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Rock - Released August 26, 2016 | Rhino - Parlophone

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For many Hollies enthusiasts, Evolution (1967) is considered the band's most accessible blend of pop and psychedelia. The quintet were headed into musical territories beyond simply "moon-June-bloom" and boy-meets-girl lyrics coupled with the tightly constructed vocal harmonies that had become their calling card. Nowhere is this more evident than in the tripped-out cover art from Dutch multimedia artists Seemon Kooer, Marijke Kooer, Josje Leeger, and Barry Finch -- known collectively as Fool. Although "Carrie-Anne" could be considered an extension of the trite, somewhat predictable Brit pop, there are clear indications of new horizons on cuts such as the modish "You Need Love," the arguably passé distorted electric guitar on "Have You Ever Loved Somebody," and the wailing fretwork on the driving freakbeat rocker "Then the Heartaches Begin." Graham Nash (guitar/vocals), Allan Clarke (guitar/vocals), Tony Hicks (guitar/banjo/dulcimer/vocals), Bobby Elliott (drums), and new recruit Bernie Calvert (bass/vocals) -- who replaced original member Eric Haydock in the spring of 1966 -- were also taking different approaches in their writing and arranging, as heard on the trippy "Heading for a Fall." On this tune, most prominent is the unusual six-eight time signature, coupled with Hicks' inversion of the unmistakable banjo, which is similar to the sound he conjured up on the hit "Stop, Stop, Stop." However, somewhat more atypical of the Nash-era band are the light and limber acoustic and uptempo "Stop Right There," or the baroque "Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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HI-RESkr239.39
CDkr207.49

Rock - Released August 26, 2016 | Rhino - Parlophone

Hi-Res
For many Hollies enthusiasts, Evolution (1967) is considered the band's most accessible blend of pop and psychedelia. The quintet were headed into musical territories beyond simply "moon-June-bloom" and boy-meets-girl lyrics coupled with the tightly constructed vocal harmonies that had become their calling card. Nowhere is this more evident than in the tripped-out cover art from Dutch multimedia artists Seemon Kooer, Marijke Kooer, Josje Leeger, and Barry Finch -- known collectively as Fool. Although "Carrie-Anne" could be considered an extension of the trite, somewhat predictable Brit pop, there are clear indications of new horizons on cuts such as the modish "You Need Love," the arguably passé distorted electric guitar on "Have You Ever Loved Somebody," and the wailing fretwork on the driving freakbeat rocker "Then the Heartaches Begin." Graham Nash (guitar/vocals), Allan Clarke (guitar/vocals), Tony Hicks (guitar/banjo/dulcimer/vocals), Bobby Elliott (drums), and new recruit Bernie Calvert (bass/vocals) -- who replaced original member Eric Haydock in the spring of 1966 -- were also taking different approaches in their writing and arranging, as heard on the trippy "Heading for a Fall." On this tune, most prominent is the unusual six-eight time signature, coupled with Hicks' inversion of the unmistakable banjo, which is similar to the sound he conjured up on the hit "Stop, Stop, Stop." However, somewhat more atypical of the Nash-era band are the light and limber acoustic and uptempo "Stop Right There," or the baroque "Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 15, 2016 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released May 29, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released November 7, 2011 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released June 19, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released September 26, 2011 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Hard Rock - Released November 18, 2002 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Hard Rock - Released November 18, 2002 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Hard Rock - Released November 18, 2002 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Pop - Released June 4, 2001 | Rhino - Parlophone

Because they work in a field that isn't usually taken seriously, the Pet Shop Boys are often ignored in the rock world. But make no mistake -- they are one of the most talented pop outfits working today, witty and melodic with a fine sense of flair. Very is one of their very best records, expertly weaving between the tongue-in-cheek humor of "I Wouldn't Normally Do This Kind of Thing," the quietly shocking "Can You Forgive Her?," and the bizarrely moving cover of the Village People's "Go West." Alternately happy and melancholy, Very is the Pet Shop Boys at their finest. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 22, 1990 | Rhino - Parlophone

Behavior was a retreat from the deep dance textures of Introspective, as it picked up on the carefully constructed pop of Actually. In fact, Behavior functions as the Pet Shop Boys' bid for mainstream credibility, as much of the album relies more on popcraft than rhythmic variations. Although its a subtle maneuver, it would have been rather disastrous if the results weren't so captivating. Tennant takes this approach seriously, singing the lyrics instead of speaking them. That doesn't necessarily give the album added emotional baggage -- all of the distance and detachment in the duo's music is not a hindrance, it's part of the concept -- but it does result in an ambitious and breathtaking pop album, which manages to include everything from the spiteful "How Can You Expect to Be Taken Seriously?" to the wistful "Being Boring." © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo