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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 2 juli 2021 | Solo Musica

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 18 juni 2021 | Solo Musica

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 juni 2021 | Solo Musica

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In the programming of this album, the artist specifically pays attention to finding the way to the musical language of the composers. For years, Seung-Yeun Huh has dedicated herself to the music of Mozart, Liszt and Schubert in order to connect the human beings and the lives of the composers with their existence and to internalize them. A great challenge! The artist has the highest respect for German Romanticism. She ventured into Schumann's work very cautiously and with many open questions. His music held her captive in the special Corona period. With much doubt and admiration, the artist immersed herself in this world. The three works which are brought together on this album are strongly contrasting compositions and yet they have something in common, being at the same time both complex and simple, caught up in individual emotions. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Seung-Yeun Huh studied in Germany, England and the USA. She was awarded several prizes in international competitions and ever since has been giving concerts in the USA, in Asia and in various European countries. The Huh Trio, founded in 1996 together with two of her sisters celebrated twenty years together in 2016. That was the year in which Seung-Yeun Huh founded the AOIDE Trio together with Klaidi Sahatçi, violin, and Sasha Neustroev, cello. In addition to her concert activities Seung-Yeun Huh is prorector at Zurich’s Conservatory of Music (MKZ) and is a qualified arts manager. © Solo Musica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 14 mei 2021 | Solo Musica

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The new Solo Musica recording "Promenade" of Frédéric Chopin's Préludes, Op. 28 and Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition brings together two prominent piano cycles that are almost emblematic of their creators' oeuvre. In the juxtaposition, pianist Andrea Kauten shows what unites them despite all the expected contrasts, which goes far beyond some obvious references by Mussorgsky to Chopin's Préludes. Both large-scale cycles combine miniatures of partly aphoristic character. They stand in the tension between European art music and the national influences of Eastern European and Slavic traditions. For the time being, they seek different solutions. The cosmopolitan Chopin, rejecting any demonstrative patriotism, manages the seamless integration of his Polish idiom into a universally European expression. Mussorgsky, as a self-confessed post-cosmopolitan, emphatically recalled the folk-Russian, which he offensively opposed to everything "Western". Both composers found their way to a personalised musical language which, while freely handling the form, allows the traditional harmonies to be broken up by deliberate instabilities. Both meet on the path to modernity. Even if emotional exhibitionism was alien to both composers and the works can only be related to the biographical snapshots of their genesis with extreme caution: Both cycles are set against the background of a confrontation with death that is as surprising as it is inexorable.
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 16 april 2021 | Solo Musica

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What a title? What can the two numbers 60-90 mean? The reference to numbers plays a fundamental role in Bach's work. Johann Sebastian Bach built an incredible structure and communication into his works on the foundation of numbers, in the spirit of Soli Deo Gloria – Glory to God alone. All the works on this album are by Johann Sebastian Bach, or have a direct link to him. For example, he arranged the Oboe Concerto by Alessandro Marcello for solo keyboard, and we use Bach’s ornaments in our performance of it. Piazzolla and Shostakovich make reference to The Well-Tempered Clavier. The main work presented here is Bach’s Concerto in D minor, BWV 1052, which he transcribed for his own use as a harpsichord concerto. The original version no longer exists, but was for a string instrument: violin or violoncello piccolo, an instrument Bach used in his cantatas. Julius Berger and Andrei Pushkarev have made an arrangement of this piece for violoncello piccolo, a cello tuned a fifth higher. The orchestral part is played by vibraphone and marimba. The transfer to other instruments corresponds to the practice of Bach himself. A special feature of our recording is the continuous peaceful pulsation of about 60 beats per minute, a rhythm that calms and brings introspection. The instrumentation used here reflects our deeper objective: vibraphone and marimba giving the heartbeat, to which the cello crafts a life-melody – keeping the spirit of the works performed but in a modern interpretation. The close relationship between rhythm in the music and human pulse creates an atmosphere in this recording that we believe and hope corresponds to what Bach noted in his Lutheran Bible: "Where there is devotional music, God with his grace is always present". © Solo Musica
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 26 maart 2021 | Solo Musica

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A string quartet by Richard Wagner or Gustav Mahler? Isn't that what the music world has always wanted? The Voyager Quartet goes on a soul-searching tour. From "Villa Wahnfried", sounding love letters, coded messages and secret messages are delivered, written by Richard Wagner and Gustav Mahler, addressed to their muses Alma and Mathilde. A psychogram in beguiling tones about the unspeakable in those days. Andreas Höricht, violist of the quartet, who received the highest international acclaim for his transcription of Schubert's Winterreise for String Quartet, goes one step further. Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder, Mahler's Piano Quartet, movements and fragments from his 5th and 10th symphonies are "recomposed" for string quartet - the medium for spiritual messages. © Solo Musica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 26 maart 2021 | Solo Musica

