Albums

3580 albums gesorteerd op Date: from newest to oldest en gefilterd op Kamermuziek
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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 13 oktober 2017 | Cedille

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 13 oktober 2017 | Alpha

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 13 oktober 2017 | Navona

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Kwartetten - Verschijnt op 13 oktober 2017 | BMC Records

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 6 oktober 2017 | BIS

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 6 oktober 2017 | BIS

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 6 oktober 2017 | Albany

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 6 oktober 2017 | Revels Records

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Kamermuziek - Verschijnt op 29 september 2017 | PentaTone

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Acclaimed for their adventurous and wide-ranging recording projects – from Beethoven Sonatas on period instruments to genre-bending arrangements of Radiohead and Arcade Fire – the endlessly inventive duo of cellist Matt Haimovitz and pianist Christopher O’Riley returns to explore music of the Slavic soul. Anchored by the cello sonatas of the iconic triumvirate of Russian composers –Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich – and inspired by the subversive irony of Shostakovich’s Sonata, TROIKA also delves into more recently-written, unexpected, and popular works. Whether subtle or blatantly rebellious, each work potently reveals the strength of the artistic voice in the face of political repression in mother Russia. © Pentatone
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Kwartetten - Verschijnt op 29 september 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

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The Arod Quartet, founded just four years ago in Paris, seems to have been destined for Erato: its young players have been mentored by both the Ebène Quartet and the Artemis Quartet, ensembles that have made a substantial contribution to the label’s catalogue of chamber music. Mendelssohn, the composer the Arod Quartet’s members have chosen for the Erato debut, also features in the discographies of both the Ebène and, especially, the Artemis. Moreover, the Arod’s first album has been produced by the Ebène’s former viola player, Mathieu Herzog. The Arod – named after Legolas’ horse in JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings (the name means ‘swift’) – won the high-profile ARD Competition in Munich in 2016 and are now artists-in-residence at the Queen Elisabeth Music Chapel in Brussels, Brussels’ most prestigious musical training institution. In 2014 the quartet took first prize at the Carl Nielsen Chamber Music Competition in Copenhagen in 2015 and in 2014 won the FNAPEC European Competition in Paris. Over the 2017-2018 season the Arod Quartet will perform in Paris at the Philharmonie, Auditorium du Louvre and Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord, in Metz, Bordeaux and Montpellier, at London’s Wigmore Hall, the Salzburg Mozarteum, Vienna Konzerthaus, Brussels Bozar, Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Tonhalle Zurich, Schloss Elmau in Germany, the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisboa and in Italy, Denmark, Serbia and Japan. Festivals to which the Arod Quartet has been invited include Verbier, Montreux, Aix-en-Provence, Menton, Salon-de-Provence, Folle Journée de Nantes, Pablo Casals Festival of Prades, Heidelberg, Rheingau, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Bremen Musikfest, Mozartfest Würzburg and Prague Spring Music Festival. The ensemble has collaborated with such instrumentalists as the viola-players Amihai Grosz and Mathieu Herzog, clarinettists Martin Fröst, Romain Guyot and Michel Lethiec, pianist Eric Lesage, and cellists Raphaël Pidoux, François Salque, Harriet Krijgh and Bruno Philippe. On this debut album of Mendelssohn, the Arod Quartet performs with a singer, the young mezzo-soprano Marianne Crebassa, who is already making her mark as an Erato artist. The string players accompany her in the song ‘Ist es wahr?, which supplied thematic material for the composer’s String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, op 13. The album is completed by the Quartet No. 4 in E minor, op 44 No. 2 and the Four Pieces for String Quartet op 81. As the members of the quartet explain, Mendelssohn has played an important place in their musical life together. “Four years ago the four of us met. We opened our first score in a small, badly-lit room at the Paris Conservatoire, and we started to play.” The music was Mendelssohn’s op 13. “We were overwhelmed with love for the quartet as a form; it had us in its grip and it has never let us go. Time has passed, but op 13 has remained close to our hearts … We have grown up with it, learned with it and won our two biggest competitions with it … Felix Mendelssohn has been so important in our life as a quartet that we have decided to delve into his, conceiving this album as a narrative of his life as a composer, as seen through his works for quartet: the first quartet he composed (op 13); the quartet he wrote in the year he got married, 10 years later (op 44 No. 2), and the four pieces of op 81, written at different periods, but in particular during the last three years of his life.”
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Trio´s - Verschijnt op 29 september 2017 | Berlin Classics

