the drama behind Worsnop's departure are present, but they are whisked away as quickly as they are introduced. So while the cathartic "Sometimes It Ends" opens with a scathing confessional from Bruce, it ends with the decision to focus on the band's future with Stoff, rather than dwelling on the past. Indeed, the album artwork -- which features a young girl holding her ground against a looming dark presence -- is Bruce's visualization of facing the scary and overwhelming and forging ahead. That renewed thirst benefits the band on blazing tracks like album highlights "The Black" and "I Won't Give In." There are moving moments of beauty here too, like on the plaintive "Gone," the uplifting "We'll Be Okay," and the wistful "Send Me Home," a metalcore millennial version of Seger's road-weary "Turn the Page." At one point, Stoff sings, "it's time to move on and just walk away." For a group who once presciently sang "the music's dead… let's wake it up," the sentiment rings truest on The Black. They've emerged from a quagmire that could have ended the band and ended up writing their tightest album yet. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Metal - Released August 6, 2013 | Sumerian Records

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It's a pretty common practice for bands to mature over time. As they get older and the rigors of touring set in, bandmembers eventually tire of writing about girls and drugs and move on to more personal songwriting. It's an inevitable part of life, and though modern metalcore has been immune for some time, it would seem time is finally starting to catch up with Asking Alexandria, who, in a move away from the electronic outbursts of their earlier work, push their sound toward hard rock with their third album, From Death to Destiny. Though the album still features plenty of the production flourishes and synth work that fans have grown used to, their uses here feel more a part of the music than some dance beats someone shoehorned in while the band chased down an unfortunate metalcore trend. And really, the metalcore parts of their sound have also been smoothed down considerably, resulting in a sound that feels more like actual songs than an excuse to string breakdowns together. These changes help to make From Death to Destiny easily the band's most focused and mature album to date, though they'll definitely be a shock to the senses for die-hard Asking Alexandria fans who weren't expecting them to put out a post-grunge-influenced hard rock album. Although From Death to Destiny might alienate some fans, the album's more grown-up sound gives them a newfound accessibility that is sure to open them up to a whole new audience hungry for some new heavy jams. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Metal - Released September 15, 2009 | Sumerian Records

This U.K.-based quintet is the second band with this name that guitarist Ben Bruce has formed. The original version of Asking Alexandria existed while Bruce lived in Dubai, but when he moved back to his native England, he re-formed the group with all new members but the same name. It probably doesn't matter; metalcore of this type can be played by pretty much anyone. Stand Up and Scream features all the sounds of today's angsty, floppy-haired youth: death growl vocals, clean vocals on the choruses, staccato guitar riffs, mosh pit-roiling breakdowns, and the latest addition to the formula, retro/analog synth lines oozing and humming through the mix. These guys are reminiscent of Bring Me the Horizon, in the sense that they're British imitators of a largely American subgenre that they don't quite have a grip on. Their songs are faceless and unmemorable; they have two tricks that separate them from the pack. One is the insertion of techno/rave breaks into the middle of their otherwise stomping songs, like the one that gets rolling about two minutes into "A Candlelit Dinner with Inamorata." They pull the same stunt on "Nobody Don't Dance No More" and "A Prophecy," and the short "Hiatus" is a straight-up dance track. Their other trick is to downgrade to ultra-emotive acoustic weeping, which they do on the ironically titled "A Single Moment of Sincerity" and a few other tracks. Overall, this isn't a terrible album, but it's not a great one, either, and committed metalcore fans aren't gonna enjoy the techno outbursts. © Phil Freeman /TiVo
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Metal - Released April 5, 2011 | Sumerian Records

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Metal - Released December 27, 2019 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released July 16, 2018 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released December 15, 2017 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released July 29, 2014 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released December 22, 2017 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released July 11, 2019 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released February 13, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released October 25, 2017 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released May 28, 2018 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released March 4, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 21, 2011 | Sumerian Records

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Metal - Released September 22, 2017 | Sumerian Records

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Hard Rock - Released May 11, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Hard Rock - Released April 15, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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