Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

$25.49
$21.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$14.99
$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$20.99
$17.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$20.99
$17.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1963 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Exceptional sound
$20.99
$17.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$14.99
$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$8.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Dwight Twilley's first album, Sincerely, opens with "I'm on Fire," a pop tune so unstoppable that it became a Top 20 single even though Twilley and his partner Phil Seymour didn't have an album to go with it when it hit radio in the spring of 1975. It would be close to a year before Sincerely finally emerged, after sessions at London's Trident Studio were scrapped in favor of material recorded in Twilley's hometown of Tulsa, OK. Commercially, the decision was nearly fatal to Twilley's career momentum, but it's hard to argue with what he and Seymour came up with; with the two handling nearly all the vocals and instruments themselves, they crafted a power pop masterpiece, one that merged their Anglophile leanings with the Southern roots of rock & roll better than any of their contemporaries (including Big Star, who never seemed as comfortable with Memphis soul as they were with Liverpool pop). While nothing on the album quite matches the genius of "I'm on Fire" (what does?), the rest of the album is a consistently impressive, nodding towards a number of rock & roll touchstones while sounding confidently original at all times; the Raspberries-on-downs glide of "Baby, Let's Cruise," the loping updated rockabilly of "T.V.," the funky groove of "Feeling in the Dark," the Searchers-esque jangle of "Three Persons," and the broken-hearted melancholy of "I'm Losing You" could each be the work of a different band, but the strength of Twilley's songwriting and Seymour's versatile vocal chops bring a welcome unity to these many shades of pop perfection. While Twilley and Seymour would both enjoy long careers with a certain degree of success, neither ever made an album quite as good as Sincerely -- though they came close. ~ Mark Deming
$11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$10.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Prior to Nick of Time, Bonnie Raitt had been a reliable cult artist, delivering a string of solid records that were moderate successes and usually musically satisfying. From her 1971 debut through 1982's Green Light, she had a solid streak, but 1986's Nine Lives snapped it, falling far short of her usual potential. Therefore, it shouldn't have been a surprise when Raitt decided to craft its follow-up as a major comeback, collaborating with producer Don Was on Nick of Time. At the time, the pairing seemed a little odd, since he was primarily known for the weird hipster funk of Was (Not Was), but the match turned out to be inspired. Was used Raitt's classic early-'70s records as a blueprint, choosing to update the sound with a smooth, professional production and a batch of excellent contemporary songs. In this context, Raitt flourishes; she never rocks too hard, but there is grit to her singing and playing, even when the surfaces are clean and inviting. And while she only has two original songs here, Nick of Time plays like autobiography, which is a testament to the power of the songs, performances, and productions. It was a great comeback album that made for a great story, but the record never would have been a blockbuster success if it wasn't for the music, which is among the finest Raitt ever made. She must have realized this, since Nick of Time served as the blueprint for the majority of her '90s albums. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2001 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Energetic, no-holds-barred, smoking rock with R&B roots. ~ David Szatmary
$16.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The best Beach Boys album, and one of the best of the 1960s. The group here reached a whole new level in terms of both composition and production, layering tracks upon tracks of vocals and instruments to create a richly symphonic sound. Conventional keyboards and guitars were combined with exotic touches of orchestrated strings, bicycle bells, buzzing organs, harpsichords, flutes, Theremin, Hawaiian-sounding string instruments, Coca-Cola cans, barking dogs, and more. It wouldn't have been a classic without great songs, and this has some of the group's most stunning melodies, as well as lyrical themes which evoke both the intensity of newly born love affairs and the disappointment of failed romance (add in some general statements about loss of innocence and modern-day confusion as well). The spiritual quality of the material is enhanced by some of the most gorgeous upper-register male vocals (especially by Brian and Carl Wilson) ever heard on a rock record. "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "Caroline No," and "Sloop John B" (the last of which wasn't originally intended to go on the album) are the well-known hits, but equally worthy are such cuts as "You Still Believe in Me," "Don't Talk," "I Know There's an Answer," and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times." It's often said that this is more of a Brian Wilson album than a Beach Boys recording (session musicians played most of the parts), but it should be noted that the harmonies are pure Beach Boys (and some of their best). Massively influential upon its release (although it was a relatively low seller compared to their previous LPs), it immediately vaulted the band into the top level of rock innovators among the intelligentsia, especially in Britain, where it was a much bigger hit. ~ Richie Unterberger
