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Concertos - To be released February 4, 2022 | audite Musikproduktion

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Concertos - Released November 26, 2021 | PM Classics Ltd.

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Concertos - Released November 19, 2021 | LSO Live

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Here is a welcome reminder that the players of the London Symphony Orchestra aren’t just consummate orchestral musicians, but also more than capable of stepping into the concerto soloist shoes more frequently inhabited by the big-name artists who guest with them. It’s also a generously proportioned reminder, given that this Mozart programme under the baton of Jaime Martín groups together the Oboe Concerto, K. 314, the Clarinet Concerto, K. 622, the Horn Concerto, K. 417, the Sinfonia concertante, K. 297b and the 'Gran Partita". Production nuts and bolts first, and the performances were all recorded in the Jerwood Hall of LSO St. Luke’s, the concertos and the Sinfonia concertante in October 2019, and the "Gran Partita" slightly earlier, in 2015. The hall’s warmly natural clarity is a perfect match for this lucid-textured repertoire, and the positioning of the soloists themselves gently out in front, has been beautifully done. On to the actual playing, and from the orchestra these are polished, graceful performances, the overall sound a smoothly mellow one striking a nice balance between lightly articulated lucidity and the warm fullness of their large forces. Martín plays things pretty straight on the whole – for instance there’s a bit more theatricality to the phrasing of Camerata Salzburg’s recording of the Oboe Concerto with François Leleux – but there’s still nimble, cheerful buoyancy aplenty. The Oboe Concerto is in fact actually one of the album highlights, thanks to oboist Olivier Stankiewicz’s perkily articulated gossamer-weight virtuosity, singing phrasing and neatly tucked, fluttering embellishments. Meanwhile clarinettist Andrew Marriner delivers all the poised lyricism you could hope for in the Clarinet Concerto’s famous Adagio; and likewise the orchestra. Both the Sinfonia concertante, K. 297b and the "Gran Partita" have some tough recently recorded competition, the former in the form of Emmanuel Pahud’s recent Mozart in Paris programme for Erato with the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris and a starry line-up directed by Francois Leleux, and the latter from composer-clarinettist Mark Simpson’s 2021 Gramophone Award-shortlisted pairing of it with his own Geysir, his own line-up including oboist Nicolas Daniel. However both LSO readings stack up very well against their rivals, the "Gran Partita" shining for its combination of full, rich sound – fabulous in the magisterial opening – and its feather-light, lively humour. It genuinely sounds like party music. Likewise, the Sinfonia concertante reading is an immensely warm one, a joyous-sounding orchestra – listen out for some delectably ardently phrased horn moments – supporting the vivacious trio interactions of bassoonist Rachel Gough, oboist Juliana Koch, clarinettist Chris Richards. Great stuff, and a nice one for collection builders in to boot. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Concertos - Released November 19, 2021 | RUBICON

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"The Bach Violin Concertos are not only one of the Baroque period highlights, but are one of the foundations of the entire history of music", writes Swedish violinist Christian Svarfvar on his new album of "Bach Re:Composed" by fellow Swede Johan Ullén. "It’s a whole world of beauty in sixty minutes. Then you may ask yourself: why recompose something that is already so perfect?". The result is this brilliant album of re-composed Bach concertos, with a fearless and technically challenging stratospheric solo violin part contrasting with enriched cellos and basses. For those who loved Max Richter’s "Four Seasons", "Infinite Bach" will be a wonderful discovery for them. Bach was forward looking and his influence has travelled the centuries, influencing jazz, rock and pop musicians as well as every classical composer who came after him. © Rubicon Classics

Concertos - Released November 19, 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Frank Peter Zimmermann and the Berliner Philharmoniker have been closely connected ever since their first concert together at the Waldbühne in 1985. His performances have created a common thread between generations of musicians, and hardly any of the conductors who have shaped the orchestra over the years have not worked with this exceptional violinist. For Frank Peter Zimmermann, Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto dedicated "To the Memory of an Angel" is one of the greatest works of the violin repertoire - a kind of requiem for Manon Gropius, who died at a young age. Frank Peter Zimmermann’s performance reveals the deeply Romantic timbre of the twelve-tone work, which the soloist says "took a piece of his soul" after each performance. Frank Peter Zimmermann considers the time he spent making music with Kirill Petrenko to be unforgettable "magical moments". © Berliner Philharmoniker Recordings
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Concertos - Released November 19, 2021 | ASC Records

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Concertos - Released November 19, 2021 | Niv Classical

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Concertos - Released November 18, 2021 | MSR Classics

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Concertos - Released November 12, 2021 | Tempéraments - Radio France

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Concertos - Released November 12, 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Concertos - Released November 12, 2021 | Orquestra Simfònica De Les Illes Balears

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Concertos - Released November 5, 2021 | harmonia mundi

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Unexpected Beethoven. With Beethoven’s Piano Concertos No. 4 and Op. 61a, the latter being the composer’s own transcription of his Violin Concerto, Gianluca Cascioli, Riccardo Minasi and Ensemble Resonanz present two milestones of the piano literature. Basing their interpretation on intensive source research in the archives of the Vienna Musikverein and on handwritten notes by Beethoven, the performers suggest an alternative, more varied and virtuosic version of the piano part in Concerto No. 4. © harmonia mundi

Concertos - Released November 5, 2021 | Niv Classical

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Concertos - Released November 1, 2021 | Ricardo Delgado Herbert

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Concertos - Released October 22, 2021 | La Dolce Volta

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Concertos - Released October 22, 2021 | Artis Hallazgo

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Concertos - Released October 14, 2021 | Isis

Concertos - Released October 12, 2021 | Jsm Guitar Records

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Concertos - Released October 8, 2021 | Audax Records

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France's contribution to the genre of the Baroque solo concerto seems late and tentative, but it is fascinating to see how French composers managed to combine Italian robustness and French elegance in their works. Johannes Pramsohler and Ensemble Diderot take a journey to the origins of this hybrid form, presenting here the very first violin concertos by French composers, with two world-premiere recordings of concertos by Jean-Marie Leclair and André-Joseph Exaudet at the heart of this virtuosic and exciting programme. © Audax Records