Albums

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Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Pianist Igor Levit moved from Russia to Germany when he was eight, but there's still a lot of Russian in his outlook: an attraction to the pure virtuoso tradition, and a tendency toward big statements and the big questions. Nowhere has this been more true than on Life, an album that succeeds both thematically and as a thrilling embodiment of late-Romantic pianism at its best. The title, and the contents, refer to the album's memorial function: Levit chose the program to honor a close artist friend who died in an accident. The music is monumental enough to live up to its death-haunted theme, rising out of silence in the Fantasia after J.S. Bach of Busoni and continuing with a remarkably sustained mood of soberness and dignity, punctuated by frenetic outbursts. Busoni is one major presence on the program; the other is Liszt, and the two come together in the Busoni transcription of the Fantasy and Fugue on the Chorale Ad nos, ad salutarem undam of Liszt, originally for organ and an impressive virtuoso task on the piano. So the program works well also as a revival of pure late-Romantic pianism: you can easily imagine that Liszt would have loved this, and loved to play it. A third theme interweaving the works on the program is that of reinterpretation, as in the Brahms transcription of the Chaconne from the Bach Partita for solo violin in D minor, BWV 1004; the fact that Levit has played these works in different orderings in recital testifies to the program's remarkable cohesiveness. There is music by Frederic Rzewski in a memorial vein, and Bill Evans' serene Peace Piece is a lovely conclusion. Bravo!
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Duets - Released January 26, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
The Hantaï brothers – Marc on traverso and Pierre on the harpsichord – give us here everything Bach “really” composed for flute and harpsichord, as some possible falsely attributed works are not featured here. Compared to the violin – which counts six sonatas and partitas for solo violin and six sonatas for violin and obbligato harpsichord – the transverse flute may look like the forgotten sibling in the Kantor’s works. But at the time the transverse flute was still a very recent instrument, that had just come (back) from France (where it was called the “German flute”) and Bach only started using it in his cantatas around 1721-1722, and therefore only had a very limited dedicated repertoire. These four sonatas are anything but a collection. Two are missing to reach the sacred number of six. Furthermore, they were composed over a period of twenty years. And while one may be tempted to confer them the balance and symmetry desired by the arranger – two sonatas with obbligato harpsichord (BWV1034 and 1035), two with basso continuo (1030 and 1032), two in minor, two in major, two in three movements, two in four, two in E, and two fifths ascending or descending from this central E, etc. –, all of it might be merely fortuitous; they are rather a “blended” family. However these works for flute have in common the fact of being clouded by great uncertainty – whether it is about their chronology, the date of composition, the intended recipient, their form, their main instrumentation, their creation… So all is left for the listener is to experience them, performed here on a flute made by Joannes Hyacinth Rottenburgh (first half of the 18th century) from Brussels, and a harpsichord after Mietke (Berlin) made in 1702. © SM/Qobuz

Classical - Released December 8, 2017 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Released October 20, 2017 | Editions Jade

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama

Jazz - Released April 28, 2017 | Mélisse

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released February 24, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released November 10, 2016 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released September 30, 2016 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Here, on the very same album, are recordings made far apart in time by Martha Argerich and Itzhak Perlman: Schumann’s Sonata Op. 105. Live at a concert in Saratoga on 30th July 1998 represents the first meeting between the two giants of the music scene, whereas the rest of the programme was recorded as recently as March 2016. There is romanticism above all with Schumann and Brahms - of course, the only Scherzo movement is in the “F-A-E” Sonata, a work composed jointly between Schumann, Dietrich and Brahms, but movements are commonly played individually. Argerich and Perlman end with Bach’s Baroque romanticism with one of the sonatas for violin and keyboard, where Bach himself wrote out the keyboard part instead of leaving it as a continuo. Written thusly, the score is a duet among equals, and even more so when the equals in question are these two in particular. © SM/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released September 23, 2016 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
The French pianist Lucas Debargue was a Tchaikovsky Competition sensation in 2015 (although he did not win), and this studio debut gives you a good idea of what the fuss was about. Debargue offers the French tradition in all its calmly urbane glory. You might like various aspects of this release: the unapologetically pianistic but flawlessly elegant Bach Toccata, the Medtner Sonata in F minor, Op. 5. You might sample one of the movements of the latter, inasmuch as the preponderance of recordings of Medtner's solo piano music tends to favor the thunder and lightning of Marc-André Hamelin, for example. Debargue does not reach such dramatic heights, but there's room for more restrained readings of Medtner. The highlight is the utterly distinctive reading of the Beethoven Piano Sonata in D major, Op. 10, No. 3. This work, with its four-movement plan and expansive themes, is generally taken as an example of how Beethoven was stretching his wings toward his epic style, but Debargue effectively takes it on its own terms, with a playful opening movement and an almost static slow movement that may not be to everyone's taste, but certainly makes something new of this much-played sonata. There's a good deal of intelligence and care shown in the small details throughout, and the recording marks Debargue as a young French artist to watch carefully.
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Classical - Released April 15, 2016 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - Exceptional sound
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released October 6, 2014 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released January 24, 2014 | Sony Classical

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Jazz - Released August 26, 2013 | Naive

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Classical - Released September 11, 2012 | Alpha

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Intrada

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Cantatas (sacred) - Released July 31, 2007 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique - 4F de Télérama