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Opera - Released May 1, 2015 | Brilliant Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Symphonic Music - Released July 13, 2012 | Berlin Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Cantatas (secular) - Released July 9, 2021 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Secular Vocal Music - Released February 19, 2009 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1983 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

Kurt Masur’s burnished readings of Brahms’s orchestral music with the Gewandhausorchester LeipzigHardly less than with its founder, Felix Mendelssohn, the Leipzig Gewandhaus grew up with Brahms conducting and playing. For a sense of heritage, the orchestra boasts a Brahms tradition second to none. In the words of Kurt Masur, their Kapellmeister for over a quarter of a century, ‘if they play Brahms, you can say it’s still authentic’. Eloquence has compiled the Brahms recordings they made together between 1973 and 1981 for both the East-German Eterna label and Philips. Together they form the most comprehensive documentation yet issued of a musical relationship between composer, conductor and ensemble that was uniformly distinguished by deep understanding and affection. From the keyboard lion’s roaring of the First Piano Concerto to the rage and reconciliation of the Third Symphony and the mellow reflections of the Double Concerto, Masur and the Leipzigers present Brahms in the round. ‘Tradition is everything to the Gewandhaus,’ said Masur. ‘It’s what gives us our identity. It’s why we sound like ourselves and not like any other orchestra.’ The bedrock of that sound is a strong, unified string section with a density of timbre that supplies all the required weight for the post-Beethovenian drama of the First and Fourth symphonies. Masur maintained a narrow, brightly illuminated palette of wind tone-colours that lends a ruddy glow to the more pastoral tones of the Second as well as the rustic orchestrations of the Hungarian Dances and the oboe-led slow movement of the Violin Concerto. The 1978 recording of the concerto finds its soloist Salvatore Accardo on his most honeyed and alluring form, contrastingly partnered in the Double Concerto by the gruffer, more outspoken tones of the cellist Heinrich Schiff. Masur and the Gewandhaus made several recordings of the piano concertos; Eloquence returns to the earliest and least-familiar of them, made with the American pianist Misha Dichter in 1977 when he was a peerless exponent of Liszt, in performances that grab the listener by the scruff of the neck and never let go. (Decca)
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Classical - Released January 1, 1975 | Eterna

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Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 and his Missa Solemnis have a lot in common. Both works come from the composer's last decade. Both works are massively scored for soloists, chorus, and orchestra and both aspire to reveal Beethoven's beatific vision in sound. But for their similarities, Beethoven's Ninth and his Missa Solemnis are not the same work. There are crucial musical differences, one is about its themes while the other is about its text, and there is an even more fundamental difference: one is a symphony while the other is a mass. More bluntly put, one is merely the embodiment of the Enlightenment and the other is a setting of the word of God. Which, when you think about it, is quite a big difference. The problem is that Kurt Masur doesn't seem to have thought about it because while his 1972 recording of the Missa Solemnis with his Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra is in every way as great as his contemporaneous recording of the Ninth, and it is the same sort of greatness, a secular humanist greatness. Which, as greatness goes, is pretty great; but as superbly sung, superlatively played, and supremely human as Masur's Missa Solemnis is, it lacks spirituality. The true greatness of the Missa Solemnis is its overwhelming sense that the numinous is imminent and for all the real and honest greatness of Masur's recording, one never senses the eternal or the infinite in his Missa Solemnis. Berlin's stereo sound was a bit gray in its day and this digital remastering is only a bit less gray. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released January 31, 1972 | RCA Classics

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Classical - Released February 18, 1994 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released May 4, 2010 | Warner Classics International

In its way -- its very, very Teutonic way -- this is a great set of Tchaikovsky's symphonies and piano concertos. Not only does it contain all six numbered symphonies plus the Manfred Symphony and all three numbered concertos plus the Concert Fantasia, but it also contains several of the composer's best-known symphonic fantasies -- Romeo and Juliet plus Francesca da Rimini -- and a whole disc of his best-known waltzes culled from ballets and other sources. Beyond the repertoire, it features expert orchestral playing from either the Gewandhausorchester -- big, warm, and full -- and the New York Philharmonic -- big, cool, and clear -- and a brilliant soloist in pianist Elisabeth Leonskaja. And on top of that, it features the skillful and dedicated conducting of Kurt Masur, who comprehends and appreciates the less-known works like the Third Symphony, as well as the best-known works like the Fifth Symphony. Of course, the whole production is very, very Teutonic: the sound of the orchestras is heavier, the articulation of the playing is weightier, the phrasing is smoother, the textures are ampler, the colors are blended, and the rhythms are more on the downbeat. For some listeners, this may be the wrong approach to take to the Russian, all too Russian, Tchaikovsky, and for them, there are plenty of Russian recordings to choose from. But for listeners who already know Tchaikovsky as a Russian and long to hear Tchaikovsky as a German, Masur's approach, full of rugged integrity and gritty strength as it is, may be preferable to Herbert von Karajan's approach, full of smooth polish and refined sonorities as it is. Warner Classics' digital sound is large scale in scope but small scale in details. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 29, 2011 | Warner Classics

Symphonic Music - Released March 15, 2019 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released May 1, 2005 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

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Symphonic Music - Released July 8, 2008 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released July 1, 1996 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1991 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released April 30, 1999 | Warner Classics International

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Symphonic Music - Released October 12, 2003 | LucasRecords

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Classical - Released April 30, 1999 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released May 15, 2020 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.