Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES€ 22,49
CD€ 14,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 oktober 2021 | SWR Classic

Hi-Res Booklet
A modest event in the world of reissues. As part of their vast and fascinating edition dedicated to Hans Rosbaud (1895-1962), the SWR radio team unveil completely new interpretations of two symphonies by Jean Sibelius (2nd, 4th), a composer that the Austrian conductor, who in the 1950s was an ardent defender of even the most brutal modernism at the Donaueschingen Festival and who was one of Pierre Boulez's mentors, has never shied away from conducting.In 1955 Deutsche Grammophon embarked on a series of recordings to celebrate the Finnish composer's ninetieth birthday, releasing an entire LP of Sibelius' works with Hans Rosbaud conducting the Berliner Philharmoniker. Leading it, a strange Tapiola, modern, princely and surprising, not to be missed.In Baden-Baden, Hans Rosbaud was also celebrating the composer with his Sudwestfunkorchester, and on two evenings, the 6th and 7th of December 1955, on the eve of Sibelius' birthday (8th December), he conducted the great Finnish bass Kim Borg in three songs, and the Fifth Symphony. In January of the same year, on the 7th January 1955, he had taken the defence of the Second Symphony. In January 1961, he returned to Sibelius with the extraordinary Fourth. Hans Rosbaud is particularly sensitive to the architecture of the works, always choosing a tempo that is appropriate and fluid. In this respect, the Second Symphony may surprise you by the very moderate tempo of its opening movement, and yet what a beautiful momentum towards the final coda. The Fourth offered here by the SWR is unforgettable, as Rosbaud unveils such extraordinary intervals. The tempo is restrained, and the atmosphere perfectly desolate without being demonstrative until it becomes quite "soaring" in Il tempo largo, before it turns into the truly cataclysmic finale (Allegro). With great aptness and naturalness, Rosbaud lets us hear all the rough timbre combinations (woodwinds and brass), a rare quality indeed. This 4th will fascinate those who remember Herbert von Karajan (1965) conducting this work, as you will probably hear an affinity in the musical visions.Some days before the Parisian audiences welcomed the great Finnish conductor Tauno Hannikainen for a concert at the head of the R.T.F. Orchestra, Hans Rosbaud conducted the Fifth at Baden-Baden. Here again, the Austrian conductor distinguished himself by his attention to orchestral detail—the string phrasing in the Allegro molto—and by his continuous search for Sibelius' tonal singularity, unparalleled in the landscape of European musical modernism. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
From
CD€ 59,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 oktober 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
In 2016, SWR Music launched the Michael Gielen Edition, charting the long and distinguished career of the German-Austrian conductor and composer who died in 2019. This tenth instalment contains over seven hours of music written after 1945 and includes several premiere recordings. The volume begins with Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s Requiem for a Young Poet, a harrowing portrayal of the 20th century, and continues with Ligeti’s Requiem, George Crumb’s Star-Child, and works by Nono, Feldman, Kurtág, Kagel, Boulez and Cage. Gielen championed composers he believed in; with this final instalment listeners can experience some of the most extraordinary music of the 20th century. © SWR Classic
From
CD€ 19,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 oktober 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
Ida Haendel (1928-2020) was one of the violin legends of the 20th century, a true individual whose seven-decade performing career reached back to the golden age of violin playing. This collection brings together concertos by Brahms, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Dvorák, Khachaturian and Bartók, all of which Haendel played during the years leading up to 1967 under the baton of Hans Müller-Kray and the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart. These recordings are among the most valuable treasures in today’s SWR archive. © SWR Classic
From
HI-RES€ 14,99
CD€ 9,99

Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 10 september 2021 | SWR Classic

