Albums

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Jazz - Released January 25, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Even if his name has appeared on multiple ECM albums (John Abercrombie, Marc Johnson, Steve Kuhn, Paul Motian, etc.), Joe Lovano has until now never had the chance to be the leader of a record for Manfred Eicher’s label. At 66 years old, the saxophonist from Cleveland is finally the boss on Trio Tapestry which has been put together with pianist Marilyn Crispell and drummer Carmen Castaldi. It’s a formation without a double bass that offers the inner pow-er of an orchestra. Less voluble than usual, here Lovano throws himself into quite intimate narratives. “This trio”, he stated, “is a melodic, harmonic and rhythmic musical tapestry which creates moods and atmospheres.” This group is above all an ambassador for a colorful style of jazz. Spirituality and calmness underline each improvisation. We continue to wonder as to why Crispell isn’t a more well-know and praised musician. Following in the footsteps of Paul Bley and Cecil Taylor, she brings her piano into contemporary music territory laced with lyricism and proves that she is an essential member of this group which is equipped with a stunning creative force. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 25, 2019 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Album after album, Emile Parisien refines his self-portrait. He adds some shades. Erases others. And whatever the formation, context or repertoire, the saxophonist maintains his song, his voice and his own immediately identifiable style... Throughout his wide repertoire, the pieces that he has conceived with his quartet (for more than a decade) have always occupied a special place. With pianist Julien Touéry, double bassist Ivan Gélugne and, as a new recruit, drummer Julien Loutelier, Parisien leads this improvisation that touches on the sublime and is ever surprising. With his virtuosity he could have simply stuck to what is conventional. But that word doesn’t resonate with him. Every second of Double Screening explores new territories. He is one of the few saxophonists of his generation to alternate between lyricism and libertarianism in the snap of the finger. Going from laughter to tears is not a paradox in the universe of Emile Parisien's quartet. It is simply its raison d'être. And, in the end, a way to offer a type of jazz that is more organic than cerebral. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 25, 2019 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Their first collaboration, entitled Mare Nostrum in 2007, was really rather magical. So, it was hardly surprising that Paolo Fresu, Richard Galliano and Jan Lundgren returned with Mare Nostrum II in 2016, an album that was just as superb as the last. The Sardinian trumpeter, French accordionist and Swedish pianist once again displayed their natural sense of lyricism and poetry in their highly refined jazz through reinterpretations of pieces by the likes of Satie and Monteverdi… But good things always come in threes; after having recorded Volume I in Italy and Volume II in France, it seemed only logical that this album was recorded in Sweden to complete the trilogy. In the middle of Winter 2019, Fresu, Galliano and Lundgren met up once again to mix their personal compositions together for Volume III as well as integrating two covers of soundtracks – Norman Jewison’s The Windmills of Your Mind by Michel Legrand for The Thomas Crown Affair and Quincy Jones’s Love Theme from The Getaway from Sam Peckinpah’s The Getaway. Their partnership reaches new heights, the spaces feel even more comfortable and the musicality of their improvisations is multiplied tenfold. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released November 30, 2018 | Pirouet Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Vocal Jazz - Released November 30, 2018 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
In 2017, Gregory Porter released a tribute album - or rather a love letter, to the man he considers his ultimate hero: Nat King Cole. A remarkable musician who weaved his way between pure jazz and easy listening, an innovative and highly skilled pianist-virtuoso, and of course, a captivating singer/crooner with his deep, romantic and velvety voice that set him apart from everyone - this genius had never before been commemorated in so much style. In this live performance recorded on the prestigious stage of the Royal Albert Hall in London, Gregory Porter is supported by his trusty quartet (pianist Chip Crawford, bassist Jahmal Nichols, drummer Emanuel Harrold and saxophonist Tivon Pennicott) as well as by the 70 musicians of the London Studio Orchestra, conducted by Vince Mendoza. He features pieces that are closely associated with Nat King Cole (Mona Lisa, Nature Boy…) but also some of his own compositions ( Hey Laura, When Love Was King, Don’t Lose Your Steam…). Throughout One Night Only it is fascinating to see how Gregory Porter is just as comfortable when singing alongside the sophistication of the string section as he is in the rougher and groovier sequences. A vocal range that makes this show truly magical. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released November 16, 2018 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
"This version of SGT PEPPER'S treats the Beatles' originals like colorful clothes worn by today’s most electrifying jazz musicians, who give these old chestnuts a new body and vitality."
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Jazz - Released November 2, 2018 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released November 2, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released November 2, 2018 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
In 2016, Andrew Cyrille brought out an album with a powerfully unambiguous title: The Declaration Of Musical Independence. This was no surprise, coming from a free jazz militant who insists on authentic material direct from the source, and who has worked alongside some of the biggest names on the scene such as Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Marion Brown, Walt Dickerson, Charlie Haden, Carla Bley, Oliver Lake and Horace Tapscott… Two years on, the New York drummer has brought in Bill Frisell for Lebroba, this time as part of a trio, with trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith. The album's title is a contraction of the names of the three men's home towns: Leland, Brooklyn and Baltimore. Their idea is undoubtedly to democratically divide responsibility and Cyrille let’s his bandmates work in whichever way they see fit. Even the writing is shared out between these three avant-garde jazz masters. The meditative tone of the work here is set by the track Turiya, dedicated to Alice Coltrane. The whole album is a kind of celebration of space and time... Lebroba will leave you feeling like you’re floating across a sublime bluesy landscape. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released November 2, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
In 2016, Andrew Cyrille brought out an album with a powerfully unambiguous title: The Declaration Of Musical Independence. This was no surprise, coming from a free jazz militant who insists on authentic material direct from the source, and who has worked alongside some of the biggest names on the scene such as Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Marion Brown, Walt Dickerson, Charlie Haden, Carla Bley, Oliver Lake and Horace Tapscott… Two years on, the New York drummer has brought in Bill Frisell for Lebroba, this time as part of a trio, with trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith. The album's title is a contraction of the names of the three men's home towns: Leland, Brooklyn and Baltimore. Their idea is undoubtedly to democratically divide responsibility and Cyrille let’s his bandmates work in whichever way they see fit. Even the writing is shared out between these three avant-garde jazz masters. The meditative tone of the work here is set by the track Turiya, dedicated to Alice Coltrane. The whole album is a kind of celebration of space and time... Lebroba will leave you feeling like you’re floating across a sublime bluesy landscape. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 26, 2018 | Impulse!

