Similar artists

Albums

$14.99
$12.99

Rock - Released January 20, 2017 | Concord Records

Hi-Res Booklet
AFI's tenth set continues the California quartet's maturity and stylistic evolution. The self-titled album -- also known as "The Blood Album" -- draws from each period of their ever-changing past, offering fans of each stage something to enjoy. Of course, as with every AFI album released after 1999, polarizing commentary is likely to bubble up, lamenting how they just don't sound like they used to, which, as of 2017, is over two decades in the past. At this stage in their career, it should be apparent that the sound of those early records isn't coming back. They've been a different band since 2003's breakthrough Sing the Sorrow and haven't looked back since, morphing from youthful hardcore to dramatic goth to this, a punk-influenced take on new wave and post-punk. On AFI, the band delivers competent rock blasts -- like the "Silver and Cold" redux "Snow Cats" and emo-punk "Hidden Knives" -- that are as accessibly pleasing as "Miss Murder" and "Girl's Not Grey," while making sure to toss in a few throwbacks to retain the faithful and adding groovier rhythmic numbers that recall frontman Davey Havoc and guitarist/producer Jade Puget's work as the alterna-dance duo Blaqk Audio. Those latter tracks -- "Aurelia," "Above the Bridge," and "Feed from the Floor" -- are highlights on AFI, as atmospheric and vulnerably seductive as major influences the Cure, Joy Division, and Depeche Mode. Indeed, album closer "The Wind That Carries Me Away" is AFI's direct nod to the desert swagger of Depeche Mode's "I Feel You," buffered by soaring harmonies and sprawling open-sky grandeur. For the old-school fans still at the party, a handful of energetic standouts are the closest AFI come to anything resembling their "classic" punk sound. "Still a Stranger" is packed with Havoc's pleading, emotive vocals atop a jittery pogo, while the bitter "So Beneath You" seethes with a rebellious spirit buffered by a wall of muscle provided by Puget, bassist Hunter Burgan, and drummer Adam Carson. Meanwhile, "Dumb Kids" is as ferocious and breakneck as the band gets on AFI, and "White Offerings" is basically "The Leaving Song, Pt. 3." There's certainly enough here to prove that post-Nitro AFI are a better and stronger group, unafraid to continue pushing their sound with each release. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
$11.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Dreamworks POP

$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 1997 | Nitro Records (Concord)

"...Meaty..."
$12.99

Rock - Released June 6, 2006 | Interscope

AFI is a band lucky to own fiercely loyal fans who embrace -- and ultimately expect -- the gradual transformation the band has undergone with each album since 1999's Black Sails in the Sunset. Where many bands get called out for signing to a major label or even just maturing their sound over time, AFI fans have chiefly stayed devoted to their ever-evolving goth-punk heroes. With that in mind, Decemberunderground comes as AFI's follow-up to their ambitious major-label smash Sing the Sorrow. Due to the clever production tricks employed on that album, fans might expect even more intricate arrangements, sound effects, and sonic landscapes to emerge from the wintry packaging of Decemberunderground. To an extent this is true, but it's more that the cloudy gloom permeating their career thus far has lifted, allowing a relatively tighter and lighter overall album to emerge. Take the band's traditional prelude for instance: this time it's infused with stirring strings and an uplifting dance-pop beat that is a far cry from the dark and eerie call-to-arms chants of previous albums. And though "Kill Caustic" (and later "Affliction") brings AFI's earlier hardcore punch, if you thought "Girl's Not Grey" was poppy, check out this record's lead single, "Miss Murder." Despite a slightly ominous undertone, the glam-tinged song is damn near playful and sunny amid bouncy rhythms, vaguely industrial beats, background "hey!"s (courtesy of AFI's fan brotherhood, the Despair Faction), and a bassline that could have been swiped from Green Day. The band further dips its hand into new wave exploits ("37mm"), truly stirring choruses ("Summer Shudder"), stark electro vibrations ("Love Like Winter"), and the customary ballad ("Endlessly, She Said"). AFI even comes as close as they probably ever will to sounding like U2 in "The Missing Frame." Somehow, the guys have managed to combine hardcore instincts with dark emo-coated lyrics, synth shimmies, gothic aesthetics, and electronic beats into a sound that still remains wholly AFI. So maybe that's why fans have stuck by the band over all these years. Even as the guys stretch and flex their songwriting muscles, they never fail to remember where they came from, instead using their past work as the foundation to their essential growth. Decemberunderground may have more fully realized doses of pop and electronic music present, but the core of AFI's sound never strays too far from what listeners have grown to love about them in the first place. ~ Corey Apar
$12.99
AFI

Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 2004 | Nitro Records (Concord)

