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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 26 maart 2009 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 23 april 2003 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1988 | Columbia

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 mei 1990 | Columbia

Weighing in at 14 tracks, Greatest Hits is a good, basic collection of the Bangles' biggest singles, containing all the hits, including the previously non-LP "Hazy Shade of Winter," plus a couple of album tracks and, for the dedicated, a new cover of the Grass Roots' "Where Were You When I Needed You." It may be easy to carp about fine album tracks from All Over the Place and Different Light that should have been included, yet this is a fine sampler/introduction that might not necessarily capture the Bangles' best -- in this context, their ties to the Paisley Underground and college rock seem nonexistent -- but still finds them as masters of irresistible pop singles. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1986 | Columbia

The Bangles' first album, All Over the Place, may have earned them a smattering of radio and MTV airplay, but it's clear that with Different Light they were aiming for much higher stakes, especially when Prince -- who was reportedly infatuated with Susanna Hoffs -- offered to write a song for them. "Manic Monday"'s baroque, keyboard-dominated sound was a far cry from anything the Bangles had recorded before, and while Hoffs' breathy voice and her bandmates' fine harmonies fit the song like a glove, it also sent the group down a path that led them away from the '60s-influenced pop/rock that was their strongest suit, and though Vicki Peterson does get to show off her guitar work on a few songs here, the differences between Different Light and All Over the Place are telling and a bit sad. The drum machines that dominate "Walk Like an Egyptian" and "Walking Down Your Street" rob the performances of the organic feel of this group's best music, the funky accents of "Standing in the Hallway" are simply out of place, and while covering Big Star ("September Gurls") and Jules Shear ("If She Knew What She Wants") may have sounded good on paper, neither performance captures what makes each song special. And while the album struggles to rally in the last innings with the more personal air of "Following" and "Not Like You," most of the songs struggle to stand up under David Kahne's overly slick production and the layers of gingerbread added by a handful of guest musicians. Different Light turned the Bangles into bona fide pop stars, but it also transformed a spunky and distinctive band into a comparatively faceless vehicle for a hit-seeking producer; the group tries to let its personality shine through despite it all, but the effort fails most of the time. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1988 | Columbia

From
CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1986 | Columbia

The Bangles' first album, All Over the Place, may have earned them a smattering of radio and MTV airplay, but it's clear that with Different Light they were aiming for much higher stakes, especially when Prince -- who was reportedly infatuated with Susanna Hoffs -- offered to write a song for them. "Manic Monday"'s baroque, keyboard-dominated sound was a far cry from anything the Bangles had recorded before, and while Hoffs' breathy voice and her bandmates' fine harmonies fit the song like a glove, it also sent the group down a path that led them away from the '60s-influenced pop/rock that was their strongest suit, and though Vicki Peterson does get to show off her guitar work on a few songs here, the differences between Different Light and All Over the Place are telling and a bit sad. The drum machines that dominate "Walk Like an Egyptian" and "Walking Down Your Street" rob the performances of the organic feel of this group's best music, the funky accents of "Standing in the Hallway" are simply out of place, and while covering Big Star ("September Gurls") and Jules Shear ("If She Knew What She Wants") may have sounded good on paper, neither performance captures what makes each song special. And while the album struggles to rally in the last innings with the more personal air of "Following" and "Not Like You," most of the songs struggle to stand up under David Kahne's overly slick production and the layers of gingerbread added by a handful of guest musicians. Different Light turned the Bangles into bona fide pop stars, but it also transformed a spunky and distinctive band into a comparatively faceless vehicle for a hit-seeking producer; the group tries to let its personality shine through despite it all, but the effort fails most of the time. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 mei 1990 | Columbia

Weighing in at 14 tracks, Greatest Hits is a good, basic collection of the Bangles' biggest singles, containing all the hits, including the previously non-LP "Hazy Shade of Winter," plus a couple of album tracks and, for the dedicated, a new cover of the Grass Roots' "Where Were You When I Needed You." It may be easy to carp about fine album tracks from All Over the Place and Different Light that should have been included, yet this is a fine sampler/introduction that might not necessarily capture the Bangles' best -- in this context, their ties to the Paisley Underground and college rock seem nonexistent -- but still finds them as masters of irresistible pop singles. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 mei 1990 | Columbia

Weighing in at 14 tracks, Greatest Hits is a good, basic collection of the Bangles' biggest singles, containing all the hits, including the previously non-LP "Hazy Shade of Winter," plus a couple of album tracks and, for the dedicated, a new cover of the Grass Roots' "Where Were You When I Needed You." It may be easy to carp about fine album tracks from All Over the Place and Different Light that should have been included, yet this is a fine sampler/introduction that might not necessarily capture the Bangles' best -- in this context, their ties to the Paisley Underground and college rock seem nonexistent -- but still finds them as masters of irresistible pop singles. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Columbia

This is about the third or fourth collection of Bangles music entitled Eternal Flame to be released, courtesy of Sony Music Media (hey, somebody's got to sell enough records to cover the losses incurred by Michael Jackson). This time the source is the company's German division, and the concept is a little different, devoted to the album versions as opposed to the single edits and mixes of "September Gurls," "Walk Like an Egyptian," "If She Knew What She Wants," "Hero Takes a Fall," "Live," "Manic Monday," "James," "Complicated Girl," "Bell Jar," and "Eternal Flame." The running time is exactly 32 minutes, and the sound, as becomes a 2004 CD release, is state-of-the-art, which means not only nice and loud but with a lot of presence -- this CD puts the instruments in your lap and the voices in your ear, drums and rippling guitars filling the room even on cheap speakers. You have to love little details like the multi-layered guitar parts exposed on their version of Emitt Rhodes' "Live," which comes out like a live performance. The only thing missing that would make this low mid-priced import perfect is "A Hazy Shade of Winter," which somehow got overlooked. There are no notes and none needed. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 30 april 2009 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 21 juli 1998 | Columbia - Legacy

