Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Bill Charlap Trio|Written In The Stars

Written In The Stars

Bill Charlap Trio

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

This is the sort of album that gives the mainstream a good name. It's wonderfully recorded, especially at the low end of the spectrum: Peter Washington's bass and Kenny Washington's kick drum speak with authority yet never overwhelm Charlap's piano. The trio's approach is distinctive, marked by tight and fairly elaborate arrangements, thrilling shifts in tempo, and wholly surprising modulations and harmonic choices on Charlap's part. The overall classicism of the group's sound recalls Tommy Flanagan. Charlap is at his most animated on the opener, a brisk reading of Cole Porter's "In the Still of the Night." He's more laid-back and deliberate on midtempo tracks like Johnny Mercer's "Dream" and the Gershwins' "Lorelei," where the Washingtons' bone-deep sense of swing really comes to the fore. Another, even more contemplative side of Charlap comes out on an achingly slow "One for My Baby" and a pair of Harold Arlen tunes, "The Man That Got Away" and "It Was Written In the Stars." However, the most comprehensive and bracing showcases of Charlap's talent are Irving Berlin's "Blue Skies" and Frank Loesser's "Slow Boat to China." Setting up the Berlin tune with the seldom-played introductory verse, Charlap then crafts a contrapuntal head arrangement that recalls early McCoy Tyner. After a round of concise and inventive solos, Charlap restates the melody in the original key of F minor, but then modulates to E minor for the concluding A section. (The pop cliché is to modulate up a half-step, not down.) The trio then vamps on a bluesy G7 tonality before wrapping up with a decorative coda. Analogous surprises also crop up during "Slow Boat to China." Charlap takes the melody at a medium tempo and then moves through a series of shifting chords before launching into a faster tempo for the solos. He plays the tune in B flat, but takes the second half of his final chorus in D -- a seemingly random event. Then he returns to B flat for the first half of the out melody, halves the tempo, and modulates to A major (again, down a half-step) to finish the song. All this is to say that Charlap is an uncommonly imaginative arranger, not to mention a great player. He's also unusually resourceful in terms of repertoire. Arlen, Porter, Gershwin, Mercer, Rodgers and Hart: These are all big-name songwriters, but Charlap astutely picks some of their lesser-known songs. And speaking of lesser-known songs, Charlap also offers a moving tribute to his late father, Broadway composer Moose Charlap, with a solo piano rendition of "I'll Never Go There Anymore." This is perhaps the clearest example of how Charlap invests his material with a genuinely personal touch.
© David R. Adler /TiVo

More info

Written In The Stars

Bill Charlap Trio

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 80 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 80 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From $17.50/month

1
In The Still Of The Night
00:07:24

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Cole Porter, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

2
Dream
00:06:43

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Mercer, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

3
The Man That Got Away
00:05:25

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ira Gershwin, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

4
Blue Skies
00:06:22

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Irving Berlin, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

5
Where Have You Been?
00:08:19

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Cole Porter, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

6
Where Or When
00:06:31

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Richard Rodgers, Composer - Lorenz Hart, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

7
On A Slow Boat To China
00:03:58

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - FRANK LOESSER, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

8
One For My Baby
00:09:38

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Mercer, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

9
I'll Never Go There Anymore
00:03:11

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Moose Charlap, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist - Eddie Lawrence, Composer

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

10
Lorelei
00:05:29

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - George Gershwin, Composer - Ira Gershwin, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

11
It Was Written In The Stars
00:06:36

Joel Moss, Producer, Recording Engineer, Mix Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Leo Robin, Composer - Peter Washington, Bass, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Kenny Washington, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Bill Charlap Trio, MainArtist

℗ 2000 EMI Music Japan Inc.