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Jean-Nicolas Diatkine comes from a family of recognized doctors and considers commitment to others to be the basis of his profession. It seemed impossible for him to do without this basic attitude in the exercise of his profession, which is why he always sees his artistic development as a return to the essential artistic values to which he has devoted himself over the last thirty years. At the same time, he makes the in-depth study and deeper understanding of the narrative of each composer an absolute priority and an indispensable step before any public performance of a work. Diatkine about Beethoven: Musician-performers might regard the need to introduce and explain the pieces they are about to play as an implicit admission of failure, acknowledging the fact that music might no longer speak for itself. Goethe’s irritated reaction to Schubert’s settings of his poems was of the same order, although in reverse perspective: according to him, music was already included in his poetry. And Beethoven (like Bach) created such a vast, structured world that it defies any attempt at literary explanation for it does not need any. The following presentation illustrates this paradox. © solo musica
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 maart 2021 | Solo Musica

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Composer Philippe Racine on his Adagio for String Quintet (2018-2019): “I have composed this Adagio for string quintet at the request of my friend Walter Grimmer; it should be played in concert before the great String Quintet in C by Schubert. What a story! What kind of hillock have I created next to the Himalaya of chamber music? Well, I have written a type of music with which I have striven to stay true to my own self. And yet the piece begins with Schubert’s closing trills for the two cellos and repeatedly a C major chord pops up, mostly delicately, but just once entirely explicitly. And as a reference to the Adagio from the great Austrian, I’ve given the second cello some repeated pizzicati to play. And as a gift for my friend who gave me this commission: a short cadenza from the second cello, followed by a coda in which both violins repeat the opening pizzicati two octaves higher. And the piece ends with a long deep C note, which should serve to introduce the beginning of the Schubert. And now you enter into a totally different dimension...” The 3G Quartet was set up in 2004 for a series of concerts and the recording of the two string quartets by Klaus Huber. Overwhelming reactions inspired the four musicians to continue with further favorite projects : the quartets by Heidi Baader-Nobs as well as works by Schumann, Haydn, Mozart. The recording of the quintets by Franz Schubert and Philippe Racine completes a circle of their activity. Since 1965 Walter Grimmer has taught more than two generations of young cellists, firstly at the Academy of Arts in Berne, then from 2002 at the Zurich Academy for Arts. © Solo Musica
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 maart 2021 | Solo Musica

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If a composer writes 24 caprices for the violin, and if he himself is also a uniquely virtuoso violinist, then a comparison with the 24 Caprices by Paganini is inevitable: Henri Marteau was not only appreciated and revered as one of the greatest violinists of his time, but his compositional work was lost in the background. He shared this fate with Niccolò Paganini, who was also experienced during his lifetime more as a "warlock" of the violin than as a serious composer and musician. So, if this comparison is almost inevitable, it must be mentioned that Paganini himself, with his main work published in 1820, also took up the example of other composers, such as the Etudes and Caprices of Rodolphe Kreutzer. The subtitle of Henri Marteau's Caprices, "d'exécution transcendante" is also very revealing. Moreover, Marteau has his miniatures accompanied throughout by the piano, unlike Paganini, who uses the violin alone. The violin virtuoso Ingolf Turban considered his own violin class at the Hochschule München predestined for this first recording of all 24 of Marteau's Caprices. So together they dared to do the almost unbelievable: all twelve students in his class were involved in this mammoth task, the absolute peak of which, of course, lies in the very elaborate piano accompaniment. Here he engaged the pianist Tomoko Nishikawa, who confidently took on this mammoth task! Ingolf Turban also described himself as the "13th student", so to speak, so he took the caprices for his own playing from the "rest", which for hidden reasons was rather spurned, and gladly took part in it. The present recording is the result of a live concert on 12 December 2017 in the large hall of the Munich Musikhochschule and a smaller event on 7 October 2019. © Solo Musica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 maart 2021 | Solo Musica

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This is a selection of Lieder by Swiss composers – to give a superficial description of the songs recorded for this album. Making such a selection involves making decisions. What is important? What is essential? Are the chosen songs gems or rarities? Do they exemplify the work of the respective composers? A selection can be both a winnowing-out and a compilation. Each of these actions applies to the Lieder presented here. The recordings (re)present debut or early works, and also rarely heard works by established composers. This album centres on the Seven Winter Songs, Op. 1 by Hans Schaeuble (1906-1988). The words and music of the Lieder have now appeared in print, and this premiere recording was made in consequence. The music edition of the Sieben Winterlieder Op. 1 is based on a calligraphic manuscript in the Zurich Central Library, which is clearly a fair copy illustrated by Schaeuble’s brother Erich. The singer Luca Bernard is a study prize winner of Migros Kulturprozent. From the 2019/20 season he became a member of the International Opera Studio at Zurich Opera House. At the Zurich University of the Arts, pianist Hans Adolfsen has a Lied class together with pianist and composer Daniel Fueter, whose encounters with music and literature have provided him with a new source of inspiration. © Solo Musica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 12 februari 2021 | Solo Musica

