Albums

$8.99

French Music - Released June 13, 2011 | Naive

Booklet Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
$10.99

French Music - Released May 27, 2013 | Wagram Music - Cinq 7

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
$13.49

French Music - Released March 18, 2013 | Wagram Music - Cinq 7

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
$18.49

French Music - Released March 11, 2013 | Columbia

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
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French Music - Released February 18, 2013 | Wagram Music - 3ème Bureau

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Coup de coeur de l'Académie Charles Cros
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French Music - Released February 4, 2013 | Les Disques Célestes

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
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French Music - Released December 5, 2011 | TACET

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
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French Music - Released September 12, 2011 | PIAS France

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Sélection Les Inrocks
Seemingly rejuvenated by his brand new and much younger backing trio, Breton troubadour Miossec's eighth studio album, Chansons Ordinaires, owes very little to the traditional French song its title suggests. Its lyrics may be inspired by pre-war favorites Berthe Sylva and Maurice Chevallier, but after several albums of Gaellic folk and orchestral pop, the follow-up to 2009's Finisteriens is the most contemporary and alternative record of his 16-year career. "Du Bon Vieux Temps" intersperses its stoner rock riffs borrowed from Queens of the Stone Age's "No-One Knows" with carousel-style interludes before building up to an unsettling, jazz-rock crescendo; "Pour Les Amis" echoes the fervent indie rock of Arcade Fire with its pounding organ chords, driving beats, and garage rock hooks; while "Dramatique" begins with some lo-fi, grungy guitars and twinkling glockenspiels before bursting into life with a grandiose post-rock finale. It's a convincing transition, which makes you wonder why Miossec hasn't pursued such a direction before. His moody tones and cynical outlook on life are still very much in evidence, as shown on the psychedelic, mock-protest song "Protestataire" and the politically charged, avant-garde fuzz-pop of "Pour un Homme Couvert de Femmes." But his melancholic poetic delivery is so much more effective when accompanied by the album's prevalent, reverb-laden Wall of Sound, whether it's the guitar-shredding shoegaze of the My Bloody Valentine-esque "Pleine de Voix," the surging, angular alt rock of "D'un Fait Divers," or the dark "Qui Laisse Des Traces," whose somber, opening piano chords and faint pounding drums eventually give way to an atmospheric outro which sounds like it was recorded during the height of a particularly ferocious storm. The aimless art rock of "D'insomniaque" and the chugging, ghostly blues of "Sympathique" mean the album finishes with a bit of a whimper rather than the bang it deserves, but the consistently strong collection of songs ensures that Chansons Ordinaires is by far the most compelling album Miossec has ever recorded. ~ Jon O'Brien
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French Music - Released May 2, 2011 | SIX SARL

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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French Music - Released February 28, 2011 | Naive

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
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French Music - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Booklet Distinctions 3F de Télérama
Further establishing her maverick credentials, Parisian chanteuse Juliette's seventh studio album, No Parano, is a curious collection of songs which includes cover versions of Serge Gainsbourg's "Les Dessous Chics" and Salvatore Adamo's "Une Chose Pareille," and two collaborations with French cellist Vincent Segal, ("La Lueur Dans L'oeil," "Madrigal Moderne") alongside a reworking of 1991 album track, "Que Tal?" and a composition based on Victor Hugo's The Man Who Laughs ("La Chanson de Dea"). ~ Jon O'Brien
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French Music - Released March 22, 2010 | Parlophone France

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Sélection Les Inrocks
The English-speaking world may only remember Françoise Hardy as a '60s icon, but in France, she is rightly considered a major artist. The truth is that in the course of a 48-year career, Hardy has released 26 albums, almost invariably excellent. La Pluie Sans Parapluie is her first collection of original material in six years, a period the famously reclusive Hardy spent in putting together a duets album, and writing a very successful autobiography. Compared to 2004's elegiac Tant de Belles Choses, La Pluie Sans Parapluie is a much sunnier album, one that immediately brings to mind the lush yet intimate pop of her early-'70s work, such as Message Personnel and Et Si Je M'en Vais Avant Toi. "Sunnier," however, is an adjective that can only be used in comparison, as Hardy's entire oeuvre is the very definition of nocturnal, embodied in her dreamy hush of a voice against velvety arrangements. In this context, it only means that a few songs, such as the opener "Noir su Blanc" or "Champ d'Honneur," are driven by a typical rhythm track of drums and bass, rather than by piano or strings. Hardy writes the majority of the texts, while longtime collaborator Alain Lubrano and a cohort of France's most stylish tunesmiths such as Calogero, Murat, La Grande Sophie, Arthur H, or Pascale Daniel, as well as Germany's Fouxi and England's Ben Christophers, contribute fitting soundtracks to her catalog of longing, regret, and sensuous abandon. A particularly inspired second half includes gems such as "Le Temps de la Innocence" or "Mister," both worthy of a place among her late-'60s masterpieces Comment Te Dire Adieu or Ma Jeunesse Fout le Camp. As most Françoise Hardy releases go, La Pluie Sans Parapluie could easily double as a handbook in French elegance, it's got timeless class. ~ Mariano Prunes
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French Music - Released February 8, 2010 | Tesslandpierre&eau

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
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French Music - Released February 8, 2010 | Columbia

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
Following her contributions to The Backstage and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly soundtracks, a collaboration with Suede's Brett Anderson, and her LP recorded with Ultra Orange, Dingue is the debut solo album proper from French actress, model, and singer Emmanuelle Seigner. Featuring 11 songs written by Doriand and Keren Ann Zeidel, the 2009 release includes duets with Iggy Pop ("La Derniere Pluie") and husband Roman Polanski ("Qui Etes-Vous?"), alongside the single "Le Jour Parfait." ~ Jon O'Brien
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French Music - Released February 22, 2014 | JPB Production

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
$10.99

French Music - Released September 28, 2009 | Wagram Music

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Mano Solo's seventh and final studio album, Rentrer au Port (2009) was released mere months before the French singer/songwriter died of HIV/AIDS complications. It finds Solo back on a label, Wagram in this case, after self-releasing his last full-length effort, In the Garden (2007), in an unorthodox manner and to limited success. Rentrer au Port is a fine swan song effort. ~ Jason Birchmeier

Genre

French Music in the magazine