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Limp Bizkit|Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water

Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water

Limp Bizkit

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Let's start with the title, not only the winner for the Billy Corgan award for ludicrous monikers, but a title, like Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, that's a winking acknowledgement that the group knows what its stereotype is. Smashing Pumpkins knew everybody thought they were tragic romantics; Limp Bizkit know everybody believes they're juvenile vulgarians, so they're ready to prove 'em right. And how do they do that? With a title that's defiantly vulgar but, more revealingly, embarrassingly awkward. The scatological meaning of Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water is obvious to anyone who's graduated junior high, but it stumbles over its punch line, winding up as more bewildering than funny or offensive. But it doesn't stop there, or with the sickly cover art, since hot dogs and chocolate starfishes become lyrical themes on the album. Clearly, Limp leader Fred Durst takes some pride in his ass and dick joke, since he repeatedly uses it to illustrate the one theme of the album, namely how nobody understands him, especially in Limp Bizkit's year of success after 1999's Significant Other. He may occasionally attempt to frame his rage as us versus them, as on "My Generation," but he winds up bringing everything around to himself. Envision a Use Your Illusion where Axl Rose felt compelled to rewrite "Get in the Ring" for every song, just to make sure that you, dear fan, realize that he's persecuted and thank the lord above that you're there to understand him. And that's it. There's nothing else to the record. If the band supported him with sheets of noise, terrifying guitars, monstrous rhythms, or even a hook every now and then, Durst's narcissism may have been palatable, but the group pretty much churns out the same colorless heavy plod for each song. Combined, Durst's self-pitying and the monotonous music give away that the band bashed Chocolate Starfish out very quickly -- it's the sound of a band determined to deliver a sequel in a finite amount of time. Since Bizkit have never relied on song or studiocraft, it shouldn't come as a surprise that neither is in evidence here, but the problem is they're fishing in a shallow pool. Previously, they had pent-up rage on their side, but here, the music sounds rote -- when it gets louder, it signifies nothing, it just gets louder -- and Durst can see no farther than his past year. That past year may have been a whirlwind of success and fame, but that doesn't stop him from dwelling on the people that have said bad things about him, nearly ignoring those who (somewhat justifiably) argued that he helped stoke the fires as Woodstock '99 in favor of the "critics that don't get it," which includes a whole song sniping at labelmate Trent Reznor. Now, undoubtedly, there are some fans that will empathize with Durst, but the question is, will it really resonate with them? After all, everyone feels rage after being dumped by their significant other, but does everyone live in a world where they feel like they're attacked on all sides? Come to think of it, they do, but Durst's vision on Chocolate Starfish is so insular, it's hard for anyone else, even his bandmates, to come inside. [Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water was also released in a "clean" version containing no profanities. This basically guts the record, especially "Hot Dog" where "f*cking up" is used upward of 50 times, but parents should be reassured that there's this option on the market. But they should consider this -- not one profanity is used sexually, it's all an expression of rage or slang. After a while, the cursing isn't even noticeable, since it's so omnipresent it winds up signifying nothing. It's just part of the midrange hum, like the drums and droning guitars.]
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water

Limp Bizkit

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1
Intro (Limp Bizkit / Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water)
00:01:19

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

2
Hot Dog Explicit
00:03:50

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Trent Reznor, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

3
My Generation (Album Version) Explicit
00:03:41

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

4
Full Nelson (Album Version)
00:04:07

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

5
My Way Explicit
00:04:33

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - William Griffin, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Eric Barrier, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

6
Rollin' (Air Raid Vehicle) Explicit
00:03:34

Kasseem Dean, ComposerLyricist - Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

7
Livin' It Up Explicit
00:04:24

Fred Durst, Author - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, Composer - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - Glenn Frey, ComposerLyricist - DON HENLEY, ComposerLyricist - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Joe Walsh, ComposerLyricist - Sam Rivers, Composer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

8
The One (Album Version)
00:05:43

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

9
Getcha Groove On (Dirt Road Mix) Explicit
00:04:19

Fred Durst, Author, Producer - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - DJ Lethal, Composer, Producer - Xzibit, Rap Vocalist, FeaturedArtist, AssociatedPerformer - DJ Premier, Remixer, StudioPersonnel - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, MainArtist - Alvin Joiner, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2001 Interscope Records

