Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

$16.49

Rock - Released August 5, 1966 | EMI Catalogue

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Everyone has their favorite Beatles record, but Revolver will always be a truly pivotal point, one of the most influential (THE most?) albums in the history of rock. This seventh studio recording, which was released in August 1966, waves goodbye to the friendly and playful image of the Fab Four from Liverpool in order for them to become the architects of a total pop revolution. With Revolver, backed by the indispensable production of George Martin, the group embarks on some of the wildest experiments in the service of creating their most fascinating material ever. They tinker with their sound and explore new territory once again, they thrive on prohibited substances (also evoked in their lyrics), introduce an impressive range of instruments (harpsichord, trumpet, sitar, organ...) and strengthen their writing, once so carefree in the infancy of their careers. Notably, the Fab Four then decided not to perform on stage again, preferring to use the recording studio as an instrument in itself, if not sometimes as an additional member. For the rest, the simple song titles written in procession is apt conclusion: Tomorrow Never Knows, Eleanor Rigby, I'm Only Sleeping, Got To Get You Into My Life, Taxman... ©MZ/Qobuz, Translation/BM
$16.49

Rock - Released December 3, 1965 | EMI Catalogue

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With its more ambitious compositions, Help! had made it clear that the Beatles did not intend to stay remain that nice little group from Liverpool much longer. Four months later, Rubber Soul was released in December of 1965, and the Fab Four show that they have indeed grown up artistically. There are more mature texts (written by Bob Dylan, a real influence on the Beatles as confessed by McCartney himself) and more daring harmonies. They even bring their instrumentation to unknown territory as demonstrated by Norwegian Wood or the bass on Think for Yourself. As for ballads like Girl or Michelle, they are beautiful and will remain timeless. Above all, this sixth studio album mixes more musical styles - be it pop (of course) but also R&B, folk, soul and psychedelic. Rubber Soul also marks the point where we see each member of the group affirm their unique personalities, and with the support of producer George Martin, John, Paul, George and Ringo were encouraged to move away from their "youthful" habits. ©MZ/Qobuz, Translation/BM
$16.49

Rock - Released June 1, 1967 | EMI Catalogue

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How to better a record like Revolver? Sign off another by the name of Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. For many, this is truly the greatest pop and rock music of all time, if not one of the most significant works of art in popular culture from the second half of the twentieth century... After discovering the endless possibilities offered to them in the recording studio, John, Paul, George and Ringo continue their crazy musical experiments. More than ever considered as the ‘fifth Beatle’, producer George Martin runs out a magic carpet of discoveries that would go on to influence the future of pop. When this eighth studio album is released in June 1967, the era is one that has embraced the all-out psychedelic, and this concept album is a true hallucinatory trip (not only for Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds). Like the patchwork of his mythical pocket, Sergeant Pepper's journeys through pure pop, manly rock'n'roll, totally trippy sequences (to near worldly scales), retro songs of nursery rhymes, animal noises and even classical music! On the composition side, the duo of Lennon/McCartney is at the top of its game, delivering new songs that are still influential today. ©MZ/Qobuz, Translation/BM
$16.49

Rock - Released July 10, 1964 | EMI Catalogue

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Soundtrack of the eponymous film directed by Richard Lester (dubbed in French Quatre garçons dans le vent or Four boys in the wind), A Hard Day's Night is a first for The Beatles, as for this third album released at the beginning of summer 1964, John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote every song on the disc without any covers! And what songs! Can’t Buy Me Love, A Hard Day's Night, I Should Have Known Better - the level is very high and each hit track shows a rapidly developing musical and artistic identity as the group went from being national treasures to international icons. Every corner of this changing pop façade is fascinating. The irresistible melodies are pulled together by sparkling guitars in an innocent, feel-good tribute to all things melodic. A Hard Day's Night is the epitome of the early periods of that famous 'sound' of the The Beatles. Even in ballads such as And I Love Her, the Fab Four already demonstrate a fascinating musical maturity... A true joy for the listener. ©MZ/Qobuz, Translation/BM
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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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$14.99

Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$10.49
RAM

Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released January 14, 2011 | Legacy Recordings

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$10.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Paul McCartney Catalog

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$31.99

Rock - Released November 17, 2009 | ABKCO (US)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$12.99

Pop - Released April 8, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
1976. The punk explosion is shaking the world of rock'n'roll, from New York to London, via Mont-de-Marsan. Wiping the slate clean and making a fresh start is the order of the day. In short, it is not a good time to proclaim your love for the Beatles or the Stones. But these bands were still heroes to the Flamin' Groovies', an incredible group born under the Californian sun in 1965 and neatly tucked in between the two stools of these two illustrious British groups. After Teenage Head, their third album published in 1971, the Flamin' Groovies saw some tricky times. Their label, Buddah, let them go and singer Roy Loney took off, leaving guitarist Cyril Jordan at the tiller. All the same, England loves the Groovies, who stick to holy scriptures and don't go in for the flowers and patchouli so beloved of the hippies who were swarming all over the world at the time. With a new label (Sire records) and a new singer (Chris Wilson), Shake Some Action, which came out in summer 1976, brought a new sound! It's a revolution to the ears. Blues, rockabilly and rock give way to a powerful pop, fed on the legacy of the greatest hours of the British Invasion. A restlessness which will shake the nascent punk scene and prepare the ground for the wave of power pop that would follow it. A new style came caged in the eponymous track that opens the record, the single Shake Some Action which easily counts amongst the greatest pop songs in the history of the genre. © MZ/Qobuz
$15.49

