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$9.99

Electronic/Dance - Released May 25, 2007 | Shitkatapult

Having made a considerable splash with the Ellen Allien collaboration Orchestra of Bubbles, Apparat returned to his own path with Walls, a remarkable album that ranks as his best yet. Beginning with the gentle string and vibes beats of "Not a Number" -- which in its own melancholy way, combined with the title, suddenly sounds like one of the most humanistic songs yet recorded, passionate in its elegant sorrow -- Walls takes a simultaneously familiar and unsettled path. While the continuing impact of disparate strands of music -- the fallout of My Bloody Valentine and its many imitators, the electronic obsessions of Warp, the stadium-ready melancholy of early Radiohead and its own horde of followers -- has resulted in a 21st century computer music of crushed sorrow; on Walls, Apparat transcends the downbeat limitations of the incipient form with astonishing grace. Hearing how what could be a standard filter-house volume build in "Limelight" becomes a fierce trap for a voice barely understandable, or how the post-Jeff Buckley/Thom Yorke woundedly sweet vocal on "Arcadia" actually means something working alongside the busily frenetic beats make the listener regard familiar approaches in a sudden new light. Meantime, "You Don't Know Me," which appears towards the album's conclusion, might actually be the best song on it. While there are a lot of songs that could be described as soundtracking a nonexistent film, this actually feels like it, strings and a handclap beat creating a pitch-perfect atmosphere to the end of a romantic movie. Raz Ohara's various vocal appearances throughout are nice additions but the highlight is "Hold On," where his perfectly in-the-moment R&B style contrasts the squelching bass and nervous but righteous groove to a T. ~ Ned Raggett
$12.99
LP5

Electronic/Dance - Released March 22, 2019 | Mute

After Moderat announced their indefinite hiatus in 2017, Sascha Ring went back to his solo career as Apparat. LP5 is the follow-up to 2011's The Devil's Walk, Ring's most song-oriented solo work, rather than the last album to bear Apparat's name, 2013's more challenging Krieg und Frieden (Music for Theatre). The title of LP5 ostensibly nods to Autechre's 1998 full-length, which it doesn't resemble in the slightest. Ring has stated that his experience with Moderat, which ended up touring major venues, inspired him to think big with his own music, but here he refrains from writing quirky, crowd-pleasing electro-pop tunes like Moderat's "Bad Kingdom." Like all of Apparat's albums since 2003's Duplex, LP5 is filled with live instrumentation as well as Ring's fragile, yearning vocals, which are refreshingly not over-emotive. The songs seamlessly blend electronic and acoustic textures, with waves of Fennesz-like guitar fuzz lapping over dusty pianos, swelling strings, and glowing horns. The drums often sound played rather than programmed, and they range from the drum'n'bass-like patter of "Dawan" to the post-dubstep skip of "Heroist." Ring lets the songs flow as they need to, going by feeling rather than shoehorning them into conventional song structures. "Caronte" begins with ear-perking staccato strings that are striking but not too dramatic, and just as its seems like it's building up to a soul-stirring climax, it curiously dissolves into lush strings and intimate acoustic guitar plucking for a brief moment. Then it starts building up again, with Ring's modulated vocals singing either "never find" or "never fight," and it percolates into a more intense, bass-smeared beat. Closing number "In Gravitas" has perhaps the greatest contrast between dynamics, beginning with two minutes of free-floating space and Ring's passionate vocals before a shuffling beat eventually slams in, forging a path that ends up at a bizarre spoken word passage. As expected from Apparat, LP5 is an ambitious, inventive album which runs on its own intuition, fusing studio wizardry with honest expression to frequently thrilling results. ~ Paul Simpson
$15.49

Electronic/Dance - Released October 23, 2015 | Shitkatapult

$8.99

Electronic/Dance - Released October 25, 2010 | !K7 Records

The selections on Sascha Ring's contribution to the !K7 label’s DJ-Kicks series date back to the early ‘90s, but there’s technically no looking back on the part of the DJ/producer. They’ve all been “recently discovered.” The majority of this set does originate from 2006-2010, incorporating lean dubstep and streamlined techno with a couple outliers. 69’s “Rushed,” released by Carl Craig in 1993, is easily the most physical and intense of the lot. Strangely, it’s deployed as the second track in the sequence. Very shortly thereafter, the mix switches from charging to relatively sedate -- alternately melodic and abstract material suited more for home listening than clubbing. A handful of the highlights come off newer dubstep/post-dubstep 12" releases: Cosmin TRG's scuffling “Tower Block,” Ramadanman’s pinging/churning “Tempest,” and Joy Orbison's buoyant “The Shrew Would Have Cushioned the Blow” (the latter two of which were included on Scuba’s earlier Sub:Stance mix). Ring’s own “Sayulita,” an exclusive, is one of his most evocative, dynamic productions of late, full of space and percussive friction. ~ Andy Kellman
$8.49

