The decision to award a Qobuzism is made unanimously by the Qobuz team. In most cases, a Qobuzism is given to a “crossover” album in the best sense of the term, in that it will speak to all of our users.

By awarding a Qobuzism, we aim to draw attention to standout albums across a wide range of genres. In theory a Qobuzism is intended to alert you to an artist’s debut which has ventured into unexplored territory; but albums which merit this distinction can, in practice, come from anywhere! In each instance Qobuz endorses the album entirely, working with the artist in order to give them the greatest exposure possible – both within and outside of Qobuz. 

What we love is to give our Qobuz users the chance to discover recordings which are not necessarily what they would normally go for.

Albums

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Electro - Released April 6, 2015 | Combien Mille Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzism
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Electro - Released July 7, 2014 | Infectious

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Qobuzism
Even if they're not billed as a supergroup, the Acid's three members boast a formidable amount of talent (and other projects): Adam Freeland scored a hit single with 2003's breakbeat-driven "We Want Your Soul" and remixed songs by Orbital and Silversun Pickups, among others; along with his own intimate singer/songwriter fare, Ry X is also one half of Howling; and Steve Nalepa is also a composer, and professor of music technology. This wealth of skills and experience could have led to similarly overstuffed music, but the trio's full-length debut, Liminal, is remarkably restrained in its ever-shifting balance of indie, dance, and R&B. Indeed, the songs that first appeared on the Acid's self-titled EP sound downright lush compared to how spare and sculpted the rest the album is. "Animal" pairs the chiming, Durutti Column-esque guitars that have become a hallmark of this style with revving synths that sound like one part dubstep and one part motorcycle, while "Fame," with its beautiful juxtaposition of fizzy warmth and cool tones, might still be the Acid's most immediately engaging song. Tracks like these offer a gateway to more implosive moments such as "Clean" and "Red," both of which deliver graceful, elongated ebbs and flows that are miles away from the epic drops expected of 2010s dance music. The way the Acid incorporate elements of house and dubstep on Liminal borders on dream logic, particularly on "Veda," where a distant four-on-the-floor beat propels its meditations. Of course, they aren't the only ones fusing these sounds; How to Dress Well, the xx, and James Blake are just some of the most prominent artists working in similar territory. However, Freeland, Nalepa, and X may be the most eclectic in comparison to their contemporaries. Since the Acid boast two accomplished producers, Liminal always sounds intriguing, whether it's the sleek yet feral atmosphere of "Tumbling Lights," which evokes walking through a jungle at night, or the subtle building and blending of acoustic and electronic textures on "Basic Instinct" and "Ra." X's melancholic, Thom Yorke-like tenor is the fulcrum for these explorations, and he sounds at home in whatever backdrops Freeland and Nalepa give him. His storytelling also helps the Acid distinguish themselves from their peers, particularly on the aptly named "Creeper," where a narrative of uneasy desire ("I wanna touch you in a painted stall") unfurls over a pulsing, fractured track that conveys several kinds of tension. In theory, balance and restraint aren't the most exciting virtues for an album to possess, but in practice, Liminal's subtlety is confident and dynamic. ~ Heather Phares
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Electro - Released April 7, 2014 | Olsen Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music - Qobuzism - Hi-Res Audio
After a decade of releasing singles, remixes, and edits to large amounts of acclaim among in-the-know dance music fans, Norwegian whiz kid Todd Terje finally made an album of his own in 2014. It's Album Time is a pretty self-explanatory title, though it could have been called "I Love Many Different Styles of Dance Music and Will Proceed to Put My Warped Spin on All of Them." Well, that one would have been a mouthful, but it does sort of explain what was in Terje's head as he whips from one style to the next over the course of the record's 12 tracks. Stylish neo-disco is what he's best known for, and if any one style dominates, it's that. Bouncy dancefloor fillers like "Strandbar," "Inspector Norse," "Swing Star, Pt. 2," and the light-as-a-feather "Oh Joy" set the dials for the heart of the disco ball and form the shiny center of the album. Terje's unerring grooves and the sophisticated and melodic sounds he lays over the beat make them the easiest tracks to love. He's less successful when heading off the floor and into the chillout lounge ("Leisure Suit Preben"), the tiki room ("Preben Goes to Acapulco"), or whatever strange place the impossible-to-describe (or listen to more than once) "Svensk Sås" resides, though he does get lucky with a guitar-strumming electro '80s style ("Delorean Dynamite") that begs to have some vocoder vocals over the top. The sweeping, ice-colored synths get the job done fine anyway, and it seems like a path Terje would be wise to follow on future releases. The same can't be said for the one vocal feature on the record that finds a sepulchral Bryan Ferry croaking a version of Robert Palmer's "Johnny and Mary" that Terje decides to take at "Chariots of Fire" tempo and with the same level of portentous drama. It's a huge misstep that threatens to derail the album and wipe away all the good that exists. Take it out, along with a couple of filler-y tracks, and It's Album Time is a solid debut. As it stands, it's a hard album to get your head around and it's a hard album to fully embrace. Terje should set aside the experiments and just focus on making sleek and shiny electro-disco tracks; the rest only gets in the way of a good time. ~ Tim Sendra
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Electro - Released February 3, 2014 | InFiné

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Qobuzism - Hi-Res Audio
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Electro - Released November 4, 2013 | InFiné

Hi-Res Distinctions Qobuzism - Hi-Res Audio
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Electro - Released September 2, 2013 | Warp Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Qobuzism - Hi-Res Audio
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Electro - Released April 8, 2013 | Naive

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Qobuzism - Hi-Res Audio
3 stars out of 5 -- "[T]he French duo are as synonymous with hazy Parisian grooves and dreamy vocals as central London is with artisan coffee houses."
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Electro - Released October 22, 2012 | Warp Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Qobuzism - Hi-Res Audio - Sélection JAZZ NEWS
Rewarding as it was for most lovers of 1983 and Los Angeles, Cosmogramma was so complex and knotted that Steven Ellison's next step could have gone beyond the challenging and into the self-parodic. On his fourth album, Ellison not only peels away layers from his sound but organizes his tracks into a gracefully flowing sequence. The producer once again draws from numerous instrumentalists and vocalists, from Brainfeeder associates Stephen "Thundercat" Bruner and Austin Peralta to the likes of Erykah Badu and Thom Yorke. Bruner has the most presence. His tremulous basslines are on nine of the album's 18 tracks, and his spaced-out, quasi-oracular vocals poke through on occasion, such as on an 80-second track that is titled after a natural psychedelic compound and references the title of Ellison's 2010 EP. True to Flying Lotus form, Bruner's voice, as well as those of everyone else, is made to sound phantasmal rather than spotlit. While much of the material on Ellison's previous three albums came across like brief and isolated ideas with an impact unaffected by the shuffle function, the shorter pieces here act more like true connectors or proper set-ups/interludes. The 12 minutes from "See Thru to U" through "Only if You Wanna" make for the album's least divisible section. It begins with lithe and slightly unsettling pattering and closes with a futuristic, organic-synthetic jazz trio piece. Somewhere in the middle, there's "The Nightcaller," the closest the album gets to dancefloor funk like Cosmogramma's "Do the Astral Plane" -- that is, until the last minute, when the gliding/chugging beat stammers and switches to a delirious strut. For all the elegiac and turbulent moments, several tracks, including the majestically wistful "Getting There" and the cascading "Until the Colours Come," are gorgeously starry and even lullaby-like, laced with ear-perking flourishes. And then there's the alien critter voice on "Putty Boy Strut," and the bizarrely bleak and comical "Electric Candyman," featuring Yorke, which arouses some serious cognitive dissonance by provoking thoughts of Tony Todd and Beyoncé ("Say my name, say my name, say my name"). Ellison's trademarks -- skittering and rustling percussion atop slightly irregular drums that knock and thud, for instance -- factor almost as much as ever, but his slight adjustments and increased restraint make this his most accessible and creative release yet. ~ Andy Kellman