Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Eagulls - Ullages

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Ullages

Eagulls

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Eagulls' self-titled debut earned acclaim for the way the band blurred its punk edges with shoegaze-sized walls of sound. This fondness for atmosphere was the only hint of the radical makeover they undertake on Ullages, an anagram of the band's name that doubles as an alter ego: if Eagulls was indebted to the gritty side of post-punk, then this is the glossy, but just as gloomy, flip side. Though Eagulls were specifically inspired by the Cocteau Twins while making the album, Ullages' sonic cathedrals -- which were recorded in a converted Catholic church, natch -- evoke a host of dourly beautiful bands. "Blume"'s psychedelic leanings recall the Horrors and Echo & the Bunnymen before them, while the album's ringing riffs and George Mitchell's impassioned delivery often suggest early Simple Minds. However, Ullages' most obvious reference point is Pornography-era Cure. Stripped of Eagulls' fury, Mitchell's yelp sounds more like Robert Smith than ever, especially when it's surrounded by crystalline synths and glassy guitars on songs like "Heads or Tails." At times, Ullages teeters between homage and caricature: "My Life in Rewind" is one of the most captivating examples of how Eagulls turned their debut's explosive power inward, yet its swooning riffs and lyrics like "painting with tears in my eyes" give a directness to the Cure's poetic angst that, for better and worse, feels adolescent. There's no denying Ullages is well crafted; the woozy interlude "Harpstrings" and glistening tracks like "Velvet" and "White Lie Lullabies" make the most of the album's darkly glamorous palette, but there are fewer peaks and valleys within its songs than on Eagulls. Whether this means the album is more consistent or more monotonous than what came before may depend on the listener's fondness for somber post-punk moods, but Ullages often feels most convincing when the band injects a little of its old energy into its new approach. "Lemontrees" adds some bite to the album's sparkle, while "Euphoria"'s melodrama is matched by its powerful drums and "Skipping" harnesses some of Eagulls' anger. Even if it isn't as dynamic as its predecessor, at the very least Ullages reflects that Eagulls can do more than rant.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

More info

Ullages

Eagulls

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Heads or Tails
00:04:49

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

2
Euphoria
00:04:51

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

3
My Life in Rewind
00:05:33

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

4
Harpstrings
00:01:25

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

5
Velvet
00:03:44

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

6
Psalms
00:03:33

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

7
Blume
00:04:19

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

8
Skipping
00:04:30

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

9
Lemontrees
00:04:32

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

10
Aisles
00:03:57

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

11
White Lie Lullabies
00:04:21

Eagulls, MainArtist

© 2016 Partisan Records ℗ 2016 Partisan Records

Album Description

Eagulls' self-titled debut earned acclaim for the way the band blurred its punk edges with shoegaze-sized walls of sound. This fondness for atmosphere was the only hint of the radical makeover they undertake on Ullages, an anagram of the band's name that doubles as an alter ego: if Eagulls was indebted to the gritty side of post-punk, then this is the glossy, but just as gloomy, flip side. Though Eagulls were specifically inspired by the Cocteau Twins while making the album, Ullages' sonic cathedrals -- which were recorded in a converted Catholic church, natch -- evoke a host of dourly beautiful bands. "Blume"'s psychedelic leanings recall the Horrors and Echo & the Bunnymen before them, while the album's ringing riffs and George Mitchell's impassioned delivery often suggest early Simple Minds. However, Ullages' most obvious reference point is Pornography-era Cure. Stripped of Eagulls' fury, Mitchell's yelp sounds more like Robert Smith than ever, especially when it's surrounded by crystalline synths and glassy guitars on songs like "Heads or Tails." At times, Ullages teeters between homage and caricature: "My Life in Rewind" is one of the most captivating examples of how Eagulls turned their debut's explosive power inward, yet its swooning riffs and lyrics like "painting with tears in my eyes" give a directness to the Cure's poetic angst that, for better and worse, feels adolescent. There's no denying Ullages is well crafted; the woozy interlude "Harpstrings" and glistening tracks like "Velvet" and "White Lie Lullabies" make the most of the album's darkly glamorous palette, but there are fewer peaks and valleys within its songs than on Eagulls. Whether this means the album is more consistent or more monotonous than what came before may depend on the listener's fondness for somber post-punk moods, but Ullages often feels most convincing when the band injects a little of its old energy into its new approach. "Lemontrees" adds some bite to the album's sparkle, while "Euphoria"'s melodrama is matched by its powerful drums and "Skipping" harnesses some of Eagulls' anger. Even if it isn't as dynamic as its predecessor, at the very least Ullages reflects that Eagulls can do more than rant.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Debussy – Rameau

Víkingur Ólafsson

Debussy – Rameau Víkingur Ólafsson

The Köln Concert (Live at the Opera, Köln, 1975)

Keith Jarrett

Idle Moments

Grant Green

Idle Moments Grant Green

Philip Glass: Piano Works

Víkingur Ólafsson

Philip Glass: Piano Works Víkingur Ólafsson
More on Qobuz
By Eagulls

Ullages

Eagulls

Ullages Eagulls

EP

Eagulls

EP Eagulls

Eagulls

Eagulls

Eagulls Eagulls

Eagulls

Eagulls

Eagulls Eagulls
You may also like...

Palais d'argile

Feu! Chatterton

Palais d'argile Feu! Chatterton

Folklore (Explicit)

Taylor Swift

Folklore (Explicit) Taylor Swift

Fetch The Bolt Cutters

Fiona Apple

What Kinda Music

Tom Misch

What Kinda Music Tom Misch

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

Billie Eilish

In your panoramas...
The Women of Nashville

It's not easy to elbow your way through the macho Music City scene, the birthplace of country music, when you're a woman. Over the years, some of them have nevertheless managed to shift lines and attitudes, like these ten pioneers and revolutionaries who have put – even stamped – their boots on Nashville's table.

Nordic Jazz in 10 Albums

Snowy scenes, big expanses, beautiful nature everywhere… Scandinavia is often described by the same old clichés. Jazz is no exception. We tend to talk about Scandi jazz like it’s one big genre. However, each country has its own distinct style; Denmark’s scene rivals traditional North American jazz, Norway tends to get experimental and Sweden treads the line between the two. Nordic musicians have been adding their own unique touch to the genre since the 70s and the younger generation continue to sculpt its future. Here, we zoom in on Scandinavian jazz in 10 albums, offering a glimpse into a discography that’s as wide as a fjord.

Iggy and the Stooges: The Dawn of Punk

In 1969, a group of self-confessed cretins dynamited rock'n'roll with a charge of distortion and nihilistic lyrics. At the head of these Stooges was Iggy Pop, a sort of obsessive, rebellious Nijinsky, who was destined to become the Godfather of punk rock.

In the news...