Hi-Res Booklet
Michael Praetorius saw his most important mission as a composer in the promoting and spreading of the German-language chorale. His collection Musae Sioniae consists of altogether nine volumes and is virtually a complete edition of the Lutheran chorales in every setting imaginable. The Christmas hymns in Musae Sioniae, today just as popular as in that time, were of particular importance for Praetorius. He took greatest care in handling them and presented them often in many different settings. Most of the Christmas hymns selected for this album are also to be heard in different settings, from ornate bicinia and tricinia (in which only two or three of the same voices are used) to magnificent polychorals with two or three choirs, the choral texture so masterful that even the most complicated counterpoint is clearly audible.© SWR Classic
From
CD€ 19,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 september 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
Sir Roger Norrington has been chief conductor of the former Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra (today the SWR Symphonieorchester) for thirteen years. During this time he has caused a stir internationally with what has come to be termed ‘The Stuttgart Sound’: a synthesis of historically-informed performance practice with the technical capabilities of a modern orchestra. Whether in Mozart, Haydn, Bruckner or Brahms, Norrington has sought to capture the performance experience of the time, adjusting the orchestra’s size and seating plan to create an authentic sound without vibrato. The present reissue of Brahms' four symphonies, recorded back in 2005, is no exception to Norrington's artistic credo of keeping as close as possible to the composer's expectations. And one of the main features – beside the "pure sound" without vibrato – are the quick tempi. Brahms left no metronome indications in his symphonies. However, the overall timings left by the Brahms conductor von Bülow are so short, compared to today, that there can have been no very slow tempi in his interpretations. Additionally, Norrington considered also one of the many hints left by another admired conductor and friend of Brahsm, Steinbach: “By all means conduct the opening of BrahmsFirst Symphony in 6. But it must sound in 2”. A German Requiem is one of the most popular compositions by Johannes Brahms. Although the texts are taken from the Bible, the piece is not part of any ecclesiastical-liturgical tradition, it is aimed – as Brahms himself expressly emphasized – at people “who are in mourning” and unlike the "Requiem”, the Catholic Mass of the Dead, it is not a liturgical prayer for the souls of the deceased, but rather intended to console the bereaved.© SWR Classic
From
CD€ 6,99

Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 10 september 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 39,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 augustus 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
Sir Roger Norrington has been chief conductor of the former Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra RSO (today SWR Symphonieorchester) for thirteen years. During this time he caused internationally quite a stir with what got to be called "The Stuttgart Sound", a synthesis between historically informed performance and technical capabilities of a modern orchestra. Whether Mozart or Haydn, Bruckner or Brahms, Norrington's main focus laid on quick tempi, a "pure ton" (that is, vibratoless), articulation, seating plan and orchestra size as experienced by the composers themselves back in their time. With the present re-issue of his Bruckner SWR-recordings, Norrington sought to render the "human face" of Bruckner, not just the quasi-religious abstraction the public is sometimes given instead. His symphonies are secular works written with the Musikverein Vienna in mind. They contain descriptive music (journeys, nature, birds), dance music and humor, unexpected dramatic passages, and pauses. In his entirely individual style (culled from Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn and Wagner, but rarely sounding like any of them), Bruckner echoes memories of his own violin playing as a youth at village weddings, quite as much as those of the St. Florian organ loft. © SWR Classic
From
CD€ 1,19

Rock - Verschenen op 9 juli 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 39,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | SWR Classic

Booklet
The two extended visits in London, in 1791 and 1794, were the greatest triumph in the career of Joseph Haydn. By that time he had already composed 92 symphonies, 12 more came into being while he was in London. The English were stunned by his new masterpieces, which Haydn directed personally. They knew that they were in the presence of the greatest composer in the world. Mozart was already dead and Beethoven not yet known. In September 2009 during the "Europäisches Musikfest" the SWR Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart and Sir Roger Norrington celebrated the memory of Joseph Haydn by performing and recording live all 12 London symphonies. They focused – with regards on orchestra size, seating, tempo, phrasing, articulation and sound – on historical performing style, their aim being to render the majesty, the folk-like simplicity, the infectious sense of dance, the surprises, and the humor characteristic to the Father of the symphony. © SWR Classic
From
CD€ 9,99

Jazz - Verschenen op 11 juni 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
From
CD€ 59,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 14 mei 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
From
HI-RES€ 1,49
CD€ 1,19

Jazz - Verschenen op 14 mei 2021 | SWR Classic

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€ 1,49
CD€ 1,19

Jazz - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

Hi-Res
From
CD€ 1,19

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 1,19

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 1,19

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 1,19

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 1,19

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 1,19

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 april 2021 | SWR Classic

From
CD€ 59,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 12 maart 2021 | SWR Classic

Booklet
Stories about Wunderlich's meteoric rise to success, his incredibly heavy workload or his seemingly effortless acquisition of new repertoire have been told again and again – sometimes painting an idealized and sometimes a distorted picture of the artist. The nine installments of the SWR retrospective that have been released by SWR Classic to this day feature Fritz Wunderlich as a singer of songs, an (unequalled) Mozart tenor, a brilliant interpreter of the greatest tenor hits, a fascinating singer of operettas and as a tasteful interpreter of light music, to name but a few of the genres that made up his repertoire. Though Fritz Wunderlich remains until today a widely appreciated and admired singer, there are some facets to his artistic side that are still relatively unknown. The tenth and last installment presents Fritz Wunderlich as an interpreter of the big works of sacred music, an aspect that has to be considered as an essential part of his artistic profile. © SWR Classic