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Label Impulse! has unearthed from its archives this previously unreleased concert from November 2007 between two absolute giants: Charlie Haden and Brad Mehldau. The bass player, who passed away in 2014, met the pianist for the first time in the early nineties. The spark was instantaneous, and the two virtuosos regularly worked together, both on stage and in studio. But never in duo. This 2007 live was the first time. At the invitation of Heidelberg Enjoy Jazz Festival, in Germany, Haden and Mehldau agreed to perform together in the magical setting of a church, the Christuskirche in Mannheim. And while the result was stunning, the tapes remained in storage for over a decade… "It’s thrilling to play with someone who improvises like this”, recalls the American pianist. “After all, this is the guy who did it first on his instrument. Those early records of the Ornette Coleman Quartet like This is Our Music or Change of the Century were not “free” in the sense that they abandoned the principles of harmony. They often were free of a fixed harmonic schema, though, and Charlie was improvising the harmony, from the ground up!" Above all else, it’s the depth of their complicity that shines through on this recording. The ease with which Charlie Haden and Brad Mehldau integrate space and silence in their exchanges is sublime. In terms of repertoire, they opted for classics  (Charlie Parker, Irving Berlin, Johnny Mercer, Gershwin, Kern…) that they stroke with their fingertips. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 26, 2018 | Impulse!