$17.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2001 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
If a dream – or a nightmare – could be translated into notes and harmonies, this third album from Sparklehorse would be one of the most beautiful symphonies... But It's A Wonderful Life isn't just a lovely collection of silky-soft, opium-laced airs, or troubling out-takes from Alice In Wonderland, on the edge of folk. Mark Linkous gives us his most beautiful lyrics, little seeds of depression and poetry which we can imagine being planted in the instrumental furrows of Flying by the Beatles... Naturally, the drums are muffled. Naturally, we hear, here and there, misty clouds of strings. Naturally, we are swimming along in the soundtrack to a film that's never been made. Naturally everything on this sublime album is as natural as it is surprising. And at every turn, this dreamlike sensation... Because in the world of dreams, anything is possible. And if Linkous is Alice, her guests all have a role as well: Tom Waits as the Cheshire Cat, PJ Harvey as the White Rabbit, Nina Persson of the Cardigans as the Queen of Hearts and Adrian Utley of Portishead as the March Hare. But more than she's Alice, Linkous herself; much more gifted than her friends in the Flaming Lips, Mercury Rev or Grandaddy when it comes to assimilating the works of her forebears, who are Neil Young, the Beatles, R.E.M., Velvet, Chris Bell and Skip Spence… Her palette is big and broad. Just like all the sensations on It's A Wonderful Life. Remember: it's just a dream. Behind the false monotony of her voice, Sparklehorse's brain is weaving, song by song, the semantics of an impressionist folk rock and chloroformed country. This richness is never cheap. It's the solid baggage of a songwriter and melodist who writes the way others paint. And her little strokes add up to a wonderful picture… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Frank Sinatra's second set of torch songs recorded with Gordon Jenkins, No One Cares was nearly as good as its predecessor Where Are You? Expanding the melancholy tone of the duo's previous collaboration, No One Cares consists of nothing but brooding, lonely songs. Jenkins gives the songs a subtly tragic treatment, and Sinatra responds with a wrenching performance. It lacks the grandiose melancholy of Only the Lonely, nor is it as lush as Where Are You?, but in its slow, bluesy tempos and heartbreaking little flourishes, it is every bit as moving. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Stereophile: Record To Die For
Once Nat King Cole gave up playing piano on a regular basis and instead focused on a series of easy listening vocal albums, jazz fans longed for him to return to his first love. These 1956 studio sessions made up Cole's last jazz-oriented disc, where he played piano and sang on every number, joined by several guest soloists. Cole's vocals are impeccable and swinging, while his piano alternates between providing subdued backgrounds and light solos that don't reveal his true potential on the instrument. Willie Smith's smooth alto sax buoys the singer in the brisk take of "Just You, Just Me." Harry "Sweets" Edison's muted trumpet complements the leader in his interpretation of "Sweet Lorraine." Composer Juan Tizol's valve trombone and former Cole sideman Jack Costanzo's bongos add just the right touch to the brisk take of "Caravan." Stuff Smith's humorous, unusually understated violin is a nice touch in "When I Grow Too Old to Dream." It's hard for any Nat King Cole fan to ignore these important sessions. [The original version of this release featured a dozen tracks, later expanded to 17 in the '80s with the discovery of some unreleased material. Yet another track, the alternate take of "You're Looking at Me," was also found and added to reissues beginning in the late '90s.] ~ Ken Dryden
$7.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Close to You is one of Frank Sinatra's most gentle and intimate albums, and that is due in no small part to the Hollywood String Quartet, which forms the core of the album's instrumental support. It also was one of the most difficult to record, taking eight months and five different sessions. Certainly, it is one of the most unusual and special of Sinatra's albums, featuring a subdued and detailed performances that accentuate both the romantic longing and understated humor of the numbers, which are mainly torch songs. With the quartet's support, the album comes closer to sounding like a classical album, like a pop variation on chamber music. Where the intimacy of In the Wee Small Hours sounded confessional and heart-broken, Close to You has a delicate, lovely quality; it may not be seductive, but it is charming and romantic. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$10.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The year after he had formally disbanded his trio to turn his attention to vocal pop music, Nat King Cole reversed himself and went into the studio with guitarist John Collins, bassist Charlie Harris, and drummer Bunny Shawker and recorded the eight-song 10" LP Penthouse Serenade, a quiet, reflective set of standards like "Somebody Loves Me" and "Laura" that he performed instrumentally at the piano. The album confirmed that, whatever success he might be having as a singer, he hadn't lost his touch. ~ William Ruhlmann
$8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography