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Crawling To The U.S.A.

Elvis Costello

Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 15 oktober 2021 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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Spanish Model

Elvis Costello

Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 10 september 2021 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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Mentira (Lip Service)

Elvis Costello

Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 6 augustus 2021 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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Unfaithful Music & Soundtrack Album

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 9 oktober 2015 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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In Motion Pictures

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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The Return Of The Spectacular Spinning Songbook

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 2 april 2012 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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A weighty box set containing one concert in three different formats -- CD, DVD, and 10" vinyl -- The Return of the Spectacular Spinning Songbook!!! gained some notoriety in the week prior to its release when Elvis Costello claimed its “price appears to be either a misprint or a satire.” True, the $262 price tag is steep -- particularly for an album that offers 16 songs on its CD and 19 on its DVD, some overlapped, some not -- but some die-hard fans with deep wallets will surely find the replica of the Spectacular Spinning Songwheel appealing and the musical contents, which are penciled in for a separate affordable release sometime in 2012, are strong. Costello & the Imposters are in high spirits, jumping out of the gate with “I Hope You’re Happy Now” -- a tune whose 1986 vintage dates from the original Spinning Songwheel tour, legendary among Costello fanatics for its loose, unpredictable nature -- then tearing into Nick Lowe’s “Heart of the City,” one of two unexpected covers here (the other being the Rolling Stones’ “Out of Time”). Other pleasant surprises rear their heads -- notably Susanna Hoffs taking lead on “Tear Off Your Own Head (It’s a Doll Revolution),” a song the Bangles recorded after Elvis -- but he still finds time for such staples as “Everyday I Write the Book,” “Watching the Detectives,” “I Want You,” “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding,” and “Radio, Radio,” so it’s not entirely a stroll through the darkest corners of Costello’s past, something that undoubtedly makes that high price tag sting just a little bit more. But disregard the cost of The Return of the Spectacular Spinning Songbook!!! for a moment and focus on the music: it’s an enjoyable set that is absolutely worth the price when it’s available at a lower suggested retail, and for those wealthy Costello fanatics, this big box is a handsome collectable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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The Return Of The Spectacular Spinning Songbook

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 2 april 2012 | UMe - Elvis Costello

A weighty box set containing one concert in three different formats -- CD, DVD, and 10" vinyl -- The Return of the Spectacular Spinning Songbook!!! gained some notoriety in the week prior to its release when Elvis Costello claimed its “price appears to be either a misprint or a satire.” True, the $262 price tag is steep -- particularly for an album that offers 16 songs on its CD and 19 on its DVD, some overlapped, some not -- but some die-hard fans with deep wallets will surely find the replica of the Spectacular Spinning Songwheel appealing and the musical contents, which are penciled in for a separate affordable release sometime in 2012, are strong. Costello & the Imposters are in high spirits, jumping out of the gate with “I Hope You’re Happy Now” -- a tune whose 1986 vintage dates from the original Spinning Songwheel tour, legendary among Costello fanatics for its loose, unpredictable nature -- then tearing into Nick Lowe’s “Heart of the City,” one of two unexpected covers here (the other being the Rolling Stones’ “Out of Time”). Other pleasant surprises rear their heads -- notably Susanna Hoffs taking lead on “Tear Off Your Own Head (It’s a Doll Revolution),” a song the Bangles recorded after Elvis -- but he still finds time for such staples as “Everyday I Write the Book,” “Watching the Detectives,” “I Want You,” “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding,” and “Radio, Radio,” so it’s not entirely a stroll through the darkest corners of Costello’s past, something that undoubtedly makes that high price tag sting just a little bit more. But disregard the cost of The Return of the Spectacular Spinning Songbook!!! for a moment and focus on the music: it’s an enjoyable set that is absolutely worth the price when it’s available at a lower suggested retail, and for those wealthy Costello fanatics, this big box is a handsome collectable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Live At Hollywood High

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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Live At The El Mocambo

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 6 maart 1978 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Live at the El Mocambo was recorded on March 6, 1978, during a club show in Toronto, Canada, as Elvis Costello and the Attractions were storming North America in support of My Aim Is True; the set was broadcast live by a local FM radio outlet, and this album is a clean but compressed, slightly flat recording drawn from the station's feed. Released as a promotional album by the Canadian branch of Columbia Records, the album soon became a eagerly sought-after collector's item, and before long it became perhaps the most widespread Costello bootleg on the gray market before Rykodisc gave the album a belated commercial release as a bonus disc in 1993's 2 1/2 Years box set. (The Ryko version, however, does clip out some of the between-song patter, including Costello's announcement that he's come to Toronto on behalf of Great Britain to ask for Canada back!) Replete with adequate but hardly spectacular audio and occasional flubs from the band, Live at the El Mocambo is a warts-and-all portrait of this band in their earlier days, but the seething energy of the performances is unmistakable, the stripped-down interpretations of the My Aim Is True material rock harder than their studio incarnations, and the version of "Less Than Zero" features the "American" lyrics Costello penned to make the song more relevant to stateside listeners. And it does sound a good bit better than any of the bootlegs available of Costello onstage during his formative period; if you want to hear what Elvis Costello sounded like on stage when he was still pop music's angriest man, this is the best place to go. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Out Of Our Idiot