Hi-Res Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Label Impulse! has unearthed from its archives this previously unreleased concert from November 2007 between two absolute giants: Charlie Haden and Brad Mehldau. The bass player, who passed away in 2014, met the pianist for the first time in the early nineties. The spark was instantaneous, and the two virtuosos regularly worked together, both on stage and in studio. But never in duo. This 2007 live was the first time. At the invitation of Heidelberg Enjoy Jazz Festival, in Germany, Haden and Mehldau agreed to perform together in the magical setting of a church, the Christuskirche in Mannheim. And while the result was stunning, the tapes remained in storage for over a decade… "It’s thrilling to play with someone who improvises like this”, recalls the American pianist. “After all, this is the guy who did it first on his instrument. Those early records of the Ornette Coleman Quartet like This is Our Music or Change of the Century were not “free” in the sense that they abandoned the principles of harmony. They often were free of a fixed harmonic schema, though, and Charlie was improvising the harmony, from the ground up!" Above all else, it’s the depth of their complicity that shines through on this recording. The ease with which Charlie Haden and Brad Mehldau integrate space and silence in their exchanges is sublime. In terms of repertoire, they opted for classics  (Charlie Parker, Irving Berlin, Johnny Mercer, Gershwin, Kern…) that they stroke with their fingertips. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Contemporary Jazz - Released October 26, 2018 | Outnote Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released October 19, 2018 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Keith Jarrett’s solo discography is a bottomless pit that he’s been digging out since the end of the ‘60s, with about 25 albums and counting. It’s an ever-changing collection, much like the career of this pianist from Allentown. In 2002, after some serious health problems, Jarrett got back up on stage alone in Japan. Four years later, on 19th July 2006, he’s still alone, this time on the stage of the prestigious Teatro La Fenice, THE great Venetian Mecca for opera. Unlike his past concerts, which consisted of long improvisations of thirty or even forty minutes, he now focuses his performances around shorter pieces that are often linked to each other. Such is the case for this album recorded at La Fenice. Jarrett immediately throws himself body and soul into an ocean of notes, one of his 17-minute improvisations, amazing in its technique and to which only he holds the secret. The atonality collides with highly melodic sequences, jazz and classical music irrigating each of his ideas. Hold on tight or you’ll fall out your saddle! The level of musicality and the originality of his phrasing leaves you constantly fascinated by his unparalleled playing. It’s a language that speaks to everyone, both expert and beginner. And even when he goes off the beaten track to cover My Wild Irish Rose, Blossom and Stella By Starlight, his music is quite irresistible. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 19, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Keith Jarrett’s solo discography is a bottomless pit that he’s been digging out since the end of the ‘60s, with about 25 albums and counting. It’s an ever-changing collection, much like the career of this pianist from Allentown. In 2002, after some serious health problems, Jarrett got back up on stage alone in Japan. Four years later, on 19th July 2006, he’s still alone, this time on the stage of the prestigious Teatro La Fenice, THE great Venetian Mecca for opera. Unlike his past concerts, which consisted of long improvisations of thirty or even forty minutes, he now focuses his performances around shorter pieces that are often linked to each other. Such is the case for this album recorded at La Fenice. Jarrett immediately throws himself body and soul into an ocean of notes, one of his 17-minute improvisations, amazing in its technique and to which only he holds the secret. The atonality collides with highly melodic sequences, jazz and classical music irrigating each of his ideas. Hold on tight or you’ll fall out your saddle! The level of musicality and the originality of his phrasing leaves you constantly fascinated by his unparalleled playing. It’s a language that speaks to everyone, both expert and beginner. And even when he goes off the beaten track to cover My Wild Irish Rose, Blossom and Stella By Starlight, his music is quite irresistible. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 12, 2018 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
After two staggering studio albums (When the Heart Emerges Glistening in 2011 and The Imagined Savior Is Far Easier to Paint in 2014) and one brilliant live album (A Rift in Decorum in 2017), all three released on Blue Note, Ambrose Akinmusire has changed gear with a multifaceted and ambitious work that mixes jazz, string quartet, poetry and rap. The Californian trumpeter has never been a stranger to taking a step into the unknown, but Origami Harvest is without a doubt his most daring work to date. And the most mind-boggling! At his side, pianist Sam Harris, drummer Marcus Gilmore, saxophonist Walter Smith III and, rather more unexpected, the Mivos string quartet and Victor Vázquez (alias Kool A.D.), previously an MC with hip-hop outfit Das Racist. Jazz, free, classical, funk, rap, soul and spoken word all collide here. One might criticise Akinmusire for his 360° vision. This composition is bursting at the seams as it moves from free jazz to R&B before returning to contemporary music or funk. The radical nature of the project can be explained by its origins. Judd Greenstein from the New York Ecstatic Music Festival, who commissioned the work, asked the Californian for his craziest idea. “I wanted to do a project about extremes and putting things that are seemingly opposite right next to each other", Akinmusire explained . Despite everything, there is a real fluidity to Origami Harvest, the composition is a perfect mirror for the time in which we live - its contradictions, its violence, its frenetic changes of pace and style... "Origami,” said Akinmusire, “refers to the different ways black people, especially men, have to bend, whether in failure or to fit a mould. Then I had a son while writing this and I thought about these cycles repeating: Harvest." You'll need to take a little time to digest such a creative flood. In an era unused to pauses, contemplation and taking one's time, Origami Harvest is a curious case. It's a blast of fresh air which does you good even as it baffles you. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 5, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Without making any fuss, Jakob Bro keeps on being a rare and brilliant guitarist. Sound, space, melody, silence… the freshly-forty-year-old Danish musician isn’t a member of ECM for nothing. With Streams, his second album for Manfred Eicher’s Munich label released in 2016 with bass player Thomas Morgan and drummer Joey Baron, he continued to refine the values and playing style that suit him so well. Under the influence of his peer Bill Frisell, Bro knead some stretched textures and overlaid them with impeccable virtuosity. Two years later, the three men met again for this Bay Of Rainbows album recorded live at New York Jazz Standard in July 2017. A new zero gravity adventure which sees the fascinating relationship between Bro and Morgan continue (Bro calls Morgan his “musical soulmate”). The elder of the trio, Baron, isn’t here by chance, as Bro met Morgan when he was playing in Baron’s band… For this live album, their back-and-forths are whispered and the improvisations are almost like innuendos. This soft restraint never leads to monotony, quite the contrary, it’s what gives the album its radical grace. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 28, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - L'album du mois JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Following four albums that have helped established him on the contemporary jazz scene, Shai Maestro is taking a major step by combining with the ECM label. Still in a trio with his double bass accomplice Jorge Roeder and drummer Ofri Nehemya (who replaces regular Ziv Ravitz), the Israeli pianist is once again going down the path of sublime multi-layered narratives. The melodies are taken from jazz as well as Eastern traditional music, and even Western classical music. Whether he feels introspective (on Israeli Matti Caspi’s My Second Childhood) or overtly provocative (surprising interpretation of the classic These Foolish Things), he has kept his soft touch and refined musical language. Ever since 2012, when he released the first album with him as the frontman, his profoundly personal aesthetic has continued to impress. He possesses a strong narrative force and stays well wired into the times, like on the final composition What Else Needs To Happen?, in which Shai Maestro very subtly inserts the voice of Barack Obama giving a speech about gun control. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

