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Iván Fischer|Rachmaninov: Symphony No.2

Rachmaninov: Symphony No.2

Budapest Festival Orchestra & Ivan Fischer

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There can never be too many great recordings of Rachmaninov's Second Symphony. While not perhaps his greatest work -- surely either The Bells or the Vespers has that honor -- Rachmaninov's Second is a superbly composed, brilliantly colorful, and directly affecting work of Russian late romanticism and anyone who responds to Tchaikovsky's later symphonies will respond to Rachmaninov's Second. But while there can never be too many great recordings of the Second, most great recordings of the Second tend to sound alike. After all, what else can you do with the fuliginous depths of the opening Largo or the dramatic heights of the following Allegro moderato or the passionate twin climaxes of the Adagio except surrender to the inevitable? Thus, while this superlative recording of the Second with Iván Fischer leading the Budapest Festival Orchestra is surely a great recording of the work, it is not an especially memorable recording of the work. Fischer is an outstanding conductor with terrific baton technique and knack for choosing just the right tempo and the Budapest Festival Orchestra is a first-class ensemble with a warm blend and a shimmering tone and together they do everything they should to make this a great performance. The Largo glowers, the Allegro moderato soars, the Adagio achieves ecstasy twice. In all things, in all places, and at all the right times, this is a great Rachmaninov Second. Whether it's a memorable Rachmaninov Second is up to the individual listener. It should be added that the Vocalise as an encore is sweet, deep, and round and that Canal Grande's sound is clean, clear, and close.
© TiVo

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Rachmaninov: Symphony No.2

Iván Fischer

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1
Symphony no.2 in E Minor, Op.27: Largo/Allegro moderato
Budapest Festival Orchestra
00:18:23

Sergei Rachmaninoff, Composer - Ivan Fischer, Conductor, MainArtist - Budapest Festival Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Channel Classics Records, MusicPublisher

(C) 2006 Channel Classics Records (P) 2006 Channel Classics Records

2
Symphony no.2 in E Minor, Op.27: Allegro molto
Budapest Festival Orchestra
00:10:13

Sergei Rachmaninoff, Composer - Ivan Fischer, Conductor, MainArtist - Budapest Festival Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Channel Classics Records, MusicPublisher

(C) 2006 Channel Classics Records (P) 2006 Channel Classics Records

3
Symphony no.2 in E Minor, Op.27: Adagio
Budapest Festival Orchestra
00:14:03

Sergei Rachmaninoff, Composer - Ivan Fischer, Conductor, MainArtist - Budapest Festival Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Channel Classics Records, MusicPublisher

(C) 2006 Channel Classics Records (P) 2006 Channel Classics Records

4
Symphony no.2 in E Minor, Op.27: Adagio vivace
Budapest Festival Orchestra
00:14:15

Sergei Rachmaninoff, Composer - Ivan Fischer, Conductor, MainArtist - Budapest Festival Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Channel Classics Records, MusicPublisher

(C) 2006 Channel Classics Records (P) 2006 Channel Classics Records

5
Vocalise no.14, Op.34: Lentamente
Budapest Festival Orchestra
00:06:45

Sergei Rachmaninoff, Composer - Ivan Fischer, Conductor, MainArtist - Budapest Festival Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Channel Classics Records, MusicPublisher

(C) 2006 Channel Classics Records (P) 2006 Channel Classics Records

Album Description

There can never be too many great recordings of Rachmaninov's Second Symphony. While not perhaps his greatest work -- surely either The Bells or the Vespers has that honor -- Rachmaninov's Second is a superbly composed, brilliantly colorful, and directly affecting work of Russian late romanticism and anyone who responds to Tchaikovsky's later symphonies will respond to Rachmaninov's Second. But while there can never be too many great recordings of the Second, most great recordings of the Second tend to sound alike. After all, what else can you do with the fuliginous depths of the opening Largo or the dramatic heights of the following Allegro moderato or the passionate twin climaxes of the Adagio except surrender to the inevitable? Thus, while this superlative recording of the Second with Iván Fischer leading the Budapest Festival Orchestra is surely a great recording of the work, it is not an especially memorable recording of the work. Fischer is an outstanding conductor with terrific baton technique and knack for choosing just the right tempo and the Budapest Festival Orchestra is a first-class ensemble with a warm blend and a shimmering tone and together they do everything they should to make this a great performance. The Largo glowers, the Allegro moderato soars, the Adagio achieves ecstasy twice. In all things, in all places, and at all the right times, this is a great Rachmaninov Second. Whether it's a memorable Rachmaninov Second is up to the individual listener. It should be added that the Vocalise as an encore is sweet, deep, and round and that Canal Grande's sound is clean, clear, and close.
© TiVo

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