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 4 december 1987 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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Taking Liberties

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1980 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Elvis Costello's early productivity was a bit more than most American rock fans were used to in the one-album-every-18-months 1970s; not only had Costello released four studio albums between 1977 and 1980, there were a number of compilation tracks, EPs, and non-LP B-sides that had found release in Europe but not the United States, while the U.K. editions of This Year's Model and Armed Forces both featured tunes that were stripped from American releases. Soon, import distributors had built a cottage industry out of helping loyal Costello fans complete their collections, and in 1980, Columbia Records, Costello's U.S. label at the time, finally made an effort at closing the gap between his American and European catalogs with Taking Liberties. Compiling 20 songs that had never appeared on a Costello album in the States, Taking Liberties was not only a boon for completists (it tacked on a few otherwise unreleased songs so even the most avid import buyer would get something new), it gave a surprisingly clear picture of the many musical avenues Costello had traveled in his first four years -- hard-edged pop/punk ("Clean Money," "Crawling to the USA"), lean power pop ("Big Tears," "I Don't Want to Go to Chelsea"), tough R&B ("Getting Might Crowded"), country weepers ("Radio Sweetheart," "Stranger in the House"), Tin Pan Alley favorites ("My Funny Valentine"), and a few items that defied any classification but "Elvis Costello" ("Ghost Train," "Hoover Factory"). When Costello's American back catalog was reissued by Rykodisc in the 1990s, the various tracks on Taking Liberties were added to other Costello releases as bonus tracks, and the album went out of print. However, its British counterpart, Ten Bloody Marys & Ten How's Your Fathers (originally compiled as a cassette-only U.K. release to give folks with tape decks access to tracks unreleased in the format), which features many of the same tracks, remains in print in Europe. By the way, fans of the album A Gene Vincent Record Date might find that Gregg Geller's liner notes sound rather familiar. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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The Best Of The First 10 Years

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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My Aim Is True (Deluxe Edition)

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 22 juli 1977 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock And Roll Music

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | UMe - Elvis Costello

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My Aim Is True

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 22 juli 1977 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Elvis Costello was as much a pub rocker as he was a punk rocker and nowhere is that more evident than on his debut, My Aim Is True. It's not just that Clover, a San Franciscan rock outfit led by Huey Lewis (absent here), back him here, not the Attractions; it's that his sensibility is borrowed from the pile-driving rock & roll and folksy introspection of pub rockers like Brinsley Schwarz, adding touches of cult singer/songwriters like Randy Newman and David Ackles. Then, there's the infusion of pure nastiness and cynical humor, which is pure Costello. That blend of classicist sensibilities and cleverness make this collection of shiny roots rock a punk record -- it informs his nervy performances and his prickly songs. Of all classic punk debuts, this remains perhaps the most idiosyncratic because it's not cathartic in sound, only in spirit. Which, of course, meant that it could play to a broader audience, and Linda Ronstadt did indeed cover the standout ballad "Alison." Still, there's no mistaking this for anything other than a punk record, and it's a terrific one at that, since even if he buries his singer/songwriter inclinations, they shine through as brightly as his cheerfully mean humor and immense musical skill; he sounds as comfortable with a '50s knockoff like "No Dancing" as he does on the reggae-inflected "Less Than Zero." Costello went on to more ambitious territory fairly quickly, but My Aim Is True is a phenomenal debut, capturing a songwriter and musician whose words were as rich and clever as his music. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Imperial Bedroom

Elvis Costello

Pop - Verschenen op 2 juli 1982 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Having gotten country out of his system with Almost Blue, Elvis Costello returned to pop music with Imperial Bedroom -- and it was pop in the classic, Tin Pan Alley sense. Costello chose to hire Geoff Emerick, who engineered all of the Beatles' most ambitious records, to produce Imperial Bedroom, which indicates what it sounds like -- it's traditional pop with a post-Sgt. Pepper production. Essentially, the songs on Imperial Bedroom are an extension of Costello's jazz and pop infatuations on Trust. Costello's music is complex and intricate, yet it flows so smoothly, it's easy to miss the bitter, brutal lyrics. The interweaving layers of "Beyond Belief" and the whirlwind intro are the most overtly dark sounds on the record, with most of the album given over to the orchestrated, melancholy torch songs and pop singles. Never once do Costello & the Attractions deliver a rock & roll song -- the album is all about sonic detail, from the accordion on "The Long Honeymoon" to the lilting strings on "Town Cryer." Of course, the detail and the ornate arrangements immediately peg Imperial Bedroom as Costello's most ambitious album, but that doesn't mean it's his absolute masterpiece. Imperial Bedroom remains one of Costello's essential records because it is the culmination of his ambitions and desires -- it's where he proves that he can play with the big boys, both as a songwriter and a record-maker. It may not have been a commercial blockbuster, but it certainly earned the respect of legions of musicians and critics who would have previously disdained such a punk rocker. And, perhaps, that's also the reason that he abandoned this immaculately crafted style of work on his next album, Punch the Clock. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Get Happy

Elvis Costello

Pop - Verschenen op 1 februari 1980 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Get Happy!! was born as much from sincere love for soul as it was for Elvis Costello's desire to distance himself from an unfortunate verbal faux pas where he insulted Ray Charles in an attempt to get Stephen Stills' goat. Either way, it resulted in a 20-song blue-eyed soul tour de force, where Costello doesn't just want to prove his love, he wants to prove his knowledge. So, he tries everything, starting with Motown and Northern soul, then touching on smooth uptown ballads and gritty Southern soul, even finding common ground between the two by recasting Sam & Dave's "I Can't Stand Up (For Falling Down)" as a careening stomper. What's remarkable is that this approach dovetails with the pop carnival essayed by Armed Forces, standing as a full-fledged Costello record instead of a genre exercise. As it furiously flits through 20 songs, Costello's cynicisms, rage, humor, and misanthropic sensibility gel remarkably well. Some songs may not quite hit their targets, but that's part of the album's charm -- it moves so fast that its lesser songs rush by on the way to such full-fledged masterpieces as "New Amsterdam," "High Fidelity," and "Riot Act." Get Happy!! bursts with energy and invention, standing as a testament to how Costello, the pop encyclopedia, can reinvent the past in his own image. [The Japanese edition includes bonus material.] © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Blood And Chocolate

Elvis Costello

Pop - Verschenen op 15 september 1986 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Elvis Costello returned to the Attractions as quickly as he abandoned them, hiring the band and old producer Nick Lowe to record Blood & Chocolate, his second record in the span of one year. Where King of America was a stripped-down roots rock affair, Blood & Chocolate is a return to the harder rock of This Year's Model. Occasionally, there are hints of country and folk, but the majority of the album is straight-ahead rock & roll: the opener, "Uncomplicated," only has two chords. The main difference between the reunion and the Attractions' earlier work is the tone -- This Year's Model was tense and out of control, whereas Blood & Chocolate is controlled viciousness. "Tokyo Storm Warning," "I Hope You're Happy Now," and "I Want You" are the nastiest songs he has ever recorded, both lyrically and musically -- Costello snarls the lyrics and the Attractions bash out the chords. Blood & Chocolate doesn't retain that high level of energy throughout the record, however, and loses momentum toward the end of the album. Still, it's a lively and frequently compelling reunion, even if it is a rather mean-spirited one. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Punch The Clock

Elvis Costello

Rock - Verschenen op 5 augustus 1983 | UMe - Elvis Costello

Perhaps frustrated by the lack of commercial success Imperial Bedroom encountered, Elvis Costello enlisted British hitmakers Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley to produce its follow-up, Punch the Clock. The difference between the two records is immediately noticeable. Punch the Clock has a slick, glossy surface, complete with layered synthesizers, horns, studio effects, and the backup vocals of Afrodiziak. The approach isn't necessarily a misguided one, since Costello is as much a pop musician as he is a singer/songwriter and many of the best moments on the record -- "Everyday I Write the Book," "Let Them All Talk" -- work well as shiny pop singles. However, the problem with Punch the Clock is that Costello is entering a fallow songwriting period; it is his least consistent set of original songs to date. The best moments, the antiwar ballad "Shipbuilding" and the eerie pseudo-rap "Pills and Soap," are as articulate and effective as any of his past work, but frequently Costello falls short of meeting his standards, particularly when he's trying to write a song in the style of his older songs. Nevertheless, the sheen of the Langer and Winstanley production makes Punch the Clock a pleasurable listen. Costello's uneven writing means that only portions of the album are memorable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Goodbye Cruel World

Elvis Costello

Pop - Verschenen op 18 juni 1984 | UMe - Elvis Costello

During the making of Goodbye Cruel World, Elvis Costello was undergoing a multitude of personal problems, including a divorce, that resulted in a number of poor production decisions and ill-conceived, unformed songs. Like Punch the Clock, Goodbye Cruel World was produced by Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley, the top British hitmakers of the '80s. Consequently, most of the record suffers from a stiff, synthesized production that instantly dates the record. In some cases -- like the duet with Daryl Hall, "The Only Flame in Town," and the cover of the lost Hi R&B gem "I Wanna Be Loved" -- the songs benefit from the shiny, streamlined production but it obscures the merits of the finest songs on the album. "Room with No Number," "The Comedians," "Sour Milk-Cow Blues," and "Peace in Our Time" all cry out for a simple, stripped-down presentation, but they're weighted down with stylized sounds and trendy synthesizers; however, once the sound of the album settles in, the strength of these songs is apparent. The remainder of Goodbye Cruel World isn't as memorable, primarily because Costello's uninspired vocals and the Attractions' muted performances fail to make the weaker songs musically compelling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo