Albums

2273 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest and filtered by Concertos
£4.32

Concertos - To be released January 5, 2018 | Avie Records

£3.60

Concertos - To be released December 8, 2017 | Onyx Classics

£7.63
£5.04

Concertos - Released October 20, 2017 | Mariinsky

Hi-Res Booklet
Two "Second Concertos" from two great Russians, by two great Russians - now there's something to write home about. The first two are Rachmaninov and Prokofiev; the second two are Denis Matsuev and Valery Gergiev, all against the sumptuous backdrop of the Mariinsky Orchestra. Matsuev (b.1975), you may remember, won the prestigious Tchaikovsky Prize in 1998, which launched his global career. His broad repertoire covered a number of great Russians, including the winning quartet of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Prokofiev and Shostakovich. His interpretations are distinguished by their animal power; their sense of rubato which is at once fierce and controlled; and sparkling technique. This recording makes great use of an ensemble sound, rather than setting up an "opposition" of piano and orchestra: and it must be said, this is precisely the way to do justice to the wonderful Mariinsky sound. © SM/Qobuz
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£4.32

Concertos - Released October 20, 2017 | Onyx Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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£10.79

Violin Concertos - Released October 13, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet
Following Sergei Prokofiev’s works for violin and piano, Franziska Pietsch now presents an album featuring both Violin Concertos of the Russian composer, with whose oeuvre and idiom the artist – a former promising star of the GDR – has felt at home ever since her youth. Alongside Cristian Măcelaru and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin she presents a thrilling new recording. The two violin concertos represent two phases in, and two sides of, Prokofiev’s life and work. The first was written during an era of early successes, stylistically and temporally close to his Symphonie classique, but not premiered until he was in exile. The second mirrors the itinerant existence of his life as a musician in exile, but also his longing to return to Russia. © Audite
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£3.60

Concertos - Released October 6, 2017 | Avie Records

Hi-Res Booklet
£7.19

Concertos - Released October 3, 2017 | ZKP RTVSLO

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Concertos - Released October 3, 2017 | ZKP RTVSLO

£20.99
£18.49

Concertos - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
The previous batch from the 2015 Lugano Festival was especially rich, with many of the chosen moments being particularly thrilling (Brahms’ Trio, Poulenc’s Sonata for two pianos). The 2016 Festival would in turn see one great event: the tremendous Martha agreed to play on stage, for the first time in more than thirty years, Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit. She was worried at the thought of measuring herself against her own success from forty years ago—she recorded in 1974 for Deutsche Grammophon a Ravel LP featuring Gaspard, Sonatine and Valses nobles et sentimentales, which is still in everyone’s memory despite its disappointing sound recording. On the spot, it’s obviously all the magic from a sound completely revealing itself, and the permanence of a vision. The truly haunted tone of Le Gibet leaves a lasting impression, Scarbo’s goblin literally shatters when Ondine, completely radiant, screams her recollections of Liszt and remembers just as much Une barque sur l’océan written a few years before. The rest of the testimonies from this 2016 Lugano Festival is as varied as usual. We’ll start with the rarity among the musical repertoire that is Busoni’s Violin Concerto, in D major (like the ones from Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky), also being the opus 35 (like the ones from Tchaikovsky, Korngold), under Renaud Capuçon’s determined bow. As for the two pianos, a classic from Argerich’s repertoire, Mozart Sonata for Two Pianos K. 488 that she’s enjoyed playing regularly with her friends for a few years, here with Sergey Babayan. And let’s not forget the very sincere Horn Trio from Brahms, with the trio Capuçon, Angelich & Guerrier (in 2015, a version without horn was unforgettable), or especially Bach’s Sonata by Martha Argerich and Tedi Papavrami, which could make us forget to not have this duo play the five other works written by Bach for the same formation. We cannot ignore the too short moment from the duo Tiempo & Lechner, as thrilling as ever, here in two Falla’s dances. During this 2016 edition, Argerich also played Ravel’s Concerto in G major. Maybe not in its most extraordinary version, but listening to its phrasings, accents, and nuances that are so personal in the Adagio assai this work remains the source of a rare emotion. May this Lugano Festival resuscitate in a few years with the participation of generous sponsors nostalgic of these incredible moments. © PYL
£18.49

Concertos - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Concertos - Released August 25, 2017 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet
Serge Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto might never have seen the light of day had it not been for hypnosis: before the twenty-seven-year-old composer began work on it, he was on his last legs – financially, artistically and psychologically. Dr Nikolay Dahl hypnotised his patient every day, whispering to him: ‘You will write your concerto. You will work with great fluency. The concerto will be of excellent quality.’ The creative block disappeared, and the concerto’s premiere in Moscow in 1901 was a triumph for Rachmaninov, who played the solo part himself. Anna Vinnitskaya says she feels ‘a spring-like atmosphere’ in this work: throughout there is a sense of movement, of awakening. The music passes through the most contrasting psychological landscapes, but moves towards clarity and light. Rachmaninov composed the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini in 1934, ten years before his death. Brahms, Liszt, Lutosławski and Andrew Lloyd Webber are among the remarkable roll call of composers inspired by Paganini’s theme. The Russian pianist and the Polish conductor Krzysztof Urbański have often played Rachmaninoff together, on every continent. The two artists, both of whom present here their third disc for Alpha, were reunited in the NDR studios in Hamburg to record this repertory that fits them like a glove. © Alpha
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Concertos - Released August 25, 2017 | New York Philharmonic

Hi-Res
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Violin Concertos - Released August 25, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
After the mystical Hebrides Overture and the masterly ‘Reformation’ Symphony, Mendelssohn embarked on his second violin concerto. After a long gestation in which he polished the orchestration and meticulously revised the solo part, the work was finally premiered in Leipzig in 1845. From David to Joachim, several virtuosos honed the violin part with the composer over successive revivals, leaving posterity traces of their playing style: fingerings, bowings, performance marks. This precious heritage has been scrutinised here for previously unexploited expressive resources. Isabelle Faust, accompanied by the Freiburger Barockorchester in top form under the direction of Pablo Heras-Casado, offers us a miracle of purity and lyricism in this freshly minted interpretation that fulfills Mendelssohn’s promise of ‘a concerto to make the angels rejoice in heaven’! © harmonia mundi
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Concertos - Released August 25, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res
Simon Desbruslais returns to Signum with an album that continues to expand the repertoire of the trumpet even further, with four new commissions for Trumpet, Piano and String Orchestra. Toby Young’s The Art of Dancing is described by the composer as being ‘a modern homage to the baroque dance suite’, drawing inspiration from modern dance music styles including Acid House, Garage and Drum & Bass. Geoffrey Gordon’s Saint Blue is inspired by the visionary artist Wassily Kandinsky, creating a double concerto with a remarkable jazz-inspired cadenza between the trumpet, piano and double bass. Deborah Pritchard’s Seven Halts on the Somme responds to the series of oil paintings by artist Hughie O’Donoghue that mark seven stopping points for British troops during the Battle of the Somme – one of the most bloody conflicts of the First World War. Finally, Nimrod Borensteins’ Concerto for Piano, Trumpet and String Orchestra juxtaposes rhythms to create a multiplicity of different atmospheres in this highly effective and powerful work. © Signum Classics
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Concertos - Released August 10, 2017 | Český rozhlas