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Ian Bostridge|Tormento d’Amore

Tormento d’Amore

Ian Bostridge

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Even well into his late fifties, tenor Ian Bostridge remains as popular as ever, and this collection of Baroque arias has had typical commercial success. One may ask just why he is so consistently well-liked. His voice is quite well preserved, but it has never had the athletic quality one associates with Baroque opera; for pure opera singing, one might choose any number of other voices. A major factor is his ability to put together programs that illuminate deeply a certain place and time. This album is called Tormento d'Amore ("the torments of love"), and it constitutes a varied treatment of that theme, with moods ranging from melancholy to angry. However, there are other main ideas here. Bostridge traces the center of operatic gravity as it moved from Venice to Naples; Naples, the eighth-largest city in the world by 1750, was growing in commercial and artistic importance. The music runs in a chain from Francesco Cavalli, who trained many of the next generation, including some of the Neapolitans, to Vivaldi. In between are composers known mostly to specialists (there are a couple of world premieres), including Cristofaro Caresana, Francesco Provenzale, and Leonardo Vinci; if for nothing else, this album would be noteworthy for bringing into circulation the likes of Provenzale's gorgeous "Che speri, o mio core," from Il schiavo di sua moglie (1672). Another point of emphasis for Bostridge is that these are all tenor arias, and that has historically been a neglected genre in the Baroque. It may be the countertenors (and now sopranos) who got the big numbers, but Bostridge indicates what riches are out there in tenor parts. The accompaniment by Cappella Neapolitana under Antonio Florio is properly circumspect. It all adds up to a compelling hour that submerges the listeners into deep musical currents. Parlophone's sound from the Palazzo Positano in Naples is ideal.
© TiVo

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Tormento d’Amore

Ian Bostridge

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1
L'Orfeo: Sinfonia
00:01:52

Ian Bostridge, MainArtist - Antonio Sartorio, Composer - Aurelio Aureli, Poet - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

2
Eliogabalo, Act 1: "Io resto solo?...Misero, così va’ aria di Eliogabalo"
00:03:55

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Francesco Cavalli, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

3
Il corispero, Act 1: "Soffrirà, spererà"
00:01:27

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Alessandro Stradella, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

4
Il tito, Act 1: “Berenice, ove sei?"
00:09:41

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Pietro Antonio Cesti, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

5
L’Argia: Sinfonia
00:02:04

Ian Bostridge, MainArtist - Pietro Antonio Cesti, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

6
Le avventure di una fede: "Tien ferma Fortuna"
00:02:41

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cristoforo Caresana, Composer - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

7
La Stellidaura, Act 1: "Deh rendetemi ombre care"
00:05:02

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Francesco Provenzale, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra - Francesco Antonio Paolella, Poet

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

8
Il schiavo di sua moglie: Sinfonia
00:01:54

Ian Bostridge, MainArtist - Francesco Provenzale, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra - Francesco Antonio Paolella, Poet

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

9
Il schiavo di sua moglie, Act 1: "Che speri o mio core"
00:07:17

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Francesco Provenzale, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra - Francesco Antonio Paolella, Poet

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

10
Il totila: Sinfonia
00:01:51

Ian Bostridge, MainArtist - Giovanni Legrenzi, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

11
Siroe, Act 1: "Se il mio paterno amore"
00:03:31

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Leonardo Vinci, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

12
Siroe, Act 1: "Gelido in ogni vena"
00:06:29

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Leonardo Vinci, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

13
Il faraone sommerso: Sinfonia
00:03:39

Ian Bostridge, MainArtist - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Nicola Fago, Composer - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

14
Il faraone sommerso, Act 1: "Nuove straggi e spaventi”
00:02:14

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Nicola Fago, Composer - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

15
Farnace, RV 711, Act 2: "Gelido in ogni vena" (Farnace)
00:11:44

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Antonio Vivaldi, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

16
Lu cardillo
00:03:23

Ian Bostridge, Tenor Vocals, MainArtist - Anonymous, Composer - Antonio Florio, Conductor - Cappella Neapolitana, Orchestra

© 2022 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company ℗ 2021 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

Album Description

Even well into his late fifties, tenor Ian Bostridge remains as popular as ever, and this collection of Baroque arias has had typical commercial success. One may ask just why he is so consistently well-liked. His voice is quite well preserved, but it has never had the athletic quality one associates with Baroque opera; for pure opera singing, one might choose any number of other voices. A major factor is his ability to put together programs that illuminate deeply a certain place and time. This album is called Tormento d'Amore ("the torments of love"), and it constitutes a varied treatment of that theme, with moods ranging from melancholy to angry. However, there are other main ideas here. Bostridge traces the center of operatic gravity as it moved from Venice to Naples; Naples, the eighth-largest city in the world by 1750, was growing in commercial and artistic importance. The music runs in a chain from Francesco Cavalli, who trained many of the next generation, including some of the Neapolitans, to Vivaldi. In between are composers known mostly to specialists (there are a couple of world premieres), including Cristofaro Caresana, Francesco Provenzale, and Leonardo Vinci; if for nothing else, this album would be noteworthy for bringing into circulation the likes of Provenzale's gorgeous "Che speri, o mio core," from Il schiavo di sua moglie (1672). Another point of emphasis for Bostridge is that these are all tenor arias, and that has historically been a neglected genre in the Baroque. It may be the countertenors (and now sopranos) who got the big numbers, but Bostridge indicates what riches are out there in tenor parts. The accompaniment by Cappella Neapolitana under Antonio Florio is properly circumspect. It all adds up to a compelling hour that submerges the listeners into deep musical currents. Parlophone's sound from the Palazzo Positano in Naples is ideal.
© TiVo

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