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Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

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Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (Nagisa Oshima's Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Ryuichi Sakamoto

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1983 | Editions Milan Music

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Neo Geo innovator and international musical collaborator Ryuichi Sakamoto has run the gamut in his lengthy career, from the Kraftwerk-inspired work of the Yellow Magic Orchestra and a handful of high-profile soundtracks, to several solo albums and various guest spots with Arto Lindsay, David Sylvian, Thomas Dolby, and Public Image Ltd., among many others. And on the heels of the YMO's breakup in 1983, Sakamoto jumped right into the fray with this soundtrack to director Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (Sakamoto also co-starred along with David Bowie). While not as sophisticated as the music he wrote for The Sheltering Sky and The Last Emperor (a collaboration with David Byrne), Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence does sport one of Sakamoto's most fetching pieces, "ForbiddenColours" (given many treatments, including a fine David Sylvian vocal version), and a few successful Asian and Western classical hybrids. Unfortunately, though, the music often bogs down in bloated, synth-washed musings and staid rhythmic underpinnings. Not the best introduction to Sakamoto's work, but certainly worth a cut-out bin price for the lovely variations on "Forbidden Colours." © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Les Sept mercenaires (Bande Originale du Film de John Sturges)

Elmer Bernstein

Film Soundtracks - Released March 30, 2004 | Editions Milan Music

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Furyo - Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (Nagisa Oshima's Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Ryuichi Sakamoto

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1983 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Neo Geo innovator and international musical collaborator Ryuichi Sakamoto has run the gamut in his lengthy career, from the Kraftwerk-inspired work of the Yellow Magic Orchestra and a handful of high-profile soundtracks, to several solo albums and various guest spots with Arto Lindsay, David Sylvian, Thomas Dolby, and Public Image Ltd., among many others. And on the heels of the YMO's breakup in 1983, Sakamoto jumped right into the fray with this soundtrack to director Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (Sakamoto also co-starred along with David Bowie). While not as sophisticated as the music he wrote for The Sheltering Sky and The Last Emperor (a collaboration with David Byrne), Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence does sport one of Sakamoto's most fetching pieces, "ForbiddenColours" (given many treatments, including a fine David Sylvian vocal version), and a few successful Asian and Western classical hybrids. Unfortunately, though, the music often bogs down in bloated, synth-washed musings and staid rhythmic underpinnings. Not the best introduction to Sakamoto's work, but certainly worth a cut-out bin price for the lovely variations on "Forbidden Colours." © Stephen Cook /TiVo

40 films - 40 Bandes Originales (Volume 1)

Vladimir Cosma

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2015 | Larghetto

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Bande Originale du film "Et Dieu créa la femme" de Roger Vadim (Version remasterisée 1998)

Paul Misraki

Film Soundtracks - Released November 6, 2007 | Larghetto

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The Pink Panther: Music from the Film Score Composed and Conducted by Henry Mancini

Henry Mancini

Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA Victor - Legacy

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The Party

Henry Mancini

Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA - Legacy

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Last Tango In Paris (Le Dernier tango à Paris) - Digitally Remastered

Gato Barbieri

Film Soundtracks - Released December 4, 2014 | EMI Music Publishing Italia Srl

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Bande Originale du Film "La Horde sauvage" ("The Wild Bunch", Sam Peckinpah - 1969)

Jerry Fielding

Film Soundtracks - Released June 13, 1997 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Bullitt (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Lalo Schifrin

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1968 | Rhino - Warner Records

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The Towering Inferno (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack - 1974)

John Williams

Film Soundtracks - Released October 27, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Records

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The Grand Budapest Hotel (Original Soundtrack)