Pop - Released July 12, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Channeling the lessons of the experimental Porcupine into more conventional and simple structural parameters, Ocean Rain emerges as Echo & the Bunnymen's most beautiful and memorable effort. Ornamenting Ian McCulloch's most consistently strong collection of songs to date with subdued guitar textures, sweeping string arrangements, and hauntingly evocative production, the album is dramatic and majestic; "The Killing Moon," Ocean Rain's emotional centerpiece, remains the group's unrivalled pinnacle. ~ Jason Ankeny
$7.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1988 | Universal Records

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Richie Havens' finest recording, Mixed Bag captures the essence of his music and presents it in an attractive package that has held up well. A close listen to lyrics like "I Can't Make It Anymore" and "Morning, Morning" reveals sadness and loneliness, yet the music is so appealingly positive that a listener actually comes away feeling uplifted. In fact, on most of the songs on this album, it's the sound of Havens' distinctive voice coupled with his unusual open-E guitar tuning, rather than the specific lyrical content of the songs, that pulls the listener in. The six-and-a-half minute "Follow" is structured like a Dylan composition in the "Hard Rain" mode, with its memorable verse-ending refrain, "Don't mind me 'cause I ain't nothin' but a dream." Both "Sandy" and "San Francisco Bay Blues" have a jazzy feel, while the aforementioned "I Can't Make It Anymore" would not have been out of place in a movie soundtrack or pop radio playlist of the time. "Handsome Johnny," one of Havens' best known songs as a result of the Woodstock film, is a classic anti-war ballad, stoked by the singer's unmistakable thumb-chorded guitar strumming. Mixed Bag winds up with a soulful cover of Dylan's "Just Like a Woman" and an electric piano-propelled take on the Lennon-McCartney classic, "Eleanor Rigby." ~ Jim Newsom
$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1991 | Geffen

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The "difficult second album" is one of the perennial rock & roll clichés, but few second albums ever were as difficult as Use Your Illusion. Not really conceived as a double album but impossible to separate as individual works, Use Your Illusion is a shining example of a suddenly successful band getting it all wrong and letting its ambitions run wild. Taking nearly three years to complete, the recording of the album was clearly difficult, and tensions between Slash, Izzy Stradlin, and Axl Rose are evident from the start. The two guitarists, particularly Stradlin, are trying to keep the group closer to its hard rock roots, but Rose has pretensions of being Queen and Elton John, which is particularly odd for a notoriously homophobic Midwestern boy. Conceivably, the two aspirations could have been divided between the two records, but instead they are just thrown into the blender -- it's just a coincidence that Use Your Illusion I is a harder-rocking record than II. Stradlin has a stronger presence on I, contributing three of the best songs -- "Dust n' Bones," "You Ain't the First," and "Double Talkin' Jive" -- which help keep the album in Stonesy Aerosmith territory. On the whole, the album is stronger than II, even though there's a fair amount of filler, including a dippy psychedelic collaboration with Alice Cooper and a song that takes its title from the Osmonds' biggest hit. But it also has two ambitious set pieces, "November Rain" and "Coma," which find Rose fulfilling his ambitions, as well as the ferocious, metallic "Perfect Crime" and the original version of the power ballad "Don't Cry." Still, it can be a chore to find the highlights on the record amid the overblown production and endless amounts of filler. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1966 | Geffen*

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Stereophile: Record To Die For
$56.99
$50.99

Rock - Released May 26, 1967 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
How to better a record like Revolver? Sign off another by the name of Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. For many, this is truly the greatest pop and rock music of all time, if not one of the most significant works of art in popular culture from the second half of the twentieth century... After discovering the endless possibilities offered to them in the recording studio, John, Paul, George and Ringo continue their crazy musical experiments. More than ever considered as the ‘fifth Beatle’, producer George Martin runs out a magic carpet of discoveries that would go on to influence the future of pop. When this eighth studio album is released in June 1967, the era is one that has embraced the all-out psychedelic, and this concept album is a true hallucinatory trip (not only for Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds). Like the patchwork of his mythical pocket, Sergeant Pepper's journeys through pure pop, manly rock'n'roll, totally trippy sequences (to near worldly scales), retro songs of nursery rhymes, animal noises and even classical music! On the composition side, the duo of Lennon/McCartney is at the top of its game, delivering new songs that are still influential today. © MZ/Qobuz, Translation/BM