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Francesco Tristano Schlimé - Not for Piano

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Not for Piano

Francesco Tristano

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Don't let the title of Francesco Tristano's CD deceive you, for he plays acoustic piano on all the selections, enhanced by occasional ghostly electronic background trimmings. It is not necessarily a jazz piano recording, but one where he has paid attention to the minimalist 20th and 21st century players influenced by Steve Reich. Tristano's music is also keyed into techno (modifying a tune by Autechre) and alternative rock, some ethnic elements, and pure improvisational keyboard stylings. The introductory piece, "Hello," establishes the repeat-line concept with attributions, different accents and dynamics, bouncy and soulful components, and some improvisation. "Strings of Life," an adaptation of Detroit techno pioneer Derrick May's "Strings," exploits underground phantom effects in a two-chord development that builds momentum. A rumbling free improv discourse during "Ap" features a string of mini-arpeggios, while "The Melody" shows Tristano in joyous counterintuitive play. Three selections team Tristano with the brilliant Lebanese pianist Rami Khalife (his CD Scene from Hellek is a must-buy), and they display instant rapport. Tapping the pianos inside and out during "Jeita" to start, they move into a fractured theme and then a train trip with consistent forward motion. "The Bells" is closest to Steve Reich's concept -- slow, steady, then speeding within a controlled melodic framework -- while "Hymn" takes a dramatic and boisterous turn with a sense of purpose that speeds past the Reich visage. Tristano is in many ways a sensible and somewhat predictable player, but takes sufficient risks and uses shadings of gray and blue, a bit of Latin samba as on "Two Minds One Sound," and lighthearted romanticism or delicate simplicity offering diversity beyond strict minimalism. A most enjoyable and interesting project, it should please most progressive music listeners, and serve as a credible prelude to future works.
© Michael G. Nastos /TiVo

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Not for Piano

Francesco Tristano Schlimé

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1
Hello
00:04:42

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

2
Barcelona Trist
00:04:25

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

3
Strings of Life
00:07:15

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Derrick May, compositeur - Michaël James, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

4
Andover
00:06:12

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Autechre, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

5
AP*
00:02:40

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

6
The Melody
00:04:34

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur - Rami Khalife, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

7
Jeita
00:07:04

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur - Rami Khalife, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

8
The Bells
00:05:54

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Jeff Mills, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

9
Hymn
00:02:52

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur - Rami Khalife, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

10
Two Minds One Sound
00:05:05

Francesco Tristano, interprète - Francesco Schlimé, compositeur - Raimundo Penaforte, compositeur

2007 InFiné 2007 InFiné

Album Description

Don't let the title of Francesco Tristano's CD deceive you, for he plays acoustic piano on all the selections, enhanced by occasional ghostly electronic background trimmings. It is not necessarily a jazz piano recording, but one where he has paid attention to the minimalist 20th and 21st century players influenced by Steve Reich. Tristano's music is also keyed into techno (modifying a tune by Autechre) and alternative rock, some ethnic elements, and pure improvisational keyboard stylings. The introductory piece, "Hello," establishes the repeat-line concept with attributions, different accents and dynamics, bouncy and soulful components, and some improvisation. "Strings of Life," an adaptation of Detroit techno pioneer Derrick May's "Strings," exploits underground phantom effects in a two-chord development that builds momentum. A rumbling free improv discourse during "Ap" features a string of mini-arpeggios, while "The Melody" shows Tristano in joyous counterintuitive play. Three selections team Tristano with the brilliant Lebanese pianist Rami Khalife (his CD Scene from Hellek is a must-buy), and they display instant rapport. Tapping the pianos inside and out during "Jeita" to start, they move into a fractured theme and then a train trip with consistent forward motion. "The Bells" is closest to Steve Reich's concept -- slow, steady, then speeding within a controlled melodic framework -- while "Hymn" takes a dramatic and boisterous turn with a sense of purpose that speeds past the Reich visage. Tristano is in many ways a sensible and somewhat predictable player, but takes sufficient risks and uses shadings of gray and blue, a bit of Latin samba as on "Two Minds One Sound," and lighthearted romanticism or delicate simplicity offering diversity beyond strict minimalism. A most enjoyable and interesting project, it should please most progressive music listeners, and serve as a credible prelude to future works.
© Michael G. Nastos /TiVo

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