10
Take A Look Around
00:05:20

Brendan O'Brien, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Lalo Schifrin, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

11
It'll Be OK (Album Version)
00:05:06

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

12
Boiler (Album Version)
00:07:00

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

13
Hold On
00:05:46

Fred Durst, Author - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, Composer - Samuel Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - Scott Weiland, ComposerLyricist - TERRY DATE, Producer - Sam Rivers, Composer - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

14
Rollin' (Urban Assault Vehicle) (Album Version) Explicit
00:06:23

Clifford Smith, ComposerLyricist - Kasseem Dean, ComposerLyricist - Reggie Noble, ComposerLyricist - Earl Simmons, ComposerLyricist - Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - Swizz Beatz, Producer - Method Man, FeaturedArtist - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Redman, FeaturedArtist - DMX, FeaturedArtist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

15
Outro (Limp Bizkit/Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water)
00:09:49

Fred Durst, ComposerLyricist - Wes Borland, ComposerLyricist - John Otto, ComposerLyricist - Josh Abraham, Producer, Additional Producer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - TERRY DATE, Producer - Sam Rivers, ComposerLyricist - Leor DiMant, ComposerLyricist - Limp Bizkit, Producer, MainArtist - Scott Welland, Producer, Additional Producer

℗ 2000 Interscope Records

Album Description

Let's start with the title, not only the winner for the Billy Corgan award for ludicrous monikers, but a title, like Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, that's a winking acknowledgement that the group knows what its stereotype is. Smashing Pumpkins knew everybody thought they were tragic romantics; Limp Bizkit know everybody believes they're juvenile vulgarians, so they're ready to prove 'em right. And how do they do that? With a title that's defiantly vulgar but, more revealingly, embarrassingly awkward. The scatological meaning of Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water is obvious to anyone who's graduated junior high, but it stumbles over its punch line, winding up as more bewildering than funny or offensive. But it doesn't stop there, or with the sickly cover art, since hot dogs and chocolate starfishes become lyrical themes on the album. Clearly, Limp leader Fred Durst takes some pride in his ass and dick joke, since he repeatedly uses it to illustrate the one theme of the album, namely how nobody understands him, especially in Limp Bizkit's year of success after 1999's Significant Other. He may occasionally attempt to frame his rage as us versus them, as on "My Generation," but he winds up bringing everything around to himself. Envision a Use Your Illusion where Axl Rose felt compelled to rewrite "Get in the Ring" for every song, just to make sure that you, dear fan, realize that he's persecuted and thank the lord above that you're there to understand him. And that's it. There's nothing else to the record. If the band supported him with sheets of noise, terrifying guitars, monstrous rhythms, or even a hook every now and then, Durst's narcissism may have been palatable, but the group pretty much churns out the same colorless heavy plod for each song. Combined, Durst's self-pitying and the monotonous music give away that the band bashed Chocolate Starfish out very quickly -- it's the sound of a band determined to deliver a sequel in a finite amount of time. Since Bizkit have never relied on song or studiocraft, it shouldn't come as a surprise that neither is in evidence here, but the problem is they're fishing in a shallow pool. Previously, they had pent-up rage on their side, but here, the music sounds rote -- when it gets louder, it signifies nothing, it just gets louder -- and Durst can see no farther than his past year. That past year may have been a whirlwind of success and fame, but that doesn't stop him from dwelling on the people that have said bad things about him, nearly ignoring those who (somewhat justifiably) argued that he helped stoke the fires as Woodstock '99 in favor of the "critics that don't get it," which includes a whole song sniping at labelmate Trent Reznor. Now, undoubtedly, there are some fans that will empathize with Durst, but the question is, will it really resonate with them? After all, everyone feels rage after being dumped by their significant other, but does everyone live in a world where they feel like they're attacked on all sides? Come to think of it, they do, but Durst's vision on Chocolate Starfish is so insular, it's hard for anyone else, even his bandmates, to come inside. [Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water was also released in a "clean" version containing no profanities. This basically guts the record, especially "Hot Dog" where "f*cking up" is used upward of 50 times, but parents should be reassured that there's this option on the market. But they should consider this -- not one profanity is used sexually, it's all an expression of rage or slang. After a while, the cursing isn't even noticeable, since it's so omnipresent it winds up signifying nothing. It's just part of the midrange hum, like the drums and droning guitars.]
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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