The Ideal Qobuz Collection comprises original, uncompiled albums that have made a considerable mark on music history or which qualify as essential recordings within each musical genre. By downloading these albums, or streaming them with your subscription, you begin a journey that will shine a light on some of the finest moments in recorded music.

Albums

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Electro - Released May 5, 2017 | Sony Music UK

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Electro - Released August 28, 2015 | Sony Music Catalog

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electro - Released August 28, 2015 | Sony Music Catalog

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

House - Released July 1, 2015 | Universal Music GmbH

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Electro - Released June 15, 2015 | Parlophone France

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Dance - Released April 24, 2015 | Defected Records

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Electro - Released October 6, 2014 | Warp Records

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An early form of You're Dead! was the length of a double album -- a large mass of brief tracks that, for Steven Ellison, possibly signified nothing more than his fifth Flying Lotus album. As the producer and keyboardist spent more time absorbing and shaping the recordings, the title, initially comic in meaning, gained emotional weight while he was provoked to consider his mortality and the losses he has been dealt, including the deaths of his father and mother, his grandmother, his great aunt Alice Coltrane, and creative collaborator Austin Peralta. The completed You're Dead! consists of 19 tracks averaging two minutes in length that are intended to be heard in sequence from front to back. Its flow is even more liquid than that of Until the Quiet Comes, though the sounds are more jagged and free, with roots deeper in jazz. Ellison once again works extensively beside longtime comrades and pulls new collaborators into his sphere. All of them -- bassist and vocalist Thundercat, drummer Deantoni Parks, saxophonist Kamasi Washington, and many others worthy of mention -- help him push jazz, R&B, rap, and electronic music forward at once. Most striking and powerful of all is "Never Catch Me," easily the longest cut. An album's worth of ideas and a whirlwind guest appearance from rapper Kendrick Lamar are condensed into its four sonically rich minutes. The tone dramatically shifts with the following "Dead Man's Tetris," a sinister concoction of melodic bleeps and gunshot effects involving Ellison as Captain Murphy, and also Snoop Dogg, in which J Dilla, Freddie Mercury, and Peralta are all part of the afterlife fantasy. Previous Flying Lotus releases have their bleak and elegiac moments, but they're central here, highlighted by "Coronus, the Terminator" (an Ellison/Niki Randa duet), "Siren Song" (fronted by Dirty Projectors' Angel Deradoorian), and "Obligatory Cadence." The instrumentals range from playful, as reflected in titles like "Turkey Dog Coma" and "Turtles," to the distressed likes of "Tesla" and "Moment of Hesitation," with the latter two both anchored by Gene Coye's feverish percussion and Herbie Hancock's glimmering/flickering piano. It all plays out in a kind of elegantly careening fashion. It concludes with "The Protest," where Laura Darlington and Kimbra softly sing "We will live on forever" like a defiant mantra. Like his great aunt, and his great uncle John Coltrane, Ellison has created exceptionally progressive, stirring, and eternal art. ~ Andy Kellman

Electro - Released August 25, 2014 | Naive

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Electro - Released February 23, 2014 | Kif music

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Taking their name from a line in the 1968 Peter Sellers film The Party, French DJ quartet Birdy Nam Nam's music is equally obscure and backward-looking: created entirely on turntables, the quartet's music consists of expertly manipulated shards of old records combined into new configurations that sound not like the usual turntablism grooves and displays of scratching prowess, but actual composed pop songs. The six-minute "Abbesses" sounds like post-rockers Tortoise jamming with a gypsy violinist and the drum section of a marching band, and the melodic drive and rhythmic swing of this track is testament to the skill with which these pop song collages were created. Elements of jazz, classical, funk, sound effects records, and unidentifiable bits of world music can be heard in instantly appealing, poppy songs like "Body, Mind, Spirit" and "Rainstorming." ~ Stewart Mason
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Electro - Released January 1, 2014 | Universal Music GmbH

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Techno - Released December 1, 2013 | Red River Entertainment

