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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released June 3, 2014 | Carus

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Classical - Released April 1, 2020 | Brilliant Classics

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Chamber Music - Released May 20, 2010 | CPO

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For its second disc dedicated to the chamber music of Heinrich von Herzogenberg, the Minguet Quartett has chosen the German Romantic's String Quintet in C minor, Op. 77, and his String Quartet in D minor, Op. 18. As with a previous disc, featuring his Piano Quintet, Op. 17, and String Quartet, Op. 63, these are world-premiere recordings. As before, the German group's technique is self-assured and polished, its ensemble cogent, and its interpretations committed, and, as before, the music lets the group down. Herzogenberg, a skillful and sincere composer, was a good friend of Brahms, though not such a good friend that he refrained from marrying Elisabeth von Stockhausen, a woman Brahms was said to have loved, although, being Brahms, he never said a word about it. While Herzogenberg got the girl, Brahms clearly got the genius: Herzogenberg's music, though quite well-composed, sounds forceful yet fussy, tuneful but forgettable, heartfelt but curiously without effect. CPO's sound is cool, clear, and deep. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2001 | CPO

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Classical - Released February 22, 2010 | CPO

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Chamber Music - Released February 20, 2001 | CPO

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Chamber Music - Released October 17, 2000 | CPO

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Classical - Released February 1, 2007 | CPO

If the name Heinrich von Herzogenberg is not yet familiar, it soon will be, due to the growing revival of his music and the increasing number of recordings made since the 1990s, notably in Germany. But this late nineteenth century composer's reputation may only be minimally enhanced by all the attention that's being paid to his oeuvre; for the more exposure it receives, the more people will come to the conclusion that Herzogenberg's works are far too imitative of his contemporaries. Though obviously well-crafted and earnest, his music is too much a product of its time and environment, and the familiar styles of Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms dominate Herzogenberg's music so strongly that little of his own personality shines through. If the Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 50, and the Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 70, had been claimed as long-lost symphonies by either of those two Romantic masters, many listeners could have been fooled, so close are elements of Herzogenberg's symphonic rhetoric, melodic style, and orchestration to theirs. Yet because we know these works are Herzogenberg's, they may hold less interest because they are so plainly derivative, and their few signs of originality -- such as the unusual harmonies and modulations in his whimsical Scherzo movements -- might pass by without much notice. Still, there is a better than fair chance that these two neglected works will eventually find a place in the repertoire, thanks to the engaging performances by Frank Beermann and the NDR Radiophilharmonie. A better case for these symphonies can't be imagined, especially because the interpretations are coherent and the playing is buoyant and vital, even when the music isn't all that interesting. CPO's reproduction is first-rate, with a full-bodied ensemble sound and natural resonance. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2009 | CPO

Nineteenth century Austrian composer Heinrich von Herzogenberg started his career as a lesser Wagner and ended it a lesser Brahms. This CPO disc contains two works from the latter part of his career, his four-movement Piano Quintet in C major and his three-movement String Quartet in F minor, performed by the Minguet Quartett with pianist Oliver Triendl. Both works are superbly composed and deeply felt. Herzogenberg clearly knew exactly how to construct a sonata-form movement, precisely how to write counterpoint, and unerringly how to keep his music moving. The quintet's central Adagio manifestly touches on topics close to the composer's heart and the quartet's opening Allegro moderato has palpable drive. Neither work, though, has appreciable depth or originality. Even with the Minguet's and Triendl's wholly professional performances, Herzogenberg's music resolutely fails to make any particular impression or leave any discernible memories. Some listeners who enjoy the idiom of Brahms' and Dvorák's chamber music may find these works worth hearing, but this disc is unlikely to attract a broad audience. CPO's digital sound is, as usual, clear, clean, cool, and immediate. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Toccata Classics

Booklet
A small and enthusiastic following exists for the late nineteenth century composer Heinrich von Herzogenberg, but it's hard to call the handful of recordings of his music made since the 1990s sufficient for a full-fledged revival. It seems, too, that the greatest interest in Herzogenberg's works is found in Germany, and few artists of international repute have taken up this neglected composer's cause. Anthony Goldstone's and Caroline Clemmow's 2005 release on Toccata Classics provides a rare sample of Herzogenberg's output for piano duet and solo piano, and four of the works receive their world premieres here. Yet for all the hype surrounding this album, it seems lightweight and less of a revelation than its promoters claim. Much has been made of Herzogenberg's affinity for the music of Schumann and Brahms, and there are more than superficial resemblances to the former in the Theme and Variations, Op. 13, and obvious mimicry of the latter in the Variations on a Theme of Brahms, Op. 23. However, such ready comparisons to one's contemporaries are usually regarded as a sign of weakness, since an independent identity is what we seek in great composers, and anything less usually indicates mediocrity. Herzogenberg is better than that, certainly in terms of his craft and invention; but his reliance on the styles and techniques of two famous masters puts him at a disadvantage. We hear these works as clever copies, or as curiosities, but always with an ear to whom Herzogenberg is emulating, without getting much of a sense of his own originality. One hopes that such a quirky suite as Allotria, Op. 33, Book I might reveal glimpses of an odd personality, or that the Waltzes, Op. 53, might be light and frothy enough to resemble no one in particular. Yet even here, and despite occasional passages of ingenuity, Herzogenberg's imitations are apparent and frustratingly slavish. Unless one feels that Schumann and Brahms did not write enough music of their own and that a clone is needed, this disc will be a bit of a letdown. Goldstone and Clemmow deliver entertaining performances that are also heartfelt, and Toccata has served up a fine production with pleasantly resonant sound, so the Herzogenberg coterie can at least revel in a fine recording that does him justice. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | CPO

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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released July 1, 2014 | CPO

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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released February 28, 2012 | CPO

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Cantatas (secular) - Released December 7, 2018 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released August 1, 2014 | SWR Mediaservices GmbH

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Classical - Released October 5, 2000 | Antes Edition

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Chamber Music - Released January 3, 2012 | CPO

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2008 | CPO

Heinrich von Herzogenberg isn't exactly a household name, but due to the rapidly growing catalog of recordings of his music, he can be counted among the handful of second-tier composers of the late nineteenth century who have undergone significant revivals. Granted, much of Herzogenberg's resurgence seems centered in Germany, where recordings on the CPO label seem to be at the vanguard, but the attention paid to his music is worldwide and not likely to fade quickly. This 2008 release of the Piano Trio No. 1 in C minor, Op. 24, and the Piano Trio No. 2 in D minor, Op. 36, will no doubt please admirers of Herzogenberg's earnest and well-crafted music, though newcomers to this composer may feel a sense of déjà vu because the music has more than a superficial resemblance to the chamber works of Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms. Despite his own prodigious abilities and enormous output, through which he should have discovered his own voice, Herzogenberg was unable to escape the influence of his contemporaries, and their harmonic language and sound world became his as well. Bearing this in mind, the works on this disc are still quite involving and pleasing for their abundant drama and lyricism, and if listeners find that the similarities to Schumann and Brahms are positive features, not weaknesses, then this disc is sure to please. The playing by the ATOS Trio -- made up of violinist Annette von Hehn, cellist Stefan Heinemeyer, and pianist Thomas Hoppe -- is warm and ingratiating, and the exceptional production of Deutschlandradio brings the music across with great clarity, richness, and depth. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 6, 2000 | CPO

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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released June 5, 2012 | Carus

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