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Chamber Music - Released July 18, 2014 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
In the stereo era, before digital, there were two great sets of recordings of Mozart's string quartets: the Quartetto Italiano's for Philips and the Amadeus Quartet's for Deutsche Grammophon. The Italian quartet's performances were rich and ripe, lush and lovely, sweet and sensual; the Austrian-English quartet's performances, reissued here in 2010, are sensitive but intense, controlled but soulful, intimate but objective. Where the Quartetto Italiano saw Mozart's music from one point of view, the Amadeus Quartet took a more nuanced view, showing more sides of the composer, and arguably more depth. Technically, the Amadeus' players are just as fine as the Italiano's but naturally quite different; their tone is more pungent, their balances less blended, and their rhythms more buoyant than their counterparts. The Amadeus set has two distinct advantages over the Italians, however: that set includes the three Divertimentos K. 136-138, and fits on six discs, while the Italiano's is on eight. Sonically, it's a toss-up; Philips gives the Italiano quartet its trademark opulent stereo sound, while DG gives the Amadeus players their trademark crystalline stereo sound. © TiVo
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Quartets - Released March 17, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Quartets - Released May 28, 2018 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released August 6, 2013 | Audite

Distinctions Diapason d'or
Between 1950 and 1967, the Amadeus Quartet recorded almost all of the string quartets of Ludwig van Beethoven at the Berlin RIAS studios, and Audite's first volume in a series of the group's recordings documents its intensive approach to this core repertoire. (No recording from the period exists of the String Quartet No. 10 in E flat major, "Harp," but the String Quintet in C major, "Storm," is provided here as a bonus.) This seven-CD trimline box set reveals not only the Amadeus Quartet's maturation as an ensemble and its deepening commitment to Beethoven's music, but also the ongoing development of recording technology, noticeable in the improvements of the analog sound of the original masters. Even though Audite's remastering produces clean and nuanced audio, these are still historic recordings that have a rather small, closed-in sound, so this set is mostly recommended for fans of the Amadeus Quartet and specialists in important chamber music recordings. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 22, 2013 | audite Musikproduktion

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 6, 2017 | Audite

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Classical - Released August 8, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

In the stereo era, before digital, there were two great sets of recordings of Mozart's string quartets: the Quartetto Italiano's for Philips and the Amadeus Quartet's for Deutsche Grammophon. The Italian quartet's performances were rich and ripe, lush and lovely, sweet and sensual; the Austrian-English quartet's performances, reissued here in 2010, are sensitive but intense, controlled but soulful, intimate but objective. Where the Quartetto Italiano saw Mozart's music from one point of view, the Amadeus Quartet took a more nuanced view, showing more sides of the composer, and arguably more depth. Technically, the Amadeus' players are just as fine as the Italiano's but naturally quite different; their tone is more pungent, their balances less blended, and their rhythms more buoyant than their counterparts. The Amadeus set has two distinct advantages over the Italians, however: that set includes the three Divertimentos K. 136-138, and fits on six discs, while the Italiano's is on eight. Sonically, it's a toss-up; Philips gives the Italiano quartet its trademark opulent stereo sound, while DG gives the Amadeus players their trademark crystalline stereo sound. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

While not the first complete recorded cycle of the Beethoven String Quartets, the Amadeus Quartet's late-'50s early-'60s set of the complete Beethoven quartets may be the first great recorded cycle. The Amadeus Quartet was a part-Austrian, part-English ensemble that fused elegance and intelligence and expressivity with virtuosity to create a style of quartet playing wholly suited to the Viennese classics from Mozart through Brahms but which fit Beethoven like a hand-tailored suit. While other ensembles had recorded the Beethoven quartets before the Amadeus, none of those performances had the clarity and lucidity the Amadeus brought to them. Forty years later, the Amadeus' Op. 18 Quartets are still among the best ever recorded: graceful and gracious, witty and intelligent, polished and expressive, the Amadeus' performances embody all that is best in the "early" quartets. The Amadeus' Op. 59 is nearly as great: its complete control of tempo and texture clarifies the thematic and harmonic structures of the quartets and only in the most strenuous passages and deepest movements does the Amadeus seem ever so slightly out of its depths. Similarly, its Op. 74 is one of the most beautiful and expressive ever recorded, but it cannot quite express the unfettered fury of the Quartet Op. 95. Only in the "late" quartets does the Amadeus sound not entirely up to the challenge of Beethoven's music. While it plays it all superbly, there are times when it seems unable to get beneath the surface of the music to the spiritual depths below and one is left with the impression of great things left unsaid. For all the clarity and lucidity of the Amadeus' performance, there is a sense that it cannot quite face the ultimate profundities of late Beethoven. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

The Amadeus Quartet, the greatest Central European string quartet of the middle years of the twentieth century, would never do anything so gauche as to record all 82 of Haydn's string quartets. After all, the first 19 were youthful works wherein Haydn figured out exactly how to compose a string quartet. What the Amadeus would do is record Haydn's mature string quartets, which still leaves 63 of the best string quartets ever composed. In these recordings of the 19 quartets from Op. 51 through 74 from the '70s, the Amadeus Quartet has once again turned in ideal recordings of supreme poise and ethereal grace. The Amadeus Quartet was always at its best in Beethoven, Mozart, and, especially, Haydn, the ensemble's combination of elegance, energy, intellect, and wit being a superb match for the music's. Each work -- the gay "Lark," the driven "Rider," the hard "Razor," the profound "Seven Last Words" -- gets the royal treatment from the Amadeus Quartet and deluxe treatment from Deutsche Grammophon's stereo sound at its cleanest and clearest. For listeners looking for 19 great performances of 19 great quartets, this set will be irresistible. © TiVo

Classical - Released October 10, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)