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Johannes Brahms’s Horn Trio Op. 40 is without a doubt the best-known work for this formation and also one of the best-known chamber music pieces ever written for horn. Brahms succeeds like virtually no other composer in utilising the tone colours of this instrument. His trio has entrenched this formation in the stock repertoire of any horn player. It is therefore the centrepiece of this release. But what other works were written for horn trio, and was Brahms the first composer to write for this combination of instruments? What Felix Klieser and his friends have found is a repertoire spanning some 100 years, from Frédéric Duvernoy, who wrote his two trios at the start of the 19th century and was still under the influence of Viennese Classicism, to trios by Charles Koechlin (1867-1950) and Robert Kahn, written in the 20th century but still profoundly Romantic in their expression. That being said, Charles Koechlin, Frédéric Duvernoy and Robert Kahn chart intriguing musical terrain, presenting a variety of influences, forms and aspects of interplay between the three instruments. Each of Koechlin’s Quatre petites pièces Op. 32, written by Charles Koechlin between 1896 and 1906, has a distinctive underlying character. The limited compositional œuvre of Frédéric Duvernoy (1765-1838) immediately suggests that the Frenchman, who worked as a horn player at the Paris Opera and as a soloist , wrote music for his own use, notably horn concertos and works for horn and piano, but also three trios for violin, horn and piano, which were written as Trois trios concertants some time after 1820. These pieces are virtuosic, classically elegant and song-like. Serenade op. 73 by Robert Kahn (1865-1951), published in 1923, was clearly inspired by Schumann and even more so by Brahms.
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Kwartetten - Verschijnt op 24 september 2017 | Rattle

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 22 september 2017 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 22 september 2017 | Sarton Records

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 22 september 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

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Poor Reger! With his pudgy figure and his pouty face, appearances have taken precedence over his music which many consider as pudgy and pouty. Which it is not. Yes, Reger was a firm supporter of absolute music, following the tradition of Beethoven and Brahms whose classical structures he combined with Wagner’s extended harmonies, adding Bach’s counterpoint; some of his works seem dense and complicated. But this is not the case with his chamber music – by the bye, chamber music makes up the biggest part of Reger’s œuvre – which reflects a condensed version of his stylistic development. And in contrast to his almost symphonic string quartets, the String Trios Opp 77b and 141b seem less symbolist-expressive than historistic-classicist. The confident, at times even cheerful (not pudgy and not pouty), character of these works convey the (superficial) impression of simplicity, despite which Reger remained true to his own style, as he explained in a letter where he described the composition as “absolutely not ‘un-Regerian’”. However, the characteristics of this “Regerian” style – dense modulations, surprising metric asymmetries and interesting part writing – are in this case subordinate to the small number of instruments and do not immediately emerge. The composer strove towards a “new simplicity”; in 1904 he wrote: “I know exactly what our music today lacks: a Mozart!” Surely it was also Mozart’s spirit which inspired Reger when he wrote his “miniature chamber music” String Trio Op. 141b in 1915. The same year, the premiere of his Piano Quartet Op. 133 was emphatically celebrated by the critics who praised its “glorious sonorities” and its “vocal, vivid and catchy” melodies. The Op. 77b, String Trio was obviously inspired by Mozart’s Divertimento K563, and the Op. 9 String Trios by Beethoven – as has often been commented upon, Reger frequently enters into an intensive dialogue with historic works of music. Star violinist Franziska Pietsch is joined, in her ensemble Trio Lirico, by a brilliant roster of colleagues, who give life to these highly deserving but neglected works.