Jazz - Released September 14, 2018 | Compost Records

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released September 7, 2018 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Masterpiece alert! After working together in drummer Billy Hart’s quartet (All Our Reasons in 2012 and One Is The Other in 2014), Mark Turner and Ethan Iverson are collaborating in a duo for the first time, in a way reminiscent of the legendary tandem Warne Marsh/Lennie Tristano. Except that here, The Bad Plus’ saxophonist and former pianist almost turn their collaboration into a moment of chamber jazz. Their back-and-forths throughout this Temporary Kings dive deep in intimacy. Turner, who is undoubtedly one of his generation’s best tenors, blows small, often unexpected phrases in a most unique fashion − far from the Coltranian cannons. Iverson, in a spirit reminiscent of Paul Bley, makes his fingers whisper, delivering thrifty notes and chords. Together, they sometimes moor on the shores of Third Stream, Gunther Schuller’s movement which synthetized European classical music and jazz at the end of the fifties. But most importantly, Mark Turner and Ethan Iverson remain very natural in their improvisations. Even when they may seem a tad brainy. Moreover, they never let go of the thread of their narrations, each more beautiful than the last. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

Genre

Jazz in the magazine
  • Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends
    Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends Ralph Alessi's Imaginary Friends is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • A Tropical Tale
    A Tropical Tale Leyla McCalla's The Capitalist Blues is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Blurred Boundaries
    Blurred Boundaries Anne Paceo's Bright Shadows is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • To the Power of Three
    To the Power of Three Joe Lovano's Trio Tapestry is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Dandy Man
    Dandy Man Bryan Ferry is the ultimate dandy, the singer that never gets old and who does as he pleases.
  • A Night of Nat
    A Night of Nat In 2017, Gregory Porter released a tribute album - or rather a love letter, to the man he considers his ultimate hero: Nat King Cole.
  • Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars
    Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars Jools Holland, the musical virtuoso, director and well-loved host of the BBC 2 programme Later… with Jools Holland since 1992, joins forces with the first-rate vocals of Marc Almond and the musicia...
  • 360° vision
    360° vision After two staggering studio albums (When the Heart Emerges Glistening in 2011 and The Imagined Savior Is Far Easier to Paint in 2014) and one brilliant live album (A Rift in Decorum in 2017), all t...
  • Leaning back to the 60s
    Leaning back to the 60s Jose James is bringing back the great soul music of the sixties.
  • Perfect unison
    Perfect unison Fifteen years on from Changing Places, his first album for the label ECM, Tord Gustavsen is once again offering up an album performed with a trio, which seems to be the line-up most in keeping with...