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Rock - Released September 2, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released April 30, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Regarded by many as one of their finest live performances, at least of the post-Roger Waters era, Pink Floyd's appearance at 1990's Knebworth Festival was buoyed by a casual sense of camaraderie and freshness. Having taken a much-needed break after two years of globe-trotting in service of 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason, the one-off show in rural Hertfordshire marked the band's return to the stage. Considered to be the festival's headliners over fellow U.K. legends like Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, and Phil Collins, the Floyd dazzled nearly 120,000 fans with career bullet points like "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" and "Comfortably Numb" along with a more recent entry in David Gilmour's sonorous guitar showcase, "Sorrow." Even the band itself has been said to have felt a certain magic in their performance, which, until its inclusion on the mammoth 2019 Later Years box set, had only been available in bootleg form. This 2020 edition, remixed by Gilmour and engineer Andy Jackson, should help cement Knebworth's place in the group's expansive canon. © Timothy Monger /TiVo

Rock - Released April 23, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released April 16, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released April 9, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released April 2, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released March 26, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released March 19, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released March 12, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

Something in the Air (Live in Paris '99) captures David Bowie live at the Elysée Montmartre on the October 14, 1999. Featuring 12 previously unreleased tracks, the live show sees Bowie not only playing songs from his 1999 release Hours… but digging deep into his back catalog. © Rich Wilson /TiVo

Rock - Released March 10, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released January 8, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released August 28, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

On 9th January 1997, David Bowie celebrated his 50th birthday in style on stage in New York’s Madison Square Garden with Lou Reed, Robert Smith, Sonic Youth, Frank Black and a few other guests. Two months earlier, the Thin White Duke had rehearsed for the event with bassist Gail Ann Dorsey, guitarist Reeves Gabrels and keyboardist Mark Plati. Nine tracks from their rehearsals were recorded. The BBC broadcast them on the 8th January 1997 - the star’s birthday. And now they’re finally available on record: ChangesNowBowie. The album essentially consists of acoustic versions of songs from his huge repertoire. With great finesse and sensitivity, Bowie covers classics like The Man Who Sold The World, Quicksand and Aladdin Sane, as well as the slightly lesser-known tracks The Supermen (from The Man Who Sold The World), Repetition (from Lodger) and Shopping For Girls (from Tin Machine’s second album). There’s also an anxiety-inducing cover of White Light/White Heat by The Velvet Underground, where Gabrel’s guitar part is pyrotechnic. All throughout ChangesNowBowie it’s Bowie’s impeccable voice that hits you. On several tracks he even deigns to share his mic with Gail Ann Dorsey, a resident in Bowie’s band since his 1995 tour… This release is another wonderful testimony to add to the expansive discography of a constantly-evolving genius. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

Originally issued in 1999 as a subscription-only release via Bowie's BowieNet website, this live album brings together tracks recorded on his 1997 Earthling Tour. The set includes songs performed in Amsterdam, Rio de Janeiro, New York, and at the Phoenix Festival in the U.K., with tracks coming from his Earthling and 1. Outside albums of the time. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released April 3, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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At the time, Marillion's remarkable, full-fledged 1983 debut Script for a Jester's Tear was considered an odd bird: replete with Peter Gabriel face paint and lengthy, technical compositions, Marillion ushered in a new generation of prog rock that bound them forever to the heroics of early day Genesis. Intricate, complex, and theatrical almost to a fault, Script for a Jester's Tear remains the band's best and sets the bar for their later work. Filled with extraordinary songs that remained staples in the band's live gigs, the album begins with the poignant title track, on which Fish leads his band of merry men on a brokenhearted tour de force that culminates with the singer decrying that "…the game is over." "He Knows You Know,," a song sprinkled with drug paranoia and guilt; as the song veers to its chorus, Fish announces, "Fast feed, crystal fever, swarming through a fractured mind." If "The Web" hints at a grain of commercialism, "Garden Party" is a joyous anthem that showcases Marillion at the peak of its powers. Bogged down by some hilariously over-the-top British poetry, "Chelsea Monday" may be one of the album's lesser moments (if there are any), but the magical "Forgotten Sons" concludes the opus magnificently. Luckily for Marillion fans, EMI released a remastered version of Script with two different versions of "Market Square Heroes," "Three Boats Down from the Candy," "Grendel," "Chelsea Monday," the demo of "He Knows You Know," and an alternate track titled "Charting the Single." A vital piece for any Marillion head and an essential work for any self-respecting first- or second-generation prog rock fan. © John Franck /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released March 13, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Progressive Rock - Released February 21, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

Rock - Released February 14, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Is It Any Wonder? collects together rare and unreleased material from David Bowie's back catalog of work. Included is the sought-after Brian Eno "live" mix of "The Man Who Sold the World," alongside other tracks released or recorded during the '90s. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Rhino - Parlophone

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What a surprise! After The Later Years: 1987-2019 compilation, here comes the rest of the huge box set dedicated to the band’s David Gilmour-era music, kick started by the departure of Roger Waters. The Later Years follows on from the retrospective which focuses on the early years (1967-1972) of the British band, released in 2016. Remastered by Gilmour and Andy Jackson, this exciting collection features the whole of A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987), the band’s first studio album without Waters, as well as a double live disc of Delicate Sound of Thunder from 1988. Finally, the fourth volume reveals five live tracks, including three flamboyant performances from Pink Floyd’s first iteration: One of These Days from Meddle (1971) in Hanover in 1994, the psychedelic Astronomy Domine composed by Syd Barrett for The Piper at the Gate of Dawn (1967) and performed in Miami in the same year, as well as Run Like Hell from The Wall (1979) performed in Atlanta in 1987. Even more gems: seven unheard tracks from 1994, from the Division Bell era. Superb. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - To be released October 19, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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After a protracted legal battle over the rights to the Pink Floyd name, David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright released 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason despite Roger Waters' protests. Retaining collaborators from Floyd's past (like producer Bob Ezrin), this Gilmour-led version of the band crafted a number of songs that were as cerebral and introspective as anything Floyd had done in the past. The first single, "Learning to Fly," served as the unofficial anthem for this latest chapter of Pink Floyd. The Andy Mackay/Gilmour-penned "One Slip" uses the requisite bells and whistles along with Tony Levin's impressive stick solo to guarantee it a prominent place in the band's canon. "The Dogs of War" and "On the Turning Away" are perfect commentaries on the conservative mindset shaping the '80s at the time. The former is an ominous screed composed at a time when the Cold War was still a reality, and the latter is a swipe against the self-absorption of the Me Decade. © Rovi Staff /TiVo