Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Isaac Hayes|The Isaac Hayes Movement

The Isaac Hayes Movement

Isaac Hayes

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 192.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Although this is Isaac Hayes' third long-player, he had long been a staple of the Memphis R&B scene -- primarily within the Stax coterie -- where his multiple talents included instrumentalist, arranger, and composer of some of the most beloved soul music of the '60s. Along with his primary collaborator, David Porter, Hayes was responsible for well over 200 sides -- including the genre-defining "When Something Is Wrong With My Baby," "Soul Man," "B-A-B-Y," "Hold On, I'm Comin'," and "I Had a Dream." As a solo artist however, Hayes redefined the role of the long-player with his inimitably smooth narrative style of covering classic pop and R&B tracks, many of which would spiral well over ten minutes. The Isaac Hayes Movement (1970) includes four extended cuts from several seemingly disparate sources, stylistically ranging from George Harrison's "Something" to Jerry Butler's "I Stand Accused" and even Burt Bacharach and Hal David's "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself." These early Hayes recordings brilliantly showcase his indomitable skills as an arranger -- as he places familiar themes into fresh contexts and perspectives. For example, his lengthy one-sided dialogue that prefaces "I Stand Accused" is halting in its candor as Hayes depicts an aching soul who longs for his best friend's fiancée. Even the most hard-hearted can't help but have sympathy pains as he unravels his sordid emotional agony and anguish. Hayes' lyrical orchestration totally reinvents the structure of "Something" -- which includes several extended instrumental sections -- incorporating equally expressive contributions from John Blair (violin). Both "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself" and the comparatively short (at under six minutes) "One Big Unhappy Family" are more traditionally arranged ballads. Hayes again tastefully incorporates both string and horn sections to augment the languid rhythm, providing contrasting textures rather than gaudy adornment. These sides offer a difference between the proverbial "Black Moses of Soul" persona that would be responsible for the aggressive no-nonsense funk of Shaft (1971) and Truck Turner (1974).
© Lindsay Planer /TiVo

More info

The Isaac Hayes Movement

Isaac Hayes

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 90 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 90 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From kr125.00/month

1
I Stand Accused
00:11:39

Isaac Hayes, Producer, Recording Producer, MainArtist - Jerry Butler, ComposerLyricist - Billy Butler, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2016 Concord Music Group, Inc.

2
One Big Unhappy Family
00:05:54

Sandra Rhodes, ComposerLyricist - Isaac Hayes, Producer, Recording Producer, MainArtist - Charles Chalmers, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2016 Concord Music Group, Inc.

3
I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself
00:07:06

Isaac Hayes, Producer, MainArtist - Burt Bacharach, ComposerLyricist - Hal David, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2016 Concord Music Group, Inc.

4
Something
00:11:46

Isaac Hayes, Producer, Recording Producer, MainArtist - GEORGE HARRISON, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2016 Concord Music Group, Inc.

Album Description

Although this is Isaac Hayes' third long-player, he had long been a staple of the Memphis R&B scene -- primarily within the Stax coterie -- where his multiple talents included instrumentalist, arranger, and composer of some of the most beloved soul music of the '60s. Along with his primary collaborator, David Porter, Hayes was responsible for well over 200 sides -- including the genre-defining "When Something Is Wrong With My Baby," "Soul Man," "B-A-B-Y," "Hold On, I'm Comin'," and "I Had a Dream." As a solo artist however, Hayes redefined the role of the long-player with his inimitably smooth narrative style of covering classic pop and R&B tracks, many of which would spiral well over ten minutes. The Isaac Hayes Movement (1970) includes four extended cuts from several seemingly disparate sources, stylistically ranging from George Harrison's "Something" to Jerry Butler's "I Stand Accused" and even Burt Bacharach and Hal David's "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself." These early Hayes recordings brilliantly showcase his indomitable skills as an arranger -- as he places familiar themes into fresh contexts and perspectives. For example, his lengthy one-sided dialogue that prefaces "I Stand Accused" is halting in its candor as Hayes depicts an aching soul who longs for his best friend's fiancée. Even the most hard-hearted can't help but have sympathy pains as he unravels his sordid emotional agony and anguish. Hayes' lyrical orchestration totally reinvents the structure of "Something" -- which includes several extended instrumental sections -- incorporating equally expressive contributions from John Blair (violin). Both "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself" and the comparatively short (at under six minutes) "One Big Unhappy Family" are more traditionally arranged ballads. Hayes again tastefully incorporates both string and horn sections to augment the languid rhythm, providing contrasting textures rather than gaudy adornment. These sides offer a difference between the proverbial "Black Moses of Soul" persona that would be responsible for the aggressive no-nonsense funk of Shaft (1971) and Truck Turner (1974).
© Lindsay Planer /TiVo

About the album

Improve album information

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

More on Qobuz
By Isaac Hayes

My Pretty Limit

Isaac Hayes

My Pretty Limit Isaac Hayes

Shaft

Isaac Hayes

Shaft Isaac Hayes

Hot Buttered Soul

Isaac Hayes

Hot Buttered Soul Isaac Hayes

Black Moses

Isaac Hayes

Black Moses Isaac Hayes

Nobody Needs Me

Isaac Hayes

Nobody Needs Me Isaac Hayes
You may also like...

Thriller 40

Michael Jackson

Thriller 40 Michael Jackson

Thriller 25 (Super Deluxe Edition)

Michael Jackson

Bad

Michael Jackson

Bad Michael Jackson

Thriller

Michael Jackson

Thriller Michael Jackson

What's Going On

Marvin Gaye

What's Going On Marvin Gaye
In your panoramas...
How Kanye West Turned Hip-hop on its Head

Over the last twenty years, Kanye West has consistently changed the course of rap music and influenced his era’s pop scene like no other. Collaborating with Paul McCartney, Rick Rubin, and Rihanna, he has both revitalized the careers of Jay-Z and Common and provided a platform for Kid Cudi and John Legend. Kanye West remains a major influence on artists such as Childish Gambino, Drake and The Weeknd. Cast yourself back to the career of an endlessly enigmatic artist.

1972: The Album’s Golden Year

1972 was a monumental year for albums. From the The Rolling Stones to Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin to Big Star, there was an abundance of artists releasing career-defining and redefining music. Here we make our case for ten of the best.

Curtis Mayfield, in a League of his Own

Aesthete guitar player worshiped by Jimi Hendrix, extraordinary falsetto singer revered by Prince, and a brilliant songwriter, Curtis Mayfield treated melodies as a master sculptor. His songs melded funk, gospel and soul together. Twenty years after his death, his politically charged music is still relevant and well-suited to describe America under Donald Trump.

In the news...