Albums

$12.99

Latin Jazz - Released March 30, 1999 | Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
An improvement on tenor saxophonist Gato Barbieri's previous Columbia debut, this outing mostly features his romantic and passionate horn in the spotlight. One song is primarily a vocal feature for Gato. His backup band (which usually includes bassist Mark Egan and guitarist Chuck Loeb) is generally quite spirited, but it is the tenor who stars throughout. Even when sticking to the melody (Gato and Loeb wrote most of the material), there is so much feeling in Barbieri's playing that he largely possesses each song, even an oddly memorable rendition of "Auld Lang Syne." And, although the performances are a bit commercial in spots, Barbieri's sincere emotionalism consistently uplifts this recording. ~ Scott Yanow
$9.99

Latin Jazz - Released April 1, 1998 | Columbia

$12.99

Latin Jazz - Released September 3, 1996 | Columbia

David Sanchez shows off his versatility and talented improvising style throughout this diverse and well-conceived set. Ranging from bop (making Thelonious Monk's "Four In One" sound easy) to music in the same area that Joshua Redman is exploring to moments that almost sound like Steve Coleman's M-Base, Sanchez is in consistently creative form. The equally talented pianist Danilo Perez helps out on most cuts, a few selections have added percussion, and there are guest spots for altoist Kenny Garrett (who trades off with Sanchez on a fiery "The Elements") and singer Cassandra Wilson (who sticks to a haunting background on "Los Cronopios"), but the focus is mostly on the leader, who plays some lyrical soprano on two numbers. David Sanchez, who is improving and evolving year by year, has the potential to become a major force in jazz. ~ Scott Yanow

Genre

Latin Jazz in the magazine
  • From Father to Son
    From Father to Son Chucho Valdés and Arturo O’Farrill celebrate the art of Bebo Valdés and Chico O’Farrill…