"While we're really proud of our history and accomplishments we feel our career is really just getting started and feel slightly embarrassed by anything that hints at retrospect. There's plenty of time for that later when we're old. We'd rather move forward...." That was the post by AFI on their official message board in October 2004. Though cryptic, it seemed to denounce or at least dismiss the hits and rarities compilation issued that November by Nitro Records, AFI's label until their 2003 bow for DreamWorks. Unauthorized? Maybe. But AFI is still a solid overview of the band's pre-Sing the Sorrow output, which between 1996 and 2000 included five albums and an EP. Quality was spotty on each release. But the records do trace the transformation of AFI's sound, from the early influence of California hardcore and punk to the crashing chords and richer melodic sense that would coalesce with the hit major-label debut, Sorrow. Working in reverse chronological order, AFI includes the stronger tracks from each album, as well as a few extras to reel in the diehards. "Winter's Tale" is a rousing, U.K.-only pop-punk gem from the Days of the Phoenix EP, there are two tracks from the All Hallows EP, and "Lower It" comes from the vinyl of 1999's Black Sails in the Sunset. "Rolling Balls" and "Who Said You Could Touch Me?" also come from the vinyl pressing of Very Proud of Ya. Even if it is a Christmas season play on AFI's larger popularity, Nitro's collection is a snapshot of the group's development. Its brash sound will also be a surprise to fans of the much more grandiose Sing the Sorrow. ~ Johnny Loftus
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Nitro Records (Concord)

A.F.I.'s second album features lots of warp-speed hardcore riffing topped with one-note melodies and lyrics dealing with various types of personal disillusionment (sample: "I can't be a part of your modern world"). The California quartet valiantly tries to keep hardcore alive, but doesn't put an individual stamp on the music to make it essential listening. ~ Andy Hinds
$7.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal Records

Booklet
AFI have definitely matured over the years. Their first jump was from a snotty, upstart California hardcore band with a heavy Misfits obsession to emo-goth superstars with their breakthrough 2003 epic Sing the Sorrow. That album and its 2006 follow-up, Decemberunderground, found lead singer Davey Havok and the rest of AFI fully embracing their dark, if still glitter-laden take on grandly produced and anthemic rock that somehow bridged the wide gap between the panicked, emo-soul of Fall Out Boy and the macabre, electronic-tinged sound of Marilyn Manson. 2009’s Crash Love, with its neon-colored nods to ‘80s Burundi beat pop and post-Smiths Morrissey, brought their sound full-circle, with songs that were the some of the most pop-oriented of the band’s career. 2013’s Burials finds AFI returning to a darker sound both lyrically and musically, without compromising on their trademark infectious hooks. As showcased on the malevolent, cinematic opening track, "The Sinking Night," Burials is certainly an album of epic gloom and angsty menace which often plays as if it was written as a soundtrack to a stylized thriller or a slick anime film about lost love and tortured obsession. On "The Sinking Night," Havok croons, "The blackness drips down from both my hands/ The gold in my palm was mistaken for sand/ Can you feel it?" We definitely can, and the rest of Burials only deepens the feeling. Of course, even though Havok never loosens his death grip here in terms of overall intensity, there are still moments of pop euphoria. To these ends, "17 Crimes" is a driving ode to teenage freedom, and "Greater Than 84," with its allusions to George Orwell's literary classic 1984, turns living in a dystopian city into a metaphor for a failed relationship. With his Bowie-esque knack for theatrically morphing his visage to fit each album, Havok (a career-long straight-edge vegan) is an often misunderstood, and underappreciated pop maverick. It's often too easy to focus on the eyeshadow or slant of his quaff, and miss the underlying intelligence and melodramatic wit that informs much of AFI's work. Similarly, guitarist Jade Puget, AFI's resident Mark Ronson and musical director, defies quick categorization with arrangements that draw upon the symphonic grandeur of Tony Visconti, as much as the titanic industrial wallop of Nine Inch Nails. With Burials, Havok and AFI don't just bury the castle of wrecked relationships, they put to rest any notions that they aren't kings of their dystopian rock kingdom. ~ Matt Collar
$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 2000 | Nitro Records (Concord)

Punk rawkers AFI exude another powerful disposition on their fifth album, The Art of Drowning. Issued on Dexter Holland's Nitro Records, AFI's quick and haughty, spiraling guitar riffs and crashing percussion make for another mishmash for single-fisted anthems for punk revivalists and enigmatic pop kids raging against the machine. Nothing short of Pennywise, D Generation, and Powerman 5000, AFI is rowdy with their old-school-inspired rants like "Ever and a Day" and "Of Greetings and Goodbyes." Frontman Davey Havok casts a rough demeanor, but certainly not anything intimidating because punk rock became friendly after the war of early-'90s grunge. The snarl and sweat are not as fashionable as it once was, but the attitude remains the same. ~ MacKenzie Wilson

Alternative & Indie - Released October 26, 2018 | Rise Records

Download not available
$4.99

Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 1999 | Nitro Records (Concord)

"...Excellent..."
$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 1999 | Nitro Records (Concord)

A.F.I. continue to grow musically on their fourth full-length album, Black Sails in the Sunset, which features a guest vocal from the Offspring's Dexter Holland. ~ Steve Huey
$6.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2018 | Rise Records

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2006 | Dreamworks POP

Download not available
$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 30, 2018 | Rise Records

$17.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Dreamworks POP

$7.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal Records

$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 1997 | Nitro Records (Concord)

The California foursome's first album is undistinguishable from countless similar hardcore bands. ~ Andy Hinds
$12.99

Rock - Released January 20, 2017 | Concord Records

News feed Prev. Next