Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$7.49

Latin America - Released April 10, 2020 | Zoho

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released August 21, 2015 | Motema Music, LLC

Hi-Res
HI-RES$7.99
CD$5.99

Latin America - Released September 15, 2017 | Motema Music, LLC

Hi-Res
CD$7.49

Latin America - Released January 1, 2005 | Zoho

Despite the Young Lion movement of the '80s, '90s, and 2000s, jazz isn't nearly as youth-obsessed as rock, dance-pop, or rap. Jazz is full of talented people who were late bloomers in some respect -- singers and instrumentalists who spent considerable time in the shed and might have been 35, 40, or even older the first time they composed original material, landed a recording contract, or recorded an album as a leader. Arturo O'Farrill certainly didn't start recording as a leader right away; the acoustic pianist was in his late thirties when, in 1999, he provided his first album as a leader, Blood Lines. Although Arturo O'Farrill is the son of the late bandleader/arranger/composer Chico O'Farrill, he didn't inundate listeners with Afro-Cuban rhythms on Blood Lines; he used them more sparingly than Poncho Sanchez, Tito Puente, or Machito. And the same is true of Live in Brooklyn, a post-bop/hard bop disc that was recorded in a New York City club called the Up Over Jazz Café in 2003. These performances find O'Farrill forming an acoustic piano trio with bassist Andy Gonzalez and drummer Dafnis Prieto; all three of the musicians have Latin credentials, but even so, Afro-Cuban elements are used in moderation when they're used at all. In fact, one needs to pay close attention to hear the Latin influence when the trio turns its attention to Wayne Shorter's "Footprints" and Gonzalez's "Vieques." Other highlights of this 56-minute CD range from Thelonious Monk's "Well, You Needn't" and Horace Silver's "Peace" to two abstract Carla Bley compositions: "Utviklinsang" and "Walking Battery Woman." Live in Brooklyn falls short of exceptional, but it's a decent and noteworthy document of O'Farrill and his colleagues on-stage in 2003. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
CD$7.49

Latin America - Released February 8, 2011 | Zoho

For over 60 years, big bands have been the exception instead of the rule in jazz -- and that is very much a matter of economics. It is a lot easier to pay four, five, or six musicians than it is to pay 19 or 20 musicians. But there are still some great big bands if one knows where to find them, and acoustic pianist Arturo O'Farrill's Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra has been offering excellent big-band Latin jazz since 2003. O'Farrill's outfit celebrated its seventh anniversary in 2010, which was also the year in which 40 Acres and a Burro was recorded. This fine album (which boasts guest Paquito d'Rivera on clarinet) is a perfect example of why O'Farrill calls his big band the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra instead of the Afro Cuban Jazz Orchestra; O'Farrill favors a pan-Latin approach, demonstrating that Afro-Cuban music isn't the only type of Latin music that can have a positive effect on acoustic jazz. Certainly, Afro-Cuban rhythms are an important part of the equation; the Afro-Cuban influence serves the orchestra well on material ranging from O'Farrill's "Ruminaciónes Sobre Cuba" (Ruminations About Cuba) to the Abelardo Valdés standard "Almendra" to Dizzy Gillespie's "A Night in Tunisia." But O'Farrill ventures into Brazilian jazz territory on interpretations of Pixinguinha's "Um a Zero" and Hermeto Pascoal's "Bebê," and his big band combines jazz with Argentinian tango on Astor Piazzolla's "Tanguango." But the biggest surprise of all comes when the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra puts a somewhat bolero-ish spin on the traditional Irish-Celtic standard "She Moves Through the Fair"; it's an unlikely choice for a jazz band, but this arrangement successfully unites post-bop, Celtic, and Latin elements with absorbing results. In a perfect world, it wouldn't be difficult for jazz musicians to keep a big band together. But some big bands will excel despite the difficulty, which is exactly what O'Farrill's Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra does on 40 Acres and a Burro. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released May 6, 2014 | Motema Music, LLC

Hi-Res
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Latin America - Released August 18, 2017 | Motema Music, LLC

Hi-Res
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2017 | Motema Music, LLC

Hi-Res
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released June 29, 2012 | Zoho

Arturo O'Farrill made a name for himself by following in his father's footsteps, leading a Latin big band and small groups, and writing arrangements and originals for them. But this 2011 session is his first playing solo piano, alone in the Noguchi Museum on Long Island after hours, with his favorite artist's work for inspiration. O'Farrill begins with an elaborate improvisation he called "The Sun at Midnight," which blends elements of classical music, Cuban jazz, post-bop, and more into a stunning performance. "Once I Had a Secret Meditation" is a brilliant re-imagination of the standard "Secret Love," a dramatic, shimmering effort that is reminiscent of some of Aaron Copland's writing for piano, especially in its hymn-like conclusion. His reworking of the 19th century minstrel song "O' Susanna" transforms the piece into a turbulent, harmonically rich showpiece worthy of comparison to Art Tatum's recordings. Randy Weston's "Little Niles" has long been a jazz standard, though O'Farrill gives this African-flavored work his personal stamp, mixing Cuban accents into the bassline while retaining the essence of the piece. The pianist finds the great Cuban classical composer Ernesto Lecuona's "Siboney" to be fertile ground for improvisation as well, embellishing its infectious melody with a lively touch. "Oh Danny Boy" was a favorite of Tatum as well, and O'Farrill's elaborate Latin interpretation is no less impressive, taking it well from its expected path. Perhaps the biggest surprise is the finale, a playful take of Charles Mingus' "Jelly Roll," an unjustly neglected work dedicated to a now-overlooked early great. O'Farrill's rendition starts out sublime but has rousing and playful moments. While Arturo O'Farrill has shown great success leading a big band and small groups, he needs to set aside additional recording dates for future solo piano projects. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
CD$7.49

Latin America - Released October 1, 2009 | ZOHO Music L.L.C.

Arturo O'Farrill's latest album is a family affair of sorts: his wife, Alison Deane, plays piano on three tracks, while his teenaged sons Adam and Zachary play trumpet and drums, respectively, on another. Throughout the disc, the music is a mix of funk, Latin, and swing grooves with fierce, technically adept, but ultimately soulful and exuberant soloing, particularly by trumpeter Jim Seeley and alto saxophonist David Bixler, while O'Farrill himself maintains hypnotic montunos and rock-steady soul-jazz grooves on the piano and Fender Rhodes. The third track, "Blue State Blues," features a bass duo/duel between Ricky Rodriguez (acoustic) and Boris Koslov (electric), with O'Farrill offering surprisingly avant-garde comping behind. The album's climax comes with the two-part, 15-minute "Tabla Rasa," which creates a head-spinning Cuban bop blend in its first half and in its second features a guest appearance by tabla master Badal Roy, who played with Miles Davis in the early '70s and has enjoyed a long fusion career since. He's surrounded by a Balkan-sounding violin, flute, some vocal chanting, and a whole bunch of other elements that somehow manage to cohere -- much like the rest of the album. Risa Negra isn't quite jazz, and it isn't quite Latin jazz -- it's more, and better, than either of those narrow categories. © Phil Freeman /TiVo