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Vladimir Jurowski - Mahler: Symphony No. 4

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Mahler: Symphony No. 4

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir Jurowski and Sofia Fomina

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Ah yes, glissandos galore! How we have missed them. While it sometimes seems as though every contemporary conductor, both young and old, feels obliged to bring their own ideas to Mahler’s work, Vladimir Jurowski, already a highly-distinguished conductor who has often explored the works of the “Czech” composer (Symphony No. 1, Symphony No. 2, Totenfeier), is not afraid of relying on expressive phrases that seem somewhat questionable today. It is strange, because such joy, performed with such style, is hard to resist... And what a Ruhevoll he delivers on this album!
Jurowski continues his Mahlerian journey here with Symphony No. 4. He offers a completely original touch, mingling influences from Dvořák and Janáček with those of Bruckner and Strauss. Is this what Mahler would have wanted? In any case, he is modern precisely for that reason, and Jurowski knows it. It all seems like a game to him. Don’t bother looking for the ethereal (found in Abbado’s interpretation) or eternity (Haitink). Instead, the flutes gargle, the clarinets growl, the bassoons blush, the timpani roar, and above all this bohemian commotion, the violins sing with their “pricking” technique. The fluctuating poetics of Bedächtig have rarely sounded so alive, natural or radiant. The scordatura of the second movement conjures up an image of hell, acting as an appetiser for the Burleske from the Ninth. Finally, the horn continues resounding and, even in the middle of hell, lyricism triumphs. In the final lied (Sehr behaglich), Sofia Fomina, with her perfect voice, performs a light dance with a childish spirit that transcends the lyrics “No music on earth is comparable to ours” (Kein’ Musik ist ja nicht auf Erden die unsrer verglichen kann werden). It begs the question: were Seefried and Walter the inspiration for this enchanting interpretation by Jurowski? And when will Symphony No. 6 be released?! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz

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Mahler: Symphony No. 4

Vladimir Jurowski

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1
Symphony No. 4 in G Major for Soprano, Solo Violin and Orchestra: I. Bedächtig, nicht eilen
00:17:56

Gustav Mahler, Composer - Copyright Control, MusicPublisher - London Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Vladimir Jurowski, Conductor, MainArtist - Sofia Fomina, Soloist, MainArtist

2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd 2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd

2
Symphony No. 4 in G Major for Soprano, Solo Violin and Orchestra: II. In gemächlicher Bewegung, ohne Hast
00:10:13

Gustav Mahler, Composer - Copyright Control, MusicPublisher - London Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Vladimir Jurowski, Conductor, MainArtist - Sofia Fomina, Soloist, MainArtist

2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd 2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd

3
Symphony No. 4 in G Major for Soprano, Solo Violin and Orchestra: III. Ruhevoll (Poco adagio)
00:21:19

Gustav Mahler, Composer - Copyright Control, MusicPublisher - London Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Vladimir Jurowski, Conductor, MainArtist - Sofia Fomina, Soloist, MainArtist

2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd 2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd

4
Symphony No. 4 in G Major for Soprano, Solo Violin and Orchestra: IV. Sehr behaglich
00:09:34

Gustav Mahler, Composer - Copyright Control, MusicPublisher - London Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Vladimir Jurowski, Conductor, MainArtist - Sofia Fomina, Soloist, MainArtist

2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd 2019 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd

Album Description

Ah yes, glissandos galore! How we have missed them. While it sometimes seems as though every contemporary conductor, both young and old, feels obliged to bring their own ideas to Mahler’s work, Vladimir Jurowski, already a highly-distinguished conductor who has often explored the works of the “Czech” composer (Symphony No. 1, Symphony No. 2, Totenfeier), is not afraid of relying on expressive phrases that seem somewhat questionable today. It is strange, because such joy, performed with such style, is hard to resist... And what a Ruhevoll he delivers on this album!
Jurowski continues his Mahlerian journey here with Symphony No. 4. He offers a completely original touch, mingling influences from Dvořák and Janáček with those of Bruckner and Strauss. Is this what Mahler would have wanted? In any case, he is modern precisely for that reason, and Jurowski knows it. It all seems like a game to him. Don’t bother looking for the ethereal (found in Abbado’s interpretation) or eternity (Haitink). Instead, the flutes gargle, the clarinets growl, the bassoons blush, the timpani roar, and above all this bohemian commotion, the violins sing with their “pricking” technique. The fluctuating poetics of Bedächtig have rarely sounded so alive, natural or radiant. The scordatura of the second movement conjures up an image of hell, acting as an appetiser for the Burleske from the Ninth. Finally, the horn continues resounding and, even in the middle of hell, lyricism triumphs. In the final lied (Sehr behaglich), Sofia Fomina, with her perfect voice, performs a light dance with a childish spirit that transcends the lyrics “No music on earth is comparable to ours” (Kein’ Musik ist ja nicht auf Erden die unsrer verglichen kann werden). It begs the question: were Seefried and Walter the inspiration for this enchanting interpretation by Jurowski? And when will Symphony No. 6 be released?! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz

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