Electronic/Dance - Released January 21, 2005 | Shitkatapult

Silizium is as long as an album, but there are nearly as many remixes as original mixes, so it appears to be designed more like an EP of stray tracks or a brief compilation. It's neither. Instead, the first five tracks work together as a single piece. For this part of the disc, recorded for a John Peel session, producer Sascha Ring is joined by vocalist Raz O'Hara as well as a cellist, a violinist, and a clarinetist. As a whole, it brings Apparat closer to the kind of emotionally incisive chamber IDM nearly perfected by Telefon Tel Aviv on Map of What Is Effortless. It's only fitting that Telefon Tel Aviv are brought in to perform one of the remixes, and their spin on "Komponent" isn't radically different, though it is just as effective. Bus, Rechenzentrum, and Ring provide the other alternates. ~ Andy Kellman
$10.99

Electronic/Dance - Released August 25, 2003 | Shitkatapult

You have to give a nod of the head to Apparat for Duplex. In a year when the market has been flooded with glitch madness, Apparat (aka Sascha Ring) offers up a full length that stands apart from most in terms of sheer quality. Duplex is melodic and emotional like Telefon Tel Aviv, but without the cleanliness for which TTA is known. This is dirty and raw without all of the digital fuss that most IDM producers toil long and hard to achieve, and Apparat pulls it off with deceptive simplicity. Digital mosquitoes flickering and fluttering throughout the opening track ("Granular Bastard") and haunting vocals that recall classic Peter Gabriel on "Contradiction" help to drive home that this is going to be anything but predictable. It's glitchy, but doesn't subscribe to many of the basic tenets that plague the glitch/microhouse subgenres, and listening to the album in its entirety can be an exhilarating and inspiring listen, or a completely exhausting one depending on your state of mind before popping the CD in the tray. But either way, Duplex stirs the gamut of emotions so deeply and honestly that it's hard to walk away and not feel something. And after all, isn't that what of the core principles music (and art) are supposed to provide? ~ Rob Theakston
$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 22, 2019 | Mute

$11.99

Electronic/Dance - Released April 4, 2008 | Shitkatapult

"Apparat's own remixes level out the material at his disposal without paving over or obliterating it, dicing and recoating the tracks in his own image and yet, in so doing, lending them a sober, minimal Techno dignity..."
$3.99

Electronic/Dance - Released January 23, 2008 | Shitkatapult

$9.99

Experimental - Released August 20, 2001 | Shitkatapult

$12.99

Electronic/Dance - Released February 19, 2013 | Mute

$3.99

Electronic/Dance - Released February 18, 2002 | Shitkatapult

$4.49

Electronic/Dance - Released May 4, 2007 | Shitkatapult

$4.49

Electronic/Dance - Released February 24, 2006 | Shitkatapult

$2.99

Electronic/Dance - Released November 8, 2010 | !K7 Records

$5.49

Electronic/Dance - Released March 15, 2004 | Shitkatapult

$8.99

Electronic/Dance - Released October 25, 2010 | !K7 Records

The selections on Sascha Ring's contribution to the !K7 label’s DJ-Kicks series date back to the early ‘90s, but there’s technically no looking back on the part of the DJ/producer. They’ve all been “recently discovered.” The majority of this set does originate from 2006-2010, incorporating lean dubstep and streamlined techno with a couple outliers. 69’s “Rushed,” released by Carl Craig in 1993, is easily the most physical and intense of the lot. Strangely, it’s deployed as the second track in the sequence. Very shortly thereafter, the mix switches from charging to relatively sedate -- alternately melodic and abstract material suited more for home listening than clubbing. A handful of the highlights come off newer dubstep/post-dubstep 12" releases: Cosmin TRG's scuffling “Tower Block,” Ramadanman’s pinging/churning “Tempest,” and Joy Orbison's buoyant “The Shrew Would Have Cushioned the Blow” (the latter two of which were included on Scuba’s earlier Sub:Stance mix). Ring’s own “Sayulita,” an exclusive, is one of his most evocative, dynamic productions of late, full of space and percussive friction. ~ Andy Kellman
$1.49

Electronic/Dance - Released April 25, 2019 | Mute

$2.49

Electronic/Dance - Released September 13, 2011 | Mute

$3.99

Electronic/Dance - Released March 13, 2012 | Mute