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The only old-school electro LP with any amount of staying power (thanks in part to its release on Fantasy), Enter includes crucial early singles like "Alleys of Your Mind" and "Cosmic Cars," as well as techno's first defining moment, "Clear." The collision of Atkins' vision for cosmic funk and the arena rock instincts of Rick Davis results in a surprisingly cohesive album, dated for all the right reasons and quite pop-minded. Ecological and political statements even crop up in "Cosmic Raindance" and "El Salvador." In 1990, Fantasy reissued the album with a new title (Clear) and a different track order that added "R-9" (1985) as a bonus. In 2013, the album was reissued again, this time under its original title and with several additional tracks, including "Techno City" (1984) and "Eden" (1986). One drawback: the bonus track listed as "Cosmic Cars [Detroit Style Mix]" is a duplication of the album version. ~ John Bush

House - Released October 22, 2013 | Lafessé Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Ambient - Released July 8, 2013 | InFiné

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Electro - Released May 17, 2013 | Columbia

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When Daft Punk announced they were releasing a new album eight years after 2005's Human After All, fans were starved for new material. The Tron: Legacy score indulged the seminal dance duo's sci-fi fantasies but didn't offer much in the way of catchy songs, so when Random Access Memories' extensive publicity campaign featured tantalizing clips of a new single, "Get Lucky," their fan base exploded. But when the album finally arrived, that hugely hyped single was buried far down its track list, emphasizing that most of these songs are very much not like "Get Lucky" -- or a lot of the pair's previous music, at least on the surface. The album isn't much like 2010s EDM, either. Instead, Daft Punk separate themselves from most contemporary electronic music and how it's made, enlisting some of their biggest influences to help them get the sounds they needed without samples. On Homework's "Teachers," they reverently name-checked a massive list of musicians and producers; here, they place themselves on equal footing with disco masterminds Giorgio Moroder and Nile Rodgers, referring to them as "collaborators." That could be self-aggrandizing, yet it's also strangely humble when they take a back seat to their co-stars, especially on one of RAM's definitive moments, "Giorgio by Moroder," where the producer shares his thoughts on making music with wild guitar and synth solos trailing behind him. Elsewhere, Daft Punk nod to their symbiotic relationship with indie on the lovely "Doin' It Right," which makes the most of Panda Bear's boyish vocals, and on the Julian Casablancas cameo "Instant Crush," which is only slightly more electronic than the Strokes' Comedown Machine. And of course, Pharrell Williams is the avatar of their dancefloor mastery on the sweaty disco of "Lose Yourself to Dance" as well as "Get Lucky," which is so suave that it couldn't help but be an instant classic, albeit a somewhat nostalgic one. Indeed, "memories" is the album's keyword: Daft Punk celebrate the late '70s and early '80s with lavish homages like "Give Life Back to Music" -- one of several terrific showcases for Rodgers -- and the spot-on soft rock of the Todd Edwards collaboration "Fragments of Time." More importantly, Random Access Memories taps into the wonder and excitement in that era's music. A particularly brilliant example is "Touch," where singer/songwriter Paul Williams conflates his work in Phantom of the Paradise and The Muppet Movie in the song's mystique, charm, and fragile yet unabashed emotions. Often, there's an almost gooey quality to the album; Daft Punk have never shied away from "uncool" influences or sentimentality, and both are on full display here. At first, it's hard to know what to make of all the fromage, but Random Access Memories reveals itself as the kind of grand, album rock statement that listeners of the '70s and '80s would have spent weeks or months dissecting and absorbing -- the ambition of Steely Dan, Alan Parsons, and Pink Floyd are as vital to the album as any of the duo's collaborators. For the casual Daft Punk fan, this album might be harder to love than "Get Lucky" hinted; it might be too nostalgic, too overblown, a shirking of the group's duty to rescue dance music from the Young Turks who cropped up in their absence. But Random Access Memories is also Daft Punk's most personal work, and richly rewarding for listeners willing to spend time with it. ~ Heather Phares

Electro - Released May 13, 2013 | Blackstrobe Records

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