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Then as now, the music of “Les Six“ is a fascinating kaleidoscope of musical ideas and friendship; an idiosyncratic preciousness full of musical avant-garde, everyday melancholy, profound curiosities, virtuosity and passion that is in need of rediscovery. The collaborative work “L’Album des Six“ was created in 1920, to which each of the six composers Georges Auric, Louis Durey, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud, Francis Poulenc and Germaine Tailleferre contributed a piece. Arranged alphabetically, the album summarizes the composers through their connection with various aesthetic ideas, different personalities and lifelong friendship. 100 years later, the “L’Album des Six“ is expanded with corresponding song cycles from their oeuvres: In addition to well-known compositions by Francis Poulenc and Darius Milhaud, the first releases of the song cycles by Georges Auric (1940) and Louis Durey (1920) enrich the album in a special way. © Solo Musica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 5 februari 2021 | Solo Musica

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The Twiolins are the siblings Marie-Luise and Christoph Dingler, specialists in the violin duo genre. Having grown up in a musical environment, they have achieved the highest degree of interplay and a unique sound identity through their shared curriculum vitae and constant playing together. Why Vivaldi and Piazzolla? Or to put it another way: why, after more than ten years of searching and working on new compositions, does the duo now devote itself to two deceased composers who could hardly be more opposite? Adapting Kremer's project Eight Seasons and transforming it into a typical "Twiolins project" is unusual for the Twiolins, but it was almost dream walkingly simple. Thus it was clear to the duo that the "Eight Seasons" had to evolve, through their own interpretation, transformation and growth. In short: an evolution was necessary. Nevertheless, it was an adventure to play the Four Seasons from Vivaldi on two violins arrange. Years of playing together gave them enough experience to be able to present Vivaldi's masterpiece appropriately - without reducing the content of the work. Both Vivaldi and Piazzolla have undergone a transformation and show us new aspects in this chamber music version that have never been heard before in these great works of world literature ... © Solo Musica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 januari 2021 | Solo Musica

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The Geneva Chamber Orchestra (formerly the Collegium Academicum founded by Robert Dunand in 1958) and its conductor Arie Van Beek invite us on an armchair journey into the heart of the traditions of the free city of Geneva (before it was ceded to Switzerland in 1815 at the end of the Napoleonic conquests), which was home to Calvin and his friends the Reformers, before becoming a city of art and peace, which to this day remains wide open to the world.Dedicated to two Genevan composers, Frank Martin (1890-1974) and Xavier Dayer (born 1972), the project of this beautiful album has suffered the full force of the vicissitudes of the strange year 2020 and the health crisis that has destroyed cultural life throughout the planet. Xavier Dayer and cellist Estelle Revaz worked via audio messages and computer files before meeting at the Ernest Ansermet studio in Geneva to make this recording, duly masked like almost all musicians, with the exception of wind instrumentalists.Lignes d’Est by Xavier Dayer is actually a cello concerto written for the OCG and the soloist on this album. According to the composer "the work is animated by the idea that each of the instrumental parts retains its own autonomy, its own story, while inscribing itself in an inexorable direction, like lines of flight in a vast landscape". Frank Martin wrote his Cello Concerto in 1965-1966 for Pierre Fournier, who first performed it under the direction of Paul Sacher. Curiously ignored by cellists, it is a very lyrical work in a rather classical scheme which uses an orchestra which, while reduced in size, is rich in timbres and various sounds. Much earlier, the Ballade for Cello and Small Orchestra is part of a group of similar works composed by Frank Martin to showcase various solo instruments. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 6 november 2020 | Solo Musica

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | Solo Musica

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2020 | Solo Musica

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 25 september 2020 | Solo Musica

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Koormuziek - Verschenen op 7 augustus 2020 | Solo Musica

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 juli 2020 | Solo Musica

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Schubert’s symphonies have been very popular in recent years. The fact that they belong to early Viennese classicism (the first six at least), coming in the wake of Haydn and Mozart, is a blessing for so-called "authentic" performances. The rest are part of a romanticism that favours a wider expression. With a Ghanaian father and German mother, Kevin John Edusei grew up in Bielefeld before studying in Berlin and then in the United States where he worked with David Zinman who became his mentor. Back in Europe, the young conductor was appointed Principal Conductor of the Munich Symphony Orchestra in 2013. Together with his orchestra, he gives a light and delicate performance of Symphony No. 3, composed by an eighteen-year-old Schubert. It brilliantly contrasts with the other unfinished symphony, the Seventh (as numbered) in E major, D 729. Presumably composed in August, 1821, only the first 110 bars are fully finished. The rest is incomplete but “entirely noted” according to Felix Weingartner who was the first person to patiently try to reconstruct the composition. This was before the work of the English musicologist Brian Newbould, who produced the new version presented here in 1980. However, the work has never been part of the repertoire. Yet, as Kevin John Edusei points out in the libretto of this album, this Seventh symphony represents a fascinating link between youth and maturity that would lead Schubert to his Great Symphony in C major after having, once again, forsaken his Symphony in B minor. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 juni 2020 | Solo Musica

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