Album Description

This is the sort of album that gives the mainstream a good name. It's wonderfully recorded, especially at the low end of the spectrum: Peter Washington's bass and Kenny Washington's kick drum speak with authority yet never overwhelm Charlap's piano. The trio's approach is distinctive, marked by tight and fairly elaborate arrangements, thrilling shifts in tempo, and wholly surprising modulations and harmonic choices on Charlap's part. The overall classicism of the group's sound recalls Tommy Flanagan. Charlap is at his most animated on the opener, a brisk reading of Cole Porter's "In the Still of the Night." He's more laid-back and deliberate on midtempo tracks like Johnny Mercer's "Dream" and the Gershwins' "Lorelei," where the Washingtons' bone-deep sense of swing really comes to the fore. Another, even more contemplative side of Charlap comes out on an achingly slow "One for My Baby" and a pair of Harold Arlen tunes, "The Man That Got Away" and "It Was Written In the Stars." However, the most comprehensive and bracing showcases of Charlap's talent are Irving Berlin's "Blue Skies" and Frank Loesser's "Slow Boat to China." Setting up the Berlin tune with the seldom-played introductory verse, Charlap then crafts a contrapuntal head arrangement that recalls early McCoy Tyner. After a round of concise and inventive solos, Charlap restates the melody in the original key of F minor, but then modulates to E minor for the concluding A section. (The pop cliché is to modulate up a half-step, not down.) The trio then vamps on a bluesy G7 tonality before wrapping up with a decorative coda. Analogous surprises also crop up during "Slow Boat to China." Charlap takes the melody at a medium tempo and then moves through a series of shifting chords before launching into a faster tempo for the solos. He plays the tune in B flat, but takes the second half of his final chorus in D -- a seemingly random event. Then he returns to B flat for the first half of the out melody, halves the tempo, and modulates to A major (again, down a half-step) to finish the song. All this is to say that Charlap is an uncommonly imaginative arranger, not to mention a great player. He's also unusually resourceful in terms of repertoire. Arlen, Porter, Gershwin, Mercer, Rodgers and Hart: These are all big-name songwriters, but Charlap astutely picks some of their lesser-known songs. And speaking of lesser-known songs, Charlap also offers a moving tribute to his late father, Broadway composer Moose Charlap, with a solo piano rendition of "I'll Never Go There Anymore." This is perhaps the clearest example of how Charlap invests his material with a genuinely personal touch.
© David R. Adler /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Ascenseur pour l'échafaud

Miles Davis

Jacob's Ladder

Brad Mehldau

Jacob's Ladder Brad Mehldau

StandArt

Tigran Hamasyan

StandArt Tigran Hamasyan

I Dream Of Christmas

Norah Jones

I Dream Of Christmas Norah Jones
More on Qobuz
By Bill Charlap Trio

Street Of Dreams

Bill Charlap Trio

Street Of Dreams Bill Charlap Trio

Notes From New York

Bill Charlap Trio

Notes From New York Bill Charlap Trio

Uptown, Downtown

Bill Charlap Trio

Uptown, Downtown Bill Charlap Trio

Live At The Village Vanguard

Bill Charlap Trio

Live At The Village Vanguard Bill Charlap Trio

Street Of Dreams

Bill Charlap Trio

Street Of Dreams Bill Charlap Trio

Playlists

You may also like...

Shifting Sands

Avishai Cohen

Shifting Sands Avishai Cohen

Black Acid Soul

Lady Blackbird

Black Acid Soul Lady Blackbird

Welcome to the Black Forest (The Sounds of MPS)

Various Interprets

Sunset In The Blue

Melody Gardot

Sunset In The Blue Melody Gardot

Kind Of Blue

Miles Davis

Kind Of Blue Miles Davis
In your panoramas...
Tango: Sounds of the Río de la Plata

Rooted in dance and eventually becoming its very own artistic movement, the history of tango is an epic one; and its future truly looks limitless. A musical genre with hybrid origins, it remains one of the most incredible creations to come out of Río de la Plata. “It’s the only thing we don’t ask Europe for its opinion on,” wrote Argentina’s Macedonio Fernández, the man that young Jorge Luis Borges admired “to the point of devout and passionate plagiarism.” A number of coincidences in the late 19th century gave rise to this style of music. As musicologist Carlos Vega said: "no one really tried to create tango." And yet, here it is; complete with its own traditions and innovations, as well as its own golden age, ill-fated artists, myths and rituals.

Bossa nova, the Eternal Wave

Since its creation in the late 1950s, Bossa-nova has become an indispensable part of Brazilian music. The style’s strong evocative power won over artists from all around the world and earned recognition for many first-rate musicians whose works are now seen as classics.

Keith Jarrett’s American Quartet

At the start of his busy career Keith Jarrett spent seven years carrying out all manner of crazy experiments with his American Quartet. Between the years of 1971 and 1976, the pianist, alongside Charlie Haden, Paul Motian and Dewey Redman ran some kind of mad laboratory in which the genres of hard bop, free-jazz, world and avant-garde would all come together. A spontaneous and interesting time worth rediscovering.

In the news...