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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 24 februari 2014 | Concord - Loma Vista - Caroline

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music - Hi-Res Audio
In 2014 levert de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Annie Erin Clark alias St. Vincent haar vierde soloalbum af. Het album, waaraan onder meer de drummers Homer Steinweiss (Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings) en McKenzie Smith (Midlake) meewerken markeert de doorbraak van de zangeres. Want op St. Vincent (2014) laat de gelijknamige muzikante horen voor inventieve en eigenzinnige indiepop haar hand niet om te draaien. © TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 12 september 2011 | 4AD

Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music - Sélection Les Inrocks
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 24 februari 2014 | Concord - Loma Vista - Caroline

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music
In 2014 levert de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Annie Erin Clark alias St. Vincent haar vierde soloalbum af. Het album, waaraan onder meer de drummers Homer Steinweiss (Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings) en McKenzie Smith (Midlake) meewerken markeert de doorbraak van de zangeres. Want op St. Vincent (2014) laat de gelijknamige muzikante horen voor inventieve en eigenzinnige indiepop haar hand niet om te draaien. © TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 5 mei 2009 | 4AD

Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music
St. Vincent's Annie Clark is a unique talent; she's as much a musician as she is a songwriter, and both her sounds and her words are delicately uncompromising. She blends rock, jazz, electronic, and classical touches together so seamlessly that it doesn't seem remarkable, and as lovely as her voice and music can be, she's too strange and too smart to be merely winsome. Marry Me was as bold as its title proposal suggested, uniting her sardonic, whip-smart viewpoint and jaunty music into songs with beacon-like clarity. Things are murkier, but no less fascinating, on Actor, Marry Me's darker and more ambitious follow-up. Musically and lyrically, the album often feels like a duel (and occasionally, a duet) between Clark's collected, literate side and her raging emotions. This is especially striking on Actor's arrangements and instrumentation, which are even more expressive than they were on Marry Me. "The Strangers" opens the album with choral vocals, woodwinds, and typically charming/unsettling lyrics: "Desperate doesn't look good on you/Neither does your virtue." But before things get too dainty, massively distorted guitar and drums let out the fury that's been brewing in the song the entire time (later, "The Bed" offers an even sharper contrast between innocence and violence). "Marrow" is just as startling, switching from pretty to abrasive and back again with a swiftness that's surprising, even knowing how fond Clark is of turning her songs on their sides. She also loves couching uncomfortable moments in sweet sounds and vice versa, so it's no surprise that Actor's poppiest songs are its most disturbing. On the album's single, the forceful rocker "Actor Out of Work," she pulls in and levels a lover in just over two minutes, beginning with alluring "oohs" and then twisting the knife with putdowns like "You're the curses through my teeth" -- the song's brisk dance between hot and cold is dazzling. Likewise, "Laughing with a Mouth of Blood" pairs the album's most gruesome song title with one of its most honeyed melodies. As brilliantly as Clark uses these contrasts, at times they threaten to overpower Actor's songs, and the slightly more straightforward, Marry Me-like tracks such as "Save Me from What I Want" and "The Party" help balance the album with some breathing space. Similarly, while the album's elaborately layered sounds are engrossing, they tend to overshadow Clark's equally thoughtful lyrics at first -- although when she sings "Tomorrow's some kind of stranger who I'm not supposed to see" on "The Neighbors," it's with more palpable emotion than anything she sang on Marry Me. "The Sequel" ends Actor on a fittingly uneasy, open-ended note, given all the complexities that came before it. This is some of St. Vincent's most complicated music, but its fearless creativity rewards repeated listening, as Clark has few rivals when it comes to seducing ears and challenging minds at the same time. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 14 mei 2021 | Loma Vista Recordings

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We are at the point now in Annie Clark's career as St. Vincent that the parlor game of "autobiography, high concept, or both?" has become de rigueur with each album release. To be sure, Clark has never hewn closely (or, really, at all) to the dynamic of confessional songwriter that too often is expected of women making music, but the way that she teases out moments from her own life, recontextualizes them into fully-built worlds, and then shifts seamlessly between the two, leaves the listener unsure as to whether we're hearing from "Annie Clark," "St. Vincent," a brand-new character, or some amalgamation of the three. And, until Daddy's Home, that conceptual conceit has been the thing that linked St. Vincent most closely to David Bowie. Now, though, Clark is explicitly calling out the Bowie comparisons by making an album steeped in homage to the 1970s of Bowie's creative peak. While Daddy's Home is definitely not a glam-rock album, it's also detached from the maximalism of the last few St. Vincent releases. Instead, it's thick with warm, organic grooves and genre fluidity, evoking the liminal space between Bowie and Luther Vandross on Young Americans as easily as it does the spacey cocaine afterburn of Station to Station. However, while on one hand she's clearly calling out the "character-building" at play here, Clark has also been forthright in interviews surrounding the album in saying that the "daddy" of the title is her actual father, who is now "home" after being in jail for the last few years. The '70s rock vibe of many of the tracks definitely seems to evoke a dad's record collection, and the title track—which is either an abandoned showtune demo or a loose, gritty, and spare piece of indie rock—boasts some incredibly direct lyrics about visiting an inmate and wondering if their badness is your burden; but it's also probably the least interesting cut here musically. "Down and Out Downtown" sounds like "Strange Mercy" (the title track of the third St. Vincent album which turned out to be about her reaction to her father being sent to jail) reworked by the Beastie Boys with a country-sitar vibe. Does that make the album autobiographical? Who knows! Likewise, "The Melting of the Sun" tackles sexism in the entertainment industry, while dizzyingly conflating the struggles of Joni Mitchell with those of Marilyn Monroe. Again: maybe autobiographical? Who knows! This is not a game anyone will win. Instead, look to album opener "Pay Your Way in Pain"—a glitchy, Prince-ly take on analog funk—which seems to be about just making it through the day when you just want to be loved. However, it is unmistakable that the conceit and concept behind Clark's approach here—a warm, slightly sleazy, definitely human take on "rock 'n' roll"—is effective. "Live in the Dream" is a George Harrison-esque piece of dreamy light-psych with a deep vein of pathos, while "The Melting of the Sun" is a slice of soulful psychedelia, complete with background singers and wobbly sonics; they are wisely sequenced next to one another as they seem to form the spiritual core of the album. Similarly, "At the Holiday Party" nearly gets lost near the end of the running order, but it is a singer/songwriter track of the highest order, alternating between stark simplicity, baroque cinematic flourishes, and groove-oriented ecstasy. It's a refreshing and wholly unexpected take for St. Vincent, whoever she may be today. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 13 oktober 2017 | Concord Loma Vista

For St. Vincent’s 4th album released in 2013, self-titled as St. Vincent, the genius of Annie Clark exploded like never before. She brought with it her fascinating writing style, weird and wacky instrumentations, a sumptuous and elastic voice, not to mention an unparalleled final assembly. It’s not something everyone can do: succeed in uniting both a Talking Heads-like spirit and the noteworthy textures of King Crimson, while also leaning in the direction of 80s new wave and Bowie… Four years later, the Texan multi-instrumentalist has gone down a similar path. St. Vincent heads off again in the most experimental directions, always staying in line with the goal of composing the perfect pop song. In doing so, she never risks becoming an American Björk and stays rooted to her pop DNA. Indeed, it is when she strips back the accompanying instruments that she is at her most convincing. Such is the case for New York, a sublime love letter to a lost love in the Big Apple, put together with a simple piano that in itself makes Masseduction worth buying… This fifth album also has the particularity of being without a doubt the most personal by the author. Annie Clark exposes herself, opening up about herself and her life like never before. She steers clear of any hot gossip about her past lovers Cara Delevigne or Kristen Stewart, but does use a more intimate language this time round, removing any make-up from her lyrics. These introspections still don’t inhibit any eccentric breaks that sometimes verge on surrealism. Above all, Masseduction is the record from St. Vincent that’s perhaps the most… bowiesque? © MZ/Qobuz
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 12 oktober 2018 | Loma Vista Recordings

While Annie Clark is a beast on the guitar, obsessed with futuristic and mad sounds, she’s first and foremost a composer. And to highlight the musical layers of her songs, the brain behind St Vincent decided to strip them bare for MassEducation. Co-produced with pianist Thomas Bartlett, it is a fully acoustic – vocals and piano – reinterpretation of her album Masseduction released a year before, in October 2017. For the fans who know her electric tracks by heart, it is without doubt an intense and beautiful experience. For others, it may take a bit of getting used to. This stylistic exercise also showcases Clark’s vocal capabilities, a true vocalist and comedian who takes even her smallest ideas all the way. In fact it is her voice that fills the instrumental bareness and makes this album such an enchanting experience. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 17 september 2021 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 10 juli 2007 | Beggars Banquet

With experience playing with the Polyphonic Spree, Sufjan Stevens, and Glenn Branca, Annie Clark is more than qualified enough to start writing her own loosely ornate, lush pop songs. But while Clark, who chooses to use the name St. Vincent here, does incorporate the frilly strings and horns, background choirs, and various keyboards (most of which she plays) of her past employers in Marry Me, her solo debut, she also has an edge to her -- something that shows up in the distorted electric guitar solos of "Jesus Saves, I Spend" or "Now, Now," the drums in the ominous "The Apocalypse Song" or "Your Lips Are Red," the growing intensity of the vocals "Landmines," the funereal waltz of the fantastic "Paris Is Burning" ("I write to give the war is over/Send my cinders home to mother," Clark sings sadly over electronic drumbeats and acoustic guitars) -- that pushes her away from the overly sentimental and quaint. Not that Marry Me doesn't have its fair share of happy love songs ("All My Stars Aligned," "What Me Worry?"), but the album isn't seeped in that kind of joyfulness that sings blind and insincere. It's an mix of good and bad, of light and dark, of the woman who purposefully sets up the obstacles she must get through to find her lover ("I'm crawling through landmines/I know 'cause I planted them," she sings disarmingly), of sweet self-deprecation ("Marry me, John, I'll be so good to you/You won't realize I'm gone"), honest and quirky and totally enticing. Clark is young enough that she's still able to retain that sense of wonder about the world without seeming naïve, and old enough that she can say things like "My hands are red from sealing your red lips" and you believe her. It's an orchestral record for those who prefer the simplistic, a darker one for those who prefer theirs twee, love songs for the scorned and sad songs for the content, an engaging and alluring combination that makes Marry Me nearly irresistible, and one of the better indie pop albums that's come around for a long time. © Marisa Brown /TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 28 augustus 2020 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 13 december 2019 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 13 februari 2012 | 4AD

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 1 juni 2018 | Concord Loma Vista

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 29 juni 2021 | Blackened Recordings - Universal Music

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 24 februari 2014 | Concord - Loma Vista - Caroline

In 2014 levert de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Annie Erin Clark alias St. Vincent haar vierde soloalbum af. Het album, waaraan onder meer de drummers Homer Steinweiss (Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings) en McKenzie Smith (Midlake) meewerken markeert de doorbraak van de zangeres. Want op St. Vincent (2014) laat de gelijknamige muzikante horen voor inventieve en eigenzinnige indiepop haar hand niet om te draaien. © TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 24 februari 2014 | Concord Records, Inc.

In 2014 levert de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Annie Erin Clark alias St. Vincent haar vierde soloalbum af. Het album, waaraan onder meer de drummers Homer Steinweiss (Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings) en McKenzie Smith (Midlake) meewerken markeert de doorbraak van de zangeres. Want op St. Vincent (2014) laat de gelijknamige muzikante horen voor inventieve en eigenzinnige indiepop haar hand niet om te draaien. © TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 13 december 2019 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Folk - Verschenen op 6 juli 2009 | sprocket records

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 30 april 2012 | 4AD

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 25 oktober 2019 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Artiest

St. Vincent in het magazine
  • Reeducation
    Reeducation While Annie Clark is a beast on the guitar, obsessed with futuristic and mad sounds, she’s first and foremost a composer.
  • The passion of St. Vincent
    The passion of St. Vincent Is Annie Clark the reincarnation of David Bowie?
  • St. Vincent - Qobuz Interview
    St. Vincent - Qobuz Interview Meet Annie Clark, the voice behind the fourth album effort of St. Vincent, which confirms the immense talent of this young composer as she puts her own spin on rock fusion, electro and new wave.