Super Hits collects ten tracks recorded during the Bangles tenure with Columbia Records in the '80s, including the original versions of "Manic Monday," "Walk Like an Egyptian," "Eternal Flame," "A Hazy Shade of Winter" and "Going Down to Liverpool." Ultimately, this collection isn't as hit detailed as The Best of the Bangles but it's still a good bargain for the budget-conscious. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 23 september 2003 | eOne Music

From
CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1986 | Columbia

The Bangles' first album, All Over the Place, may have earned them a smattering of radio and MTV airplay, but it's clear that with Different Light they were aiming for much higher stakes, especially when Prince -- who was reportedly infatuated with Susanna Hoffs -- offered to write a song for them. "Manic Monday"'s baroque, keyboard-dominated sound was a far cry from anything the Bangles had recorded before, and while Hoffs' breathy voice and her bandmates' fine harmonies fit the song like a glove, it also sent the group down a path that led them away from the '60s-influenced pop/rock that was their strongest suit, and though Vicki Peterson does get to show off her guitar work on a few songs here, the differences between Different Light and All Over the Place are telling and a bit sad. The drum machines that dominate "Walk Like an Egyptian" and "Walking Down Your Street" rob the performances of the organic feel of this group's best music, the funky accents of "Standing in the Hallway" are simply out of place, and while covering Big Star ("September Gurls") and Jules Shear ("If She Knew What She Wants") may have sounded good on paper, neither performance captures what makes each song special. And while the album struggles to rally in the last innings with the more personal air of "Following" and "Not Like You," most of the songs struggle to stand up under David Kahne's overly slick production and the layers of gingerbread added by a handful of guest musicians. Different Light turned the Bangles into bona fide pop stars, but it also transformed a spunky and distinctive band into a comparatively faceless vehicle for a hit-seeking producer; the group tries to let its personality shine through despite it all, but the effort fails most of the time. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1988 | Columbia

From
CD€ 14,49

Pop - Verschenen op 1 mei 1990 | Columbia

Weighing in at 14 tracks, Greatest Hits is a good, basic collection of the Bangles' biggest singles, containing all the hits, including the previously non-LP "Hazy Shade of Winter," plus a couple of album tracks and, for the dedicated, a new cover of the Grass Roots' "Where Were You When I Needed You." It may be easy to carp about fine album tracks from All Over the Place and Different Light that should have been included, yet this is a fine sampler/introduction that might not necessarily capture the Bangles' best -- in this context, their ties to the Paisley Underground and college rock seem nonexistent -- but still finds them as masters of irresistible pop singles. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€ 14,49

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Columbia

This is about the third or fourth collection of Bangles music entitled Eternal Flame to be released, courtesy of Sony Music Media (hey, somebody's got to sell enough records to cover the losses incurred by Michael Jackson). This time the source is the company's German division, and the concept is a little different, devoted to the album versions as opposed to the single edits and mixes of "September Gurls," "Walk Like an Egyptian," "If She Knew What She Wants," "Hero Takes a Fall," "Live," "Manic Monday," "James," "Complicated Girl," "Bell Jar," and "Eternal Flame." The running time is exactly 32 minutes, and the sound, as becomes a 2004 CD release, is state-of-the-art, which means not only nice and loud but with a lot of presence -- this CD puts the instruments in your lap and the voices in your ear, drums and rippling guitars filling the room even on cheap speakers. You have to love little details like the multi-layered guitar parts exposed on their version of Emitt Rhodes' "Live," which comes out like a live performance. The only thing missing that would make this low mid-priced import perfect is "A Hazy Shade of Winter," which somehow got overlooked. There are no notes and none needed. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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CD€ 11,99

Pop - Verschenen op 18 december 2014 | Down Kiddie!

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 10 november 2008 | Legacy Recordings

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CD€ 14,49

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1984 | Columbia

While the Bangles would later embrace a radio-friendly pop production style (and enjoy attendant commercial success) that separated them from their early peers, they were the only figures from the L.A. paisley underground scene who would go on to become genuine multi-platinum rock stars, and while their first full-length album, 1984's All Over the Place, showed that some of their rough edges were already being buffed away, of their major-label output it's the record that most openly embraces the folk-rock and garage rock influences that fueled their earliest music. Vicki Peterson's lead guitar and the band's stellar harmonies are the vehicles that drive these 11 songs, and if producer David Kahne was already pushing the group in a more commercially ambitious direction, there's no disguising the psychedelic guitar figures on "Dover Beach" or the Byrds-meets-Raiders jangle of "Tell Me," and the choice of the Merry-Go-Round's "Live" as a cover is especially telling. All Over the Place is also the Bangles' most unified full-length album; Susanna Hoffs hadn't yet been singled out as the star of the show, and the round-robin lead vocals, stellar harmonies, and tight, concise arrangements make them sound like a real-deal rock band, and the set's gentle but insistent sway from British Invasion-styled rock and West Coast pop feels natural, unforced, and effective. And when drummer Debbie Peterson and bassist Michael Steele feel like rocking out, the Bangles generate a lot more heat than they're usually given credit for, most notably on "Silent Treatment." The Bangles' second full album, Different Light, would sell a lot more copies, but All Over the Place is easily their best and most satisfying LP. © Mark Deming /TiVo