Various Artists

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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One of the most traditional soundtracks for a Wes Anderson film, Grand Budapest Hotel's music sidesteps pop songs in favor of pieces that highlight the story's setting. Befitting a caper set at a Central European hotel in the '30s, Alexandre Desplat's score and performances by ensembles including the Osipov State Russian Folk Orchestra create a lavish, Old World feel. Budapest's orchestral pieces, which include "Concerto for Lute and Plucked Strings I. Moderato" and "The Linden Tree" are particularly charming, setting a genteel mood echoed by the traditional arrangement of "Moonshine." Meanwhile, Desplat's score feels akin to his twinkly, mischievous music for Fantastic Mr. Fox, which was a caper of another sort. Indeed, this might be one of the twinkliest scores to an Anderson film, which is saying something. However, Desplat gives these sparkles nuance and depth, creating an entire vocabulary from them that spans the dreamy "Mr. Moustafa," "Night Train to Nebelsbad"'s jazzy insistence, the lively wit of "The Society of the Crossed Keys," and the oddly comforting "The War (Zero's Theme)." Most excitingly, the high-stakes nature of a heist film like this one allows Desplat to inject more drama and suspense into Anderson's ultra-stylish world, and at times his pieces echo iconic scores such as Dr. Zhivago and The Third Man. The winding melody that is one of the score's major motifs takes on a sinister cast on "The Family Desgoffe und Taxis" and "J.G. Jopling, Private Inquiry Agent," while "The Lutz Police Militia" and "Last Will and Testament" add some menace -- however stylized -- to the proceedings. As always, the collaboration between Anderson, Desplat, and music supervisor Randall Poster sets the mood perfectly, whether that mood is innocence, mischief, mystery, or beauty. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Airport

Alfred Newman

Film Soundtracks - Released July 6, 1993 | Geffen

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Fables de La Fontaine

Vladimir Cosma

Musical Theatre - Released January 1, 2014 | Larghetto

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Les Enfants du paradis, Marcel Carné, Jacques Prévert et la musique

Joseph Kosma

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1945 | Editions Milan Music

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La Dolce Vita - Les Nuits de Cabiria (Federico Fellini's Original Motion Picture Soundtracks - Bandes originales des films de Fellini)

Nino Rota

Film Soundtracks - Released September 15, 2011 | Editions Milan Music

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Bande Originale du Film "Jules et Jim" (François Truffaut - 1961)

Georges Delerue

Film Soundtracks - Released July 15, 2013 | Editions Milan Music

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Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?

Alex North

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1966 | Rhino - Warner Records

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While Mike Nichols' 1966 film of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? gets more frightening every time you watch it, Alexander North's score to the same film gets more consoling every time you hear it. Nichols' film, particularly the performances by Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, has scenes of terrific intensity, but North's score, though faithful to what's on screen, has a tenderness, even a sweetness, that transforms the ultimate meaning of the film. Part of it is North's characteristically evocative orchestration with some cues delicately scored for guitar, celesta, bass clarinet, harpsichord, and a pair of harps, while others are scored for spare almost spooky winds arrayed against soothing strings. But most of it is North's soaring melodies and brooding harmonies -- and especially his big-hearted main theme. By prefiguring the film's reconciliatory ending, the solace offered by North's score transfigures all the horrors enacted between Taylor and Burton. Though clearly the anonymous studio orchestra wasn't given much time to learn its parts -- the ensemble sometimes flags, the strings' intonation occasionally turns sour -- the individual players' performances are persuasive. The stereo sound is impressive for its clarity and immediacy, but unfortunately the remastering here is so minimal that the sound seems to be coming directly off of an old LP. The inclusion of snippets of Taylor and Burton's dialogue from the film at the start of some tracks is at first disconcerting, but will help orient the listener who hasn't seen the film in a long time. © TiVo
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Vivement Truffaut !

Various Artists

Film Soundtracks - Released May 6, 2013 | Editions Milan Music

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Jurassic Park - 20th Anniversary

John Williams

Film Soundtracks - Released May 1, 1993 | Geffen*

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John Williams' score for what has become the most successful movie of all time is similar to his scores for other popular Steven Spielberg films. He remains firmly in the tradition of the lush, heavily orchestrated score. This is the first horror movie he and Spielberg collaborated on since Jaws, but there is nothing like the threatening theme that helped define that monster movie here. Instead, there is a lot of quiet music, a much more subtle touch, and a wistful theme that runs throughout, although